Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 26

2005 Edition: A Year of Living Dangerously
2005 will be mostly remembered for bad news: the mounting death toll in the Iraq quagmire, terrorist attacks around the globe, a devastating hurricane compounded by a slow response in the gulf, a depressingly huge budget deficit, a return to prosecutors...
Big Enough to Know Better; China Has Grown for Three Decades at a Pace No Other Country Has Ever Sustained. but 2006 May Be the Year When We Begin to See Problems
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) By the time you read this column, China's economy will have jumped by 20 percent, or $300 billion. Based on a new nationwide economic census, the National Bureau of Statistics...
Celebs: Cruise Goes Crazy
Byline: Sean Smith Tom Cruise lost his cool in 2005. For 20 years he had maintained the most fiercely controlled--and aggressively bland--persona of any living star. But then he fired his longtime publicist, Pat Kingsley, and replaced her with his...
Doo-Ri Chung; from the Basement of a Dry Cleaner's to the Big Time
Byline: Holly Peterson Amid the breezy bossa nova music and the clicking of socialites' heels, designer Doo-Ri Chung did some final fiddling to make the strings of Swarovski crystals hang just so down the back of a halter gown. Then the model walked...
Frankincense in Aisle Five! O Ye of Little Faith, Who Believe That Somehow the Birth of Christ Is Dependent upon Recognition in a Circular from OfficeMax!
Byline: Anna Quindlen According to the story, a little more than 2,000 years ago a baby was born in a stable in Bethlehem while his young parents were in town for a nationwide census. Because of the influx of visitors, there were no rooms available...
Gordon Brown; A Rugby Player in a Rumpled Suit Is in Line to Take over from Tony Blair
Byline: Stryker McGuire When future British historians look back at these times, they may see a few similarities between John Major and Gordon Brown. Today, the 54-year-old Brown is chancellor of the Exchequer--the job Major held until he gained...
How Much Longer? Iraqis Are Counting Their Ballots, but U.S. Ground Commanders Still Can't Give a Timetable for Coming Home. Here's Why
Byline: Scott Johnson and Joshua Hammer (With Michael Hirsh and John Barry in Washington) It was the day they had all been waiting for, and Gen. George Casey couldn't sleep. Everything was riding on this--not the least how long Casey would have...
Joseph Canizaro; the City's Future May Depend on a Mogul with Bush's Ear
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Joseph Canizaro was just putting the finishing touches on his new mansion west of New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck. More than four years in the making, the extravagant beaux-arts palace had 12-foot-high ceilings,...
Learning How to Hope; amid the Heartache-Feelings That Can Lead to Tears in an Instant-A Few Rays of Winter Sun Are Slipping Through
Byline: Jonathan Alter New Orleans in December is cool and dry, and the 20 percent that wasn't flooded seems normal enough. But the pictures don't even begin to convey the scope of what 17 days of standing water will do to the delicate ecosystem...
Lisa Randall; Looking at the Earth's Tiniest Particles to Explain the Mysteries of the Cosmos
Byline: Jerry Adler Sometime in 2007, the Large Hadron Collider, the world's most powerful particle accelerator, will start operations near Geneva, Switzerland, and the universe we think we know may disappear in a shower of elementary particles....
Michael Chertoff: 'What the Hell Is Going on?'; in Washington, a Struggle to Find Answers to Terrible Questions
Byline: Evan Thomas The lowest moment, Michael Chertoff recalls, came at about 2 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 1, three days after Katrina struck. An NPR interviewer asked the secretary of Homeland Security what he was doing about the thousands of people...
Mormons: Heavenly Prophecy
Byline: Elise Soukup You're not going to mention polygamy, are you?" I was asked by more than one fellow Mormon when they heard I was working on a story about the church's founding. I expected it to be difficult for me to confront what one Mormon...
Music: Continuing Journey
Byline: Bret Begun It had been hiding some-where in the night. Journey's 1981 power ballad "Don't Stop Believin' " had suffered an ignoble fall, from Billboard top-10 hit to--well, let's not discuss the crimes perpetrated on Steve Perry's song in...
Perspectives 2005; Devastating Storms, a New Pope, a White House Scandal and the 2,000th U.S. Death in Iraq. A Look Back in Cartoons and Quotes
"What I'm hearing, which is sort of scary, is they all want to stay in Texas. Everyone is so overwhelmed by the hospitality. And so many of the people in the arena here, you know, were underprivileged anyway, so this is working very well for them."...
