Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 11

And the Beat Goes on; More Than 20 Percent of the Coronary Bypass Operations in the Country Are Done 'Off Pump,' with the Heart Pounding in the Chest like the Living Thing It Is
Byline: David Noonan (With Dan Berrett) Five minutes after you meet Joel (Barlow) Davis, it feels as if you've known him for years. As open and affable as a handshake, Davis, a retired country-music bass player and singer, wasn't trying to fool...
Appreciation: Shelby Foote, Voice of the South
Byline: Malcolm Jones If Foote, who died last week at 88, had never written "Shiloh," his terse, unsentimental novel about the 1862 Civil War battle, he might not have gone on to become the best-known narrative historian of the Civil War. He certainly...
Chopper Down over Kunar; A Special Ops Unit Calls for Help, and a Rescue Goes Awry
Byline: John Barry and Michael Hirsh (With Zahid Hussain in Islamabad and Sami Yousafzai in Peshawar) The two special forces Chinook helicopters had come in, unfortunately, at sunset. They were racing to rescue their comrades on the ground. Onboard...
Finding a New Groove; the Music Biz Is Upbeat about Downloads and Wireless
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts It was an unusual but fitting code name: "Project Tapas" was launched a year ago by Andy Lack, the new CEO of Sony BMG Music Entertainment, to end a raging war between music companies and peer-to-peer networks like Grokster...
Get out of the Water!
Byline: Prakash Gandhi, William Lee Adams and Arian Campo-Flores Four years after a spate of shark attacks prompted a media frenzy, is another "summer of the shark" about to break over us? A week ago last Saturday, a shark killed a 14-year-old girl...
Ground Zero: Freedom Tower, Take 2
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan On July 4, 2004, New York Gov. George Pataki laid the cornerstone (actually a granite slab buried way down in the foundation) for the new Freedom Tower at Ground Zero. Turns out he was a little hasty. Last week, just before...
Host Cities: Olympic Calculations
Byline: Mark Starr If New York City loses its bid for the 2012 Olympics this week, the United States immediately becomes a heavy favorite to host the next Summer Games in 2016. On Wednesday, the International Olympic Committee will vote on 2012,...
Invinceible; He Broke Big in Comedy, but He Wanted People to See His Range. Bad Idea. Mr. Vaughn Kills Again in 'Wedding Crashers.'
Byline: Devin Gordon For the first hour and a half of his interview with NEWSWEEK, Vince Vaughn is--oh, might as well come right out and say it--a bit of a snooze. He is polite, professional and completely unrevealing. His agenda on this lovely...
Iran's Nuclear Lies; Iran Says Its Nuclear Program Is for Peaceful Uses Only. but a History of Deception Raises Doubts
Byline: Christopher Dickey (With Babak Dehghanpisheh at Bushehr, Dan Ephron in Tel Aviv and Michael Hirsh in Washington Graphic by Andrew Romano) Beyond the antiaircraft-gun emplacements and the early-warning radar systems, and shortly before you...
'Iran Wants to Be a Major Player'
Byline: Christopher Dickey Iran has been one of Mohamed ElBaradei's biggest worries since International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors uncovered the country's secret nuclear program in 2003. Last week, in his first interview since winning a third...
Is Anybody Making Movies We'll Actually Watch in 50 Years? Forget Fame and Money. Forget Paparazzi Chases, Phone Throwing and Couch Jumping
Byline: David Ansen She was "America's sweetheart." For 10 years in a row she appeared on the list of the top-10 Hollywood stars, and in 1943 she was the most popular star in the world, her pinup a keepsake accompanying American soldiers to war....
Let's Stay out of This Fight; It's an Incendiary Mixture: China and Oil. but Washington Should Stay out of the Battle between Chevron and CNOOC for Unocal
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We cannot decide whether China is a threat or an opportunity, and until we do, every discussion of our relations seems to slide into confusion and acrimony. The latest example is the noisy controversy over the bid by...
Married to a Monster; Husband, Father, Serial Murderer: The BTK Killer Is Not the Only One. What the Families of Serial Killers Go Through
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Jessica Silver-Greenberg (With Courtney Cloyd in Kansas and Karen Springen in Chicago) From his jail in Wichita, Dennis Rader, the sadistic serial killer who called himself BTK--short for his method: bind, torture, kill--phoned...
Money: Cheaper by the Bucket
Byline: Linda Stern Here's a Wall Street riddle: what's highly technical, dry (some would say boring), and very hot this summer? If you follow the money, you already know the answer: exchange-traded funds, or ETFs. These index-fund clones are raking...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, George Lyle IV, David Gates Q&A: Jennifer Connelly Jennifer Connelly does a lot of crying and screaming in her new scary movie, "Dark Water." But she spoke calmly about skin care and apartment hunting with NEWSWEEK's...
