Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 25, December 20

16 Hours in September
Byline: Dan Ephron Washington's decision to stop pushing Israel for a settlement freeze could well mean no direct peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians for months, even years; a stalemate is likely at least until Prime Minister Benjamin...
A New Reason to Worry
Byline: Ian Yarett The Food Safety Modernization Act, if it survives the political process, would strengthen the FDA and hold food producers to higher safety standards. The bill reflects a growing national concern about bacterial contamination of...
Fat Canaries in a Coal Mine
Byline: Sharon Begley Obese animals hold lessons for us. If it were just kids, we could blame obesity on the cutbacks in phys-ed classes, school vending machines that sell high-calorie junk, and the substitution of videogames for kickball. If...
Hoochie Coochie
Byline: Jesse Ellison "It's organic!" is usually a selling point at the upscale Astor Wines and Spirits in Manhattan. When Colin Spoelman says it, hawking a table of small bottles featuring vintage--chic labels from his Kings County Distillery,...
How We Can Stop Cholera
Two doctors on why there's still hope for Haiti. After decades of political violence, after being pounded by hurricanes and floods, and after the January 2010 earthquake, Haiti now faces a cholera epidemic that has so far defied all efforts to bring...
In Fed We Trust, Sometimes
Byline: Daniel Gross Bad decisions leave little room for faith. There's an old saw in the investing world: don't fight the Fed. Just as politicians shouldn't square off with people who buy ink by the barrel, investors shouldn't buck the folks...
Killing the Killers
Byline: Ronen Bergman Israeli hit teams have a history of eliminating weapons scientists. During his years as Israel's first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion was haunted by a recurring nightmare. In it, the Holocaust's survivors had taken refuge...
Making Enemies, Not Friends, in Belarus
Byline: Owen Matthews and Anna Nemtsova In his 16 years as president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko has ticked just about every box that defines a modern-day dictator. He's jailed opponents and crushed protests. His security service, still known...
Priority Check
Byline: Lisa Miller As recently as 2004, when evangelicals were credited with reelecting George W. Bush, sexual mores defined the culture wars. But as the economy has become the political priority for liberals and conservatives alike, traditional...
Tax Cutters for Truth
Byline: Ezra Klein Decoding a strange bipartisan deal. In Washington last week the temperature dipped into the 20s, which is evidently the point when hell freezes over. President Obama reached an agreement with the Republican Senate leader, who...
The Flight from Risk
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Recession's legacy stymies recovery. It is becoming clear that the Great Recession has left a deep and possibly lasting scar on the American psyche. From CEOs to ordinary families, we are a nation that is more cautious,...
The Great Predictor
Byline: Carlye Adler In 2001, after the dotcom bubble burst, technology guru Tim O'Reilly threw a party. His company, O'Reilly Media, hosted a free "un-conference" to celebrate technology--and declare that it wasn't over. This was the first of the...
The Shadow War
Byline: Christopher Dickey, R. M. Schneiderman, and Babak Dehghanpisheh; With Maziar Bahari, Ronen Bergman, and John Barry Someone Is Killing Iran's Nuclear Scientists. But A Computer Worm May Be The Scarier Threat. The covert operations that...
True Lit
Byline: Malcolm Jones Movies eclipse their literary sources all the time, which is fine when the book is 'Jaws.' But when John Wayne overshadows a master such as Charles Portis, we have a problem. When Charles Portis published True Grit in 1968,...
Uncivil Rights?
Byline: Eve Conant Gay activists are taking a cue from Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King. But are their struggles the same? Four months before Rosa Parks refused to vacate her bus seat to a white man in 1955, she attended a retreat at the Highlander...
Why Can't Vegas Stop Building?
Byline: Steve Friess and Michael Picon No place in America rivals Sin City as the epicenter of the recession. The town has crapped out, with see-through condo towers and abandoned homes as common as pasties on showgirls. Yet even as the city struggles...