Saigon; No Thuggery? No Misogyny? What Kind of Rapper Is This? Stay Tuned
Byline: Lorraine Ali Saigon is hip-hop's great new hope--and one of its most unlikely. He's unimpressed by bling, actually likes women and cringes at the idea of becoming a video thug. "If I hear one more person say 'I'm a hustler,' I think I'm...
Seth Wescott; at the Games in Turin, There Will Be a New Way to Be King of the Hill
Byline: Mark Starr Seth Wescott couldn't have imagined a worse start. As he burst out of the gate for his semifinal run at this year's World Snowboard Championships, the binding on his boots let loose. For the first 100 yards he tried to stay calm...
Taken by Storm; the Hurricane Was Just the Start. How Katrina Shook a Family, a Cop, an Art Dealer and a Pol
Byline: Evan Thomas (--With reporting from Karen Breslau, Arian Campo-Flores, T. Trent Gegax and Andrew Murr) Hurricane Katrina was less than 24 hours away. The Category 5 hurricane threatened to overwhelm the dikes surrounding the city, much of...
Terror: Everyone's a Mastermind
Byline: Mark Hosenball It sounded like a breakthrough in the war on terror: shortly after Thanksgiving, Pakistani authorities announced that Qaeda operative Hamza Rabia had been killed in remote North Waziristan. Now, U.S. officials said, Al Qaeda's...
The 'Code' Breakers; the Most Popular-And Controversial-Novel of Our Time Hits the Screen in May. an Exclusive Report on the Second Coming of 'The Da Vinci Code.'
Byline: Devin Gordon Like so many luxuries in this life, getting permission to shoot a movie inside the Louvre is easier if you know the right people. For three months in late 2004, the Oscar-winning filmmakers behind "The Da Vinci Code," director...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker How did NEWSWEEK get the exclusive on the most anticipated movie of 2006? Like "The Da Vinci Code" itself, it's a long story. Jeff Giles, our Arts and Entertainment editor, had been calling the folks at Sony Pictures since...
The Job Ahead: 'They're Not Going Back'; America's Top General in Iraq Tells What Can and Can't Be Done
Byline: Scott Johnson Gen. George Casey has been in charge of U.S. and Coalition forces in Iraq since June 2004. He spoke with NEWSWEEK's Scott Johnson before and after Election Day on hopes and concerns for the country's future. Excerpts: JOHNSON:...
The MySpace.com Guys; Their Social-Networking Site Is Busier Than Google. for Their Next Act
Byline: Brad Stone In late 2003, Tom Anderson and Chris DeWolfe launched a social-networking site, MySpace.com, to let teens and young adults make friends and discover new, budding rock stars. The idea worked so well that this year Anderson and...
The President: Now, Time to Dig Out
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey Two days after his re-election victory, President Bush mapped out a strategy for 2005 to reporters in a White House auditorium. "I earned capital in the campaign, political capital," he said, "and now I intend...
The Spouses of 'Big Love'; HBO Takes on a Polygamist's Marriage in Its Latest Series. Meet the Family
Byline: Marc Peyser Bill Henrickson (Bill Paxton) pops a lot of Viagra. A lot, as in one every day, which he pulls from a bottle he keeps in his pants pocket. That seems like a heap of thrill pills for a happy, healthy, forty- something married...
The Virginians; Want to Know How the Campaigns Ahead Will Unfold? Look to the Old Dominion, Where Two Rising Stars Offer Competing Models for How to Succeed with Southern Voters
Byline: Howard Fineman As young men in law school in the 1970s, neither Mark Warner nor George Allen set the legal world on fire. At Harvard, Warner founded a group called the Somerville Bar Review--that's "bar" as in drinking studies, not professional...
Unforgettable; This Was the Year We Said Goodbye to a Giant of the Church and a Giant of the Civil-Rights Movement. to a Great American Playwright, to a Great American Comic and to the King of the American Night. and to Some Whose Names We Never Knew
Pope John Paul II, 84 No pope since Peter had loomed so large. His travels to 129 countries over 26 years covered the equivalent of three times the distance between the Earth and the moon. He was seen in person by more people than any other leader,...