Now Available: Middle Ground; If Access to a Pill That Decreases the Number of Abortions Is Not a Welcome Development, What Is the Point of the Anti-Abortion Exercise?
Byline: Anna Quindlen In theory, access to the drug called Plan B should be a no-brainer. It's safe, it's effective, it's easily available in dozens of countries. But Plan B is a drug used to prevent pregnancy, and nothing about preventing pregnancy...
Pensions: A Bold Move Pays off; Two Years Ago, GM Launched a Risky Strategy to Shore Up Its Huge Pension Fund. Inside Project Alpha
Byline: Allan Sloan General Motors has been criticized for years for its timid strategy when it comes to making and selling vehicles. But when it comes to its pension fund, a drag on the company for years, GM has been bold and decisive. Exhibit...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: Associated Press (2), The Washington Post, Associated Press, CNN, San Jose Mercury News, CNN (2), New York Times (2) "A high standard of legal ability, judgment and integrity." President George W. Bush, on what he...
Presidential Books: A Space on the Shelf
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Tamara Lipper Bill Clinton offered an exhaustive look at his life. George H.W. Bush authored a foreign-policy tome with his national-security adviser, and followed with a collection of his letters. Now George W. Bush is...
Queen of the Center; the Swing Vote: She's a Cowgirl from Sagebrush Country, a Pioneer Who Defied the Odds. the Life and Legacy of a Moderate Justice
***** CORRECTION: In "O'Connor's Odyssey" we said that Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was president of Arizona's State Senate, when, in fact, she served as majority leader. In addition, a photo caption said that O'Connor was on the Arizona Supreme...
Revving Up GM; Mark LaNeve's Tough New Assignment: Build Buzz and Boost Sales at General Motors. He Likes His Chances
Byline: Keith Naughton There hasn't been much to celebrate at General Motors lately. So as its "employee discount for everyone" deal filled showrooms last month, the automaker's new marketing chief, Mark LaNeve, gathered his troops in Orlando, Fla.,...
Struggling to Make Peace with the Atom; One of the Things Dad and I Shared Was Our Uneasiness about His Contribution to History
***** CORRECTION: The July 11 My Turn, "Struggling to Make Peace With the Atom," stated that the half-life of depleted uranium is 4.5 million years. It is actually 4.5 billion years. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Danielle Woerner...
The Comeback King; John Mack Will Try to Heal the Wounds at Morgan
Byline: Charles Gasparino John Mack figured he was the last guy Morgan Stanley would consider to run the firm after chief executive Phil Purcell resigned under pressure last month. After all, when Mack left the company in 2001 following a bitter...
The Commandment Mystery; the Court Ruled on a Settled Sacred Text. or Did It? an Analysis
Byline: Allan Sloan You may think that the Supreme Court ruled last week that the state of Texas could continue to display a Ten Commandments monolith on its capitol grounds in Austin. But you'd be wrong. Look at the monolith--you can find it at...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Twenty-four summers ago, when Ronald Reagan--still recovering from his gunshot wound and only weeks away from signing his historic tax cut into law--made Sandra Day O'Connor the nation's first female Supreme Court justice, the...
The Holy War Begins; Bush Must Choose between the Big Tent or the Revival Tent. Inside His Supreme Machine
Byline: Howard Fineman and Debra Rosenberg (With Richard Wolffe, Tamara Lipper and Holly Bailey) As soon as President George W. Bush officially got the news--Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was retiring--he huddled with his innermost circle. He wanted...
The Rove Factor? Time Magazine Talked to Bush's Guru for Plame Story
Byline: Michael Isikoff Its legal appeals exhausted, Time magazine agreed last week to turn over reporter Matthew Cooper's e-mails and computer notes to a special prosecutor investigating the leak of an undercover CIA agent's identity. The case...
The Supremes Hit the Pirate Ships; A Legal Win for Hollywood on File Sharing Won't Necessarily Translate to the Real World
Byline: Steven Levy There is something about the pomp and circumstance of a Supreme Court decision, especially a long-awaited one like last week's file-sharing case, that tempts one to view any conclusion of nine justices as a historic turning point....
We Need to Cool It; Even without Federal Leadership on Global Warming, States and Businesses Are Starting to Take Action. A Leading Advocate for Clean Energy Explains
Byline: Anne Underwood In 1997, Eileen Claussen, a former assistant secretary of State and onetime EPA official, received an intriguing call from officials at the Pew Charitable Trusts: if they wanted to spend a lot of money to address global warming,...
You Shield Us, We'll Shield You; Once Federal Prosecutors Get in the Habit of Forcing Reporters to Cough Up Their Sources, Readers Will Be Dining on Handouts and Hokum
Byline: Jonathan Alter As a general rule, journalists shouldn't be in the business of lobbying Congress. But once in a long while an issue comes along that so threatens what we do--and what you read and see--that we need to use whatever leverage...