Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 14

A Generation's Leading Edge
***** CORRECTION: In 'A Generation's Leading Edge,' which identified the boomers in our cover montage, we said Jann Wenner launched Rolling Stone magazine in 1975. In fact, it was 1967. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** CORRECTION APPENDED...
Bad Dates in Baghdad; Romance May Be the Last Thing to Die in War-Torn Iraq
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Mohammed Hayder in Basra) Omar Hussein was driving with his girlfriend in Baghdad one evening this summer when a big SUV with tinted windows cut them off. Another vehicle with tinted windows, this one a pickup truck,...
Bedroom V. Courtroom; Instead of Fostering an Atmosphere in Which Government Was Agnostic on Abortion, Roe V. Wade Fomented One in Which It Became Activist
Byline: Anna Quindlen Samuel Alito has heard hundreds of cases during his long tenure on the court of appeals, but the interested members of the American public are now likely familiar with a single one. It is the dissent in which Judge Alito ruled...
Bigger, Faster, Longer; Any Tycoon Can Plop Down $600,000 for a Mercedes SLR. A New Breed of Thrill Seeker Wants to Be Able to Go Where Others Can't. and to Do It with Panache
Byline: Michael Hastings And Walter Alarkon Steve Fossett's fastest toys don't fit in his garage. That's impressive when you consider what he does keep under the roof at his oceanfront mansion in southern California: a $205,000 Ferrari 465 GT and...
Big Guys Win Again. This Is Tax Reform?
Byline: Allan Sloan There are shelves all over Washington groaning under the weight of blue-ribbon-committee reports that made a big initial splash, then sank into obscurity. Many people predict just that fate for the report that emerged last week...
Can We Go Home Now? Wherever Bush Travels, Questions about Rove Follow
Byline: Howard Fineman (With Holly Bailey and Richard Wolffe) A homebody by nature, and often unsteady in unscripted public situations, George W. Bush is no fan of high-profile presidential travel. Especially now. With job-approval ratings south...
Capital Ideas; Handling Your Entire Mortgage Online Can Save You Money
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn If you're buying a house, you've probably checked mortgage rates online. You'll call a bank or mortgage broker and ask for a loan at that same price. But why not handle the whole transaction online? It often gets you a...
Cheney in the Bunker; Bloodied but Unbowed, the Veep Has a New Number Two. Game On
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff As usual, Dick Cheney insisted on doing business behind closed doors. Last Tuesday, Senate Republicans were winding up their weekly luncheon in the Capitol when the vice president rose to speak. Staffers...
Enrollment Roulette
Byline: LINDA STERN It's that time of year when workers choose their health-insurance plans for 2006, and if you think "open season" refers to your wallet, you're not wrong. Employers are heaping bigger premiums, more copays and higher deductibles...
Freedom Is Not Enough; Malawi Got Free Elections and a Free Press More Than a Decade Ago, but Food Crises Have Only Grown Worse
Byline: Joshua Hammer Josiah Masiamphoka is tired of being a beggar. But the subsistence farmer and father of six lives in Malawi, where the rains have again failed to fall. The first time Masiamphoka was forced to take handouts was in 1994, when...
Get Me out of This Line! It's Still Typically Free to Be a Frequent Flier. but 'Paid Loyalty Programs' Are Now All the Rage at the Car-Rental Counter, at Hotels and Even in Some Stores
Byline: Daniel McGinn When I need a rental car for a business trip, I give NEWSWEEK's travel agent a simple directive: "Whatever's cheapest." I'm not enough of a road warrior to be loyal to a particular rental brand, and I don't care whether they...
How I'm Investing Now; It Can Be Tough Finding Decent Returns in This Directionless Stock Market. NEWSWEEK's Wall Street Editor Offers a Peek Inside His Portfolio, Including Hits, Misses and a Miscue
Byline: Allan Sloan It's been a long time since I've written about the stock market, because the market has been... well, boring this year. Stocks have had daily overreactions to oil prices, consumer-confidence surveys and hurricane hits and misses,...
Hyped over Skype; the Dynamic Duo of Internet Phone Service Now Have to Make Good after Their Billion-Dollar Deal with eBay
Byline: Rana Foroohar and Daniel McGinn In a back alley in London's SoHo district--amid the seedy sex shops, comic-book stores and coffee joints--you'll find the humble headquarters of one of the world's most important telecommunications companies....
Hypochondria: Maybe I Am Sorta Itchy
Byline: Bret Begun Been having trouble sleeping? Agitated? It's probably nothing--unless it's fatal familial insomnia. Rogue proteins attack your thalamus, preventing you from sleeping and ultimately killing you. But wait; there's more! The disease...
Intel Probe: The Yellowcake Mystery
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball The FBI ended a two-and-a-half-year probe into the Niger uranium documents without resolving a key mystery: who forged papers used to bolster President Bush's case for war in Iraq? The bureau announced...
Investing in AIDS Testing; Is OraSure's Oral Swab Right for Use at Home?
Byline: Martha Brant OraSure Technologies CEO Douglas Michels walks softly and carries a small stick. Actually, the stick is a white, plastic HIV test that uses oral fluid, is quick and has been approved by the FDA for use by health-care workers--and...
Keeping It Real; the Left Fears Him. the Right Loves Him. Why Both Sides Don't Quite Get Samuel Alito
Byline: Stuart Taylor Jr. and Evan Thomas (With T. Trent Gegax, Richard Wolffe, Pat Wingert, Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Martha Brant and Steve Tuttle Graphic by Andrew Romano and Karl Gude) For many intellectuals, the ideal of Blind Justice, impartially...
Mail Call
Racing to Prevent the Spread of Bird Flu Readers shared their concerns on the growing worldwide threat of avian flu, the subject of our Oct. 31 cover story. One said, "In this [increasingly] globalized world, where boundaries seem more and more...
More Fun for Your Mobile; Forget Mere Ringtones. 'Mobile Media' Have Arrived
Byline: Brad Stone Nearly 200 million American mobile-phone subscribers have lots of great ways to waste time these days. Sprint customers with the latest phones can watch replays of key moments from NFL games, unless they're too busy downloading...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin Seven Things* I'd Rather Talk About... Than the Men in (or Out) of My Life By Jennifer Aniston 1 My new movie, "Derailed." It's a really sexy psychological thriller with Clive Owen. I had never done a thriller before....
Once Unique, Soon a Place like Any Other; It's Heartbreaking to Watch the Appalachia I Love Disappear under Endless Condos and Cabins
Byline: Abe