Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 20, November 12

A Cha-Cha Chat with A Lot of Spice
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Scary Spice (Melanie Brown) is the star on "Dancing With the Stars," but after the series ends, she won't stop dancing. She's going on the Spice Girls reunion tour. She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. NEWSWEEK: Does having the...
A Civil War on Campus
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh; With Silvia Spring And Iraqi Staff In Baghdad Sunnis and Shiites are dividing the classroom. The ceremony was no ordinary after-school activity. Prayer flags and banners were plastered across walls at east Baghdad's...
A Glimpse of Light in the Distance
Byline: Thijs Niemantsverdriet An ex-Marine thinks he can extend the working day for millions of people. Late one Sunday evening in Africa, the light began to dawn on Mark Bent. The Houston-born former Marine was living on the southern shore...
An Ex-A.G. Avoids Caller Id
Byline: Michael Isikoff The nation's telecommunications companies want immunity from lawsuits related to their participation in President Bush's warrantless-surveillance program, and to get it, they've been mounting an aggressive Capitol Hill lobbying...
A Scrap over Scrapbooks
Byline: Linda Fantin If scrapbooking conjures up images of kindly suburban women passing pictures around the kitchen table, then you don't know the modern hobby. Outraged scrapbookers recently forced the industry's top magazine, Creating Keepsakes,...
Back Talk: Where Jihad Has Found a Home
'The Most Dangerous Nation in the World Isn't Iraq. It's Pakistan': We received a wide range of responses to our cover story. One self described U.S. resident of Pakistani origin said, "In choosing to focus on those who can be labeled extremists...
Congenital Lawyer Redux
Byline: Jonathan Alter Masters of politics can flip-flop. Clinton isn't in a league with her husband, but is she agile enough? "She's a congenital liar." that was New York Times columnist William Safire in 1996, assessing First Lady Hillary Clinton's...
Do-Gooders Gone Bad
Byline: Arlene Getz; With Christopher Dickey And Amber Haq In Paris Activists have brought issues like Darfur into living rooms. But they may be doing more harm than good. The children's bandages were just for show. Workers from the little-known...
Drowning in Questions
Byline: Dan Ephron and Michael Isikoff The confirmation battle over President Bush's nominee for attorney general Michael Mukasey has hinged on his position regarding a CIA interrogation technique known as waterboarding. While calling it "repugnant"...
From A Prison to Princeton
His dorm room was 'beautiful,' he says. 'I didn't have to use my kerosene lamp.' When Abass Hassan Mohamed was born in Somalia in 1982, his father honored the event with a variation on a traditional Somali ritual. Instead of tying the umbilical...
Google Goes Globe-Trotting
Byline: Steven Levy To train a new generation of leaders, the search giant sends young brainiacs on a worldwide mission. There are no computers in the tiny village of Raagihalli, located 30 miles outside Bangalore, India. Overseas visitors seldom...
Harlem's Hero and Heroin
Byline: David Ansen Denzel and Russell can't save 'American Gangster' from feeling like just another Hollywood mob job. Ridley Scott's "American Gangster" announces, with its grandiose title and epic sweep, that it wants to take its place among...
Haunted by HIV's Origins
Byline: Mary Carmichael Michael Worobey, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Arizona, is a nice guy -- not the sort to seek out international controversy. But last week he found himself deluged with angry e-mails, and the Haitian Embassy...
Iowa's Field of Dreamers
When nominating contests were squeezed into January, it was to ease Iowa's impact. But in an ironic twist, the Hawkeye State may now be more crucial. Iowans are nice, maybe too nice. Late last month, NEWSWEEK political blogger Andrew Romano followed...
Leaving Las Vegas
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Celine Dion spent five years in the desert. Let's see if she can still swim, and sing, with the big guys. Celine Dion is going to try to sing. This isn't a setup for a joke. She's had a viral infection for the last several...
No Friends, Not Even in Low Places
Byline: Steve Friess The last time O. J. Simpson was in Las Vegas, he spent his first night at the stylish Palms hotel-casino, and his last in the county jail. He's scheduled to return to Sin City this week for a pretrial hearing on his armed-robbery...
Not Semi-Soldiers
Byline: Anna Quindlen It's no longer a question of whether women should be in combat. It's a matter of the regulations catching up with the reality. When Leigh Ann Hester came home from Iraq she put grenade pins on her key ring. They were souvenirs...
Our Great Recession Obsession
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson No one likes the side effects of a recession: higher unemployment, weaker profits. But slumps are inevitable, and they do have some benefits. We are all waiting, it seems, for the next recession. Everyone knows that...
Perspectives
"Basically, that's a potential death sentence, and you know it. Who will raise our children if we are dead or seriously wounded?" Senior diplomat Jack Croddy, on the State Department's decision to force Foreign Service officers to take assignments...
Please Remove the Boob Tube
Byline: Allison Wood; Wood lives in Chapel Hill, N.C. Note to merchants: I don't need a TV to baby-sit me while I wait. Daydreaming is just fine, thank you. Last week I stepped into a typically crowded post office, but there was no idle chatter...
Portrait of the Tyrant as A Young Man
Byline: Andrew Nagorski A telling new account of Stalin's childhood depicts a streetwise thug raised in conflict. On June 26, 1907, a stagecoach guarded by Cossacks and carrying the equivalent of about $3.4 million to the State Bank in the Georgian...
Putting Faith in A 'Black Chick from Brooklyn'
Byline: Eve Conant Democrats want to steal religious voters, and they're looking to a Pentecostal pastor for help. It sounds like the start of a Woody Allen joke: an evangelical, a Catholic, a Jew and a Muslim are sitting around a table talking...
Renewable Optimism
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Mariane Pearl, the wife of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, resolved to hold onto her sense of hope in the aftermath of her husband's murder at the hands of terrorists in 2002. She wrote a stirring memoir, "A...
Rocking 'Til the Cows Come Home
Byline: Andrew Romano I flubbed a few chords. But I saw why Huckabee's a hit. Mike Huckabee is having a rock-star moment. It's 5 p.m. on a recent Friday when the former Arkansas governor, onstage at the near-empty Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake,...
Served Rare, with Passion
Byline: Julia Reed I love steak. I was born in Greenville, Miss., home of the legendary Doe's Eat Place, where, I am told, I ate my first bite of solid food. It was a piece of rare porterhouse on my mother's fork, bathed in drippings the color of...
Sorry, but I Can't Help You
Byline: Jerry Adler One study found that, in doctors, the brain circuits associated with empathy were suppressed. How would you like to cure cancer? Careful, it's a trick question. You might win a Nobel Prize, along with the gratitude of countless...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham He is always in motion. Last Thursday evening, in Washington's ornate Union Station on Capitol Hill, New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg spoke to a dinner for Conservation International on how to address climate change. The glittery...
The Hillary Paper Chase: 3,022,030 Documents to Go
Byline: Michael Isikoff During last week's democratic presidential debate, Hillary Clinton faced tough questions about why so many of her papers at her husband's presidential library in Little Rock, Ark., are still secret -- and her answers have...
The Other Man from Hope
Byline: Holly Bailey Mike Huckabee's winning converts by cultivating a regular-guy image. It's hard not to like Mike Huckabee. Next to his better known, better-funded rivals -- Mitt Romney, a candidate so carefully groomed and scripted that he...
The Pride of Frankenstein
Byline: Nicki Gostin And Cathleen McGuigan The last show Mel Brooks produced in his lab was a monster smash. Now comes a show about a monster. Some guy may have said there are no second acts in American life, but in a Mel Brooks musical, there's...
The Revolutionary
He has the money and the message to upend 2008. Michael Bloomberg's American odyssey. Michael Bloomberg was just a year old when, in 1943, the author Esther Forbes published a children's novel, "Johnny Tremain," the tale of a young Revolutionary-era...
The Search for A Candidate
Byline: Steven Levy; With Jennifer Ordonez McCain's people say that every dollar they spend on online search advertising brings in three or four bucks. The national polls don't reflect it, but in one sense John McCain is the clear front runner...
The Writing on the Wall
Byline: Raina Kelley Good penmanship is more than just a quaint skill. A new study shows that it's a key part of learning. For most people, the written thank-you is your best bet for an expression of warm, heartfelt thanks. The last thing you...
This Won't Be the Iraq Election
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Petraeus's new strategy is working, though not exactly for the reasons initially advertised. The Presidential campaign has jostled this way and that, contenders have risen and fallen, but the one fixture in the political...
Three-Star Snacks in Aisle Five
Byline: Anne Underwood It's a modern paradox. As health claims proliferate on packaged foods, it often seems harder to find the good stuff. A smattering of whole grains, for example, doesn't make a sugary cereal nutritious. But short of spending...
'What She Can't Do Is Have It Both Ways'
Byline: Howard Fineman And Richard Wolffe In an interview with NEWSWEEK, Barack Obama says the Democratic front runner is 'disingenuous.' There is a sense of urgency at Sen. Barack Obama's headquarters in a steel-and-glass office tower in downtown...
Who Needs Preschool?
Byline: Anna Kuchment Allegra and Eric Lowitt toured several preschools and child-care centers in 2006 before finding the right match for their daughter, Dana, now almost 3. The Lowitts, who live outside Boston, settled on Needham's Chestnut Children's...