Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 23, June 7

A Disaster in the Making
Byline: Rana Foroohar China needs cleaner, greener growth. Dianchi Lake, in the southwestern city of Kunming, used to be one of China's worst environmental disaster zones. Years of industrialization and high-intensity farming, beginning in the...
A Legal Thriller in London
Byline: Rachel Ehrenfeld As the old adage goes, books have a life of their own. I learned this firsthand after publishing my third one, Funding Evil, which identified networks of criminals, billionaires, and state leaders who underwrite terrorism...
Black Water Rising
Byline: Evan Thomas and Daniel Stone The flow of oil may soon end, but the political and environmental fallout is just getting started. The blowout preventer looks like a five-story fire hydrant. It weighs 325 tons and costs $18 million. At the...
Defining Poverty Up
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson How to create more 'poor.' Who is poor in America? This is a hard question to answer, and the Obama administration would make it harder. It's hard be-cause there's no conclusive definition of poverty. Low income matters,...
Don't Fence Them In
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores The Arizona of the future won't suffer from too many immigrants--but from too few. Yet again, Americans are suffering a period of national distress over illegal immigration. The latest episode started when an Arizona...
Facebook's False Contrition
Byline: Daniel Lyons A business built on your data. mark zuckerberg won't say he's sorry, but the 26-year-old CEO and founder of Facebook promises to change his ways--a little. His non-apology came last week after mounting outrage at recent alterations...
Fast, Loose, and out of Control
Byline: Matthew Philips Trading billions of shares in the blink of an eye has made stock markets more responsive--and volatile--than ever. On April 26, the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 11,205, up nearly 70apercent since its low in March...
How Queer Is That?
Byline: Number 17, NYC Funny how prominent conservatives with antigay records are so often caught in gay sex scandals, isn't it? Some examples: 1. WHO 2. RECORD 3. SCANDAL 4. EXPLANATION 5. CURRENTLY GEORGE REKERS MINISTER...
Man in the Middle
Byline: Dan Ephron Investigating Israel's 2009 war in Gaza made Richard Goldstone an enemy of the state. What if he'd said no? Richard Goldstone, the retired South African judge who at the end of a celebrated career agreed to insert himself between...
No War with North Korea
Byline: Takashi Yokota The two Koreas have seemed headed for a serious collision ever since international investigators confirmed that it was a North -Korean torpedo that sank the South's warship Cheonan on March 26. Last week Pyongyang's National...
Obama vs. Al Capone
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Whose foreign policy makes more sense? They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But the recent snapshot of Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva embracing Iran's...
Pop Goes the Art House
Byline: Seth Colter Walls Critics are loath to admit it, but every once in a while we come across an album of such thuddingly obvious quality that writing a straight-up review seems boring. When a release is heralded by so many outlets--in print,...
The GOP Looks West
Byline: Jacob Weisberg A party for cowboy constitutionalists. One way to understand the divisions in the Republican Party is as a clash of regional philosophies. Northeastern conservatism is moderate, accepts the modern welfare state, and dislikes...
The Hidden Brain
Byline: Sharon Begley What scientists can learn from 'nothing.' It took Sherlock Holmes to deduce the significance of the dog that didn't bark.* So maybe it's understandable that neuroscientists have traditionally ignored the brain activity that...
'These Problems Can Be Solved'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The cofounder of Intellectual Ventures on the future of energy. The word "polymath" was invented for a man like Nathan Myhrvold, who earned a Ph.D. in theoretical physics by age 23, studied with Stephen Hawking, made millions...
The Surrealism World
Byline: Peter Plagens Long before the American Idolization of every art form on the planet, the great humorist S. J. Perelman imagined a gnarly New York painter being asked by a vulgarian Hollywood movie producer: what exactly do you artists do...
Trial, Error, and the Gulf of Mexico
Byline: Jon Meacham Forty-seven Junes ago, on a sunny afternoon in Washington, President John F. Kennedy delivered the commencement address at American University. Speaking to the class of 1963, he was philosophical and expansive, ruminating on...