Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 06, February 7

A Climate Cure's Dark Side
Byline: Sharon Begley It sounded like a panacea for climate change: "geo-engineering" the atmosphere to block some sunlight and counter global warming. Now scientists scrutinizing the approach say it could produce dangerous cascade effects, severely...
America's Deporter in Chief
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Frustrated by the federal stalemate on illegal immigration, cities and states have spent the last few years crafting their own curbs on unlawful residency. The most publicized of these was in Arizona, which ordered police with...
Ask a Celebrity Geek
Byline: Daniel Lyons Quora is the new site where you can interrogate Mark Cuban--and Ashton Kutcher. For people who already have their hands full keeping up with Facebook, scanning Twitter tweets, and answering email too, here's a heads up. The...
Crazy Chick Flicks
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Why does it take a nervous breakdown to get a girl noticed in Hollywood? You want to know why Natalie Portman is a shoo-in for the Oscar, here's one answer. It's not just that she lost 20 pounds for the role, spent nearly...
Economics Saved My Marriage
Byline: Paula Szuchman How a Nobel laureate got me to stop nagging my husband. To prove a point after a nasty argument--kitchen cabinets were again left open, words were exchanged--my husband sketched a graph plotting the recent state of our...
How Obama Can Close the Deal with Business
Byline: Daniel Gross; Gross is economics editor at Yahoo Finance. In case you hadn't noticed, President Obama has been on a mission to love-bomb corporate America in recent weeks, from cutting a deal to extend Bush-era tax rates to peppering the...
Is America Toast?
As President Obama rolls out a plan to kick-start innovation, three of the country's top business minds talked to Randall Lane about economic reinvention. Edited excerpts: What will drive innovation in the next decade? Paul Saffo, managing director...
Is Oprah's Network Too White?
Byline: Allison Samuels; With Joshua Alston Farah J. Griffin's 82-year-old mother, Wilhelmenia, hasn't missed an episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show since it debuted nearly 20 years ago. So when Winfrey's 24-hour Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) debuted...
Manifesto for Egypt
Byline: Mohamed ElBaradei The manifesto by Mohamed ElBaradei first appeared on Newsweek.com and The Daily Beast, published on the eve of the opposition leader's return to Egypt. The text was widely distributed and, on his return, ElBaradei was placed...
Meet My Real Modern Family
Byline: Andrew Solomon As a gay man, the author never expected to have children. Now he and his husband have four between them. How science, friendship, and love created an unconventional clan. Children used to make me sad. With the happy children...
Mr. Duncan's Smart Lesson Plan
Byline: George F. Will Budget crises have their benefits. Arne Duncan, 46, a 6-foot-5 former basketball player (he played professionally in Australia), was on the Harvard team that set the NCAA record for highest free-throw percentage. He and...
My Name Is Rahm and I'm on the Bleeping Ballot
Byline: Jonathan Alter A challenge to his residency settled, the former White House chief of staff is on track to take over Chicago. For 24 hours, Rahm Emanuel sweated in frigid Chicago. "I, like the city, was thrown for a loop," he told me later,...
Nixon Returns-And Hits the High Notes
Byline: Seth Colter Walls Picture this on an opera stage: President Richard Nixon lands in Beijing to deliver an aria about the mystery of the news industry beaming his story back to the West. Then he receives a philosophical lecture from his host...
Obama's Mideast Moment of Truth
Byline: Peter Beinart America is losing its grip on the region. Thank goodness. What do the mass protests in Egypt and the leaked documents about the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations have in common? They show that the Middle East is spinning...
Rage against the Regime
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh, Christopher Dickey and Mike Giglio From Tunisia to Egypt to Yemen, a youthful uprising is challenging the Arab world's rulers. But if the old order falls, what will take its place? One by one, the lines of communication...
The Dirty Secret of Apple's Design
Byline: Blake Gopnik This article is being written on a brand-new MacBook Air. It is a gorgeous thing, all crisp edges, sleek surfaces, and continuous flow. In recent days, as pundits have speculated about the future of Apple under an ailing Steve...
The Mammogram Hustle
There is no evidence digital mammograms improve cancer detection in older women. But thanks to political pressure, Medicare pays 65 percent more for them. When patients at women's diagnostic of Texas began canceling their mammogram appointments...
The Myth of Aging Gracefully
Byline: Susan Jacoby Who wants to live to 100? Just about everyone, if old age fulfills the fantasy that we can sail through our 90s with vigorous bodies and minds and die instantly of a heart attack, preferably while making love or running the...
The Super Bowl of Sex Trafficking
Byline: Michelle Goldberg While football fans are eagerly anticipating the Feb. 5 Super Bowl showdown in Dallas, some state officials are gearing up for the big game's dark side: the surge in human trafficking that tends to accompany major sports...