Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 10

9/11 Commission: The Panel Tones It Down
Byline: Michael Isikoff Fearing that their high-profile inquiry was being dragged into election-year politics, 9/11 commission chair Tom Kean and vice chair Lee Hamilton made powerful private pleas to fellow commissioners to tone down the rhetoric...
A Better Sex Life; Loss of Sexual Verve Is a Common Problem. but There Are Lots of Solutions
Byline: Jan Shifren, M.D., and Nancy A. Ferrari, Adapted from the Harvard Women's Health Watch. For more information, go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK. Watch a few "Sex and the City" reruns or page through a women's magazine and you might think...
Alcohol's Deadly Triple Threat; Women Get Addicted Faster, Seek Help Less Often and Are More Likely to Die from the Bottle
Byline: Karen Springen and Barbara Kantrowitz, With Peg Tyre Pat Staples's childhood gave birth to the demons that nearly killed her. Her father was a volatile alcoholic. "I was physically, verbally and emotionally abused," she says. "Nose broken,...
An Unspeakable Affliction; Urinary Incontinence Mortifies Millions of Women. Luckily, It's Not a Life Sentence
Byline: May M. Wakamatsu, M.D., and Kathleen Cahill Allison, Adapted from "Better Bladder and Bowel Control," published by Harvard Medical School. The booklet is available throughhealth.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK. When you gotta go, you gotta go. But...
A Protest over Protests in New York
Byline: Sarah Childress Is the city famous for speaking its mind trying to force protesters to put a cork in it? That's the impression activists got last week when the group United for Peace and Justice was denied a permit to hold a rally for 250,000...
A Racist on the Rise; after a Post-9/11 Slump, Hate Groups See a Surge
Byline: Rebecca Sinderbrand September 11 wasn't kind to the white-power movement. After the terrorist attacks, several of the nation's largest hate groups lost members and money, and some all but collapsed after bitter internal power struggles....
Archeology: Where's the Third Buddha?
Byline: Owen Matthews For 15 centuries, before they were dynamited by the Taliban in April 2001 for being "idolatrous," two giant Buddha statues dominated the valley of Bamiyan, high in the Hindu Kush mountains of Afghanistan. Now all that is left...
Aspirin and Statins in Women: Heading off Heart Attack
Byline: Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., Paula A. Johnson, M.D., and Nancy A. Ferrari, Adapted from the Harvard Women's Health Watch and the Harvard Health Letter. For more information, go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK. Heart disease may pose a grave...
A Very Public Offering; after Months of Anticipation, the Sultans of Search Have Finally Announced Their IPO. and They're Doing It Their Way
Byline: Steven Levy, With Brad Stone in San Francisco Google is not a conventional company. We do not intend to become one." With those words, one of the chattiest, most idealistic and economically momentous "S-1" forms ever--the filing that announces...
A Worldwide Gender Gap
Byline: Kati Marton, Marton, author of "Hidden Power: Presidential Marriages That Shaped Our Recent History" (<I>Anchor Books</I>), is chair of the International Women's Health Coalition. Women suffer countless disadvantages compared...
Bush's Quiet Multilateralism; the Administration Loves Global Cooperation When It Comes to Trade. So Why Can't We Try It When Lives, and Not Just Lucre, Are on the Line?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The Bush administration has a secret multilateral side. Did you know that it routinely allows an international organization to make crucial decisions affecting the lives of all Americans? That it allows foreigners--unelected...
Chinks in Our Armor; the Army's Chief Weapons Tester Said Strykers Were Not Safe against RPGs. Then the Army Shipped Them to Iraq
Byline: Michael Hirsh Tom Christie was worried. It was the fall of 2003, and the Pentagon's chief weapons tester had noted problems with the Army's pride and joy, the new Stryker Armored Vehicle. The $4 billion program was seen as the vanguard of...
Comanche Spring, 2004; John Kerry Could Say: 'This Election Is Not about Ideology. It's about Competence.' the Trouble Is, It Has Been Said Before
Byline: George F. Will In "Lone Star Nation," his new history of the battle for Texas independence, H. W. Brands of Texas A&M writes that one particularly fierce Indian tribe called itself, as many tribes did, simply "the People," but the tribe's...
Discomfort: The Mystery of Cystitis
Byline: Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., and Carolyn Schatz, Adapted from the Harvard Women's Health Watch. For more information go to health.harvard.edu/newsweek. It's your umpteenth trip to the bathroom to empty your bladder, and the pressure still...
Don't Bail on Falling Bonds; How You Divide Your Money between Stocks and Bonds May Not Matter Much. Bonds Outdid Stocks in Eight of the Past 20 Years
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn, Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld On Wall Street today, everyone's a prophet. They're marching around in Versace robes, waving gold-leafed signs warning the end is near. The end of low interest rates, that is. And the...
Fetal Health: Planning for the Future
Byline: Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., Carolyn Schatz and Susan Pauker, M.D., Robb-Nicholson and Schatz edit the Harvard Women's Health Watch. PAUKER is a geneticist and advisory-board member of the Harvard Women's Health Watch. For more information,...
Fresh Weapons for an Old Battle; New Treatments for Breast Cancer Are Easier on Patients and More Efficient at Killing Tumors
Byline: Anne Underwood Anyone who has survived chemotherapy knows how brutal it can be. But thanks to an experimental procedure, Barbara Link, 55, of Cary, N.C., found that parts of the treatment were "actually pleasant." Her enthusiasm is all the...
Have It Your Way: Redesigning Birth; after Decades of Letting Doctors Run the Show, More Women Are Taking Big Decisions into Their Own Hands
Byline: Mary Carmichael Water birth, homebirth, HypnoBirthing--when Marion McCartney started as a nurse-midwife 30 years ago, none of those were popular, and birth was just birth. Women didn't get to choose their method of labor. If they were lucky,...
Health for Life M.D.: Our Doctor's Advice; Online Readers Sent Us Questions about Women's Medical Issues. We Asked a Harvard Doctor to Help
Byline: Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., Robb-Nicholson is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, associate physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and founding medical editor of the Harvard Women's Health Watch. She cautions...
How to Think about HT; Should You or Shouldn't You? Our Experts Clarify the Data on Hormone Therapy and Menopause
Byline: Nananda Col, M.D., and Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D., For more information on hormone therapy, including recommendations about books and an interactive Web site, go to health.harvard.edu/newsweek. It used to be easy. Hormone therapy offered...
Intelligence: A Double Game; Has Chalabi Given 'Sensitive' Information on U.S. Interests to Iran? He Denies It, but the White House Is Wary
Byline: Mark Hosenball Ahmad Chalabi, the longtime Pentagon favorite to become leader of a free Iraq, has never made a secret of his close ties to Iran. Before the U.S. invasion of Baghdad, Chalabi's Iraqi National Congress maintained a $36,000-a-month...
Kerry's Latest Colors; Banner Waves: John Kerry's Upriver, under Siege. Is His Plan to Take It to Bush on National Security a Masterstroke, or a Fool's Errand? the Democrat's Path out of the Hot Zone
Byline: Howard Fineman and T. Trent Gegax Sen. John Kerry has been a man under fire. In a choreographed attack, Republicans last week ambushed him with a 33-year-old leaked videotape (unearthed in the National Archives) and bombed him with $5 million...
Maintaining Heart Health: What Tests Can Tell You
Byline: Paula A. Johnson, M.D., Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., and Nancy A. Ferrari, Adapted from the Harvard Women's Health Watch and the Harvard Heart Letter. For more information, go to health.harvard.edu/newsweek. You probably know your total...
Moderation: If You Want to Cut Back
Byline: Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., and Carolyn Schatz, Adapted from the Harvard Women's Health Watch. For more information on alcohol use, see health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK. A little alcohol can do wonders for a meal or a social gathering, and...
My Morning Run Is A Moving Meditation; Competitiveness Gets Me out the Door, but It's the Peace I Feel That Keeps Me Pounding the Pavement
Byline: Peggy Duffy, Duffy lives in Centreville, Va. My sister has lost several toenails over the years. "It's a consequence of running," she told me while recounting her latest training woes. She holds this fact up like a merit badge. She averages...
Newsmakers
Byline: Dorothy Kalins Q&A: Jacques Pepin Superstar Chef Jacques Pepin calls his best-selling memoir, just appearing in paperback, "The Apprentice." Not because he beat out rivals for 16 weeks to get a $250K gig, but because he started cooking...
No Time for Wrinkles; Women Have More Beauty-Treatment Choices Than Ever. Is That a Good Thing?
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Alisa Kauffman has been practicing dentistry for nearly two decades, but some new patients still mistake the petite, 44-year-old New Yorker for a dental-school student. "I tell them it's just the Botox." But the popular...
Opinion: Going Public? Bad Idea. Google Held off for Years before Finally Giving in to Pressure to Sell Stock to outside Investors. the Case for Staying Private
Byline: Allan Sloan Boy, the guys running Google are really making a mistake by taking the company public. Yeah, I understand that employees and venture capitalists are agitating to have a stock they can sell. But no matter how high-minded and determined...
Out for Blood; Summer's First Blockbuster, 'Van Helsing,' Arrives to Nasty Web Reviews and Sniping from Rival Studios. but Can Buzz Actually Drive a Stake through Its Heart?
Byline: Sean Smith, With Carla Power in Prague The city of Prague is elegant and intimate, whispering of hidden charms and quiet mysteries. "Van Helsing," which was shot there, is not. Directed by Stephen Sommers, who made "The Mummy" and "The Mummy...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources From Top To Bottom, Left To Right: CNN, Los Angeles Times, Daily Collegian, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Associated Press, New York Times, The Hill, Baltimore Sun, Boston Globe, Associated Press "That's not the way...
Pick Me: The New Job Hunt
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Officially, the country has been out of recession since November 2001, but it sure doesn't feel that way for many Americans. The unemployment rate is down to 5.7 percent, but some 8.4 million Americans are still out of work--and...
Putting It All Together; New Medical Research Shows How Different from Men Women Really Are. Take Heart Disease: Female Symptoms Are More Subtle and Often Get Overlooked. What to Watch for, What to Do
Byline: Claudia Kalb and Karen Springen, With Joan Raymond Like most women, Kathy Cunningham, 49, a wife, mother and senior VP at a Chicago bank, was well acquainted with the emotional chambers in her heart. Joy, sadness, love. But Cunningham never...
Rough Justice in Iraq; Exclusive: As Alarming Details Surface in a Growing Prisoner-Abuse Scandal, the U.S. General Who Was in Charge Talks about What Went Wrong
Byline: Rod Nordland and John Barry, With Melinda Liu and Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski is angry. She says she warned her superiors from the first about the ill-treatment of Iraqi prisoners. As commander of the Army Reserve's...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Every once in a while we publish an issue that becomes a "keeper" for our readers. That's what happened in 1999 when we released a Special Edition on women's health. Subscribers and newsstand buyers alike wrote us to say they...
The More Social Sex; Why Do Women Form More Powerful Friendships Than Men? It's All about Survival
Byline: Anna Kuchment Western culture is filled with examples of heroic male friendships. Lewis and Clark opened up the American West. James Watson and Francis Crick unveiled the DNA double helix, the secret of life. Crime-fighting duos from the...
The Witmer Sisters: 'She Had a Job to Do'
Byline: Hilary Shenfeld After Michelle Witmer was killed in combat in Iraq on April 9, her sisters, Charity, 20, and Rachel, 24--also members of the Wisconsin National Guard--agonized over whether to return to the war zone or ask for reassignment...
Wall Street: Playing by Google Rules; Investment Bankers Pulled out All the Stops to Get the Internet Company's Business. Goldman Sachs Pulled out One Too Many
Byline: Charles Gasparino When executives at Google went looking for Wall Street investment bankers to underwrite the company's massive initial public offering, they laid down strict terms of engagement: bring us new ideas on how to sell the deal...
Women, Cigarettes and Death; More Women Die of Lung Cancer Than Any Other Kind. Smokers, Beware
Byline: Karen Springen Quick--what's the leading cancer killer of women? If you answered "breast cancer," you're not alone--but you're wrong. Lung cancer is far deadlier. Its five-year survival rate is 15 percent, compared with 86 percent for breast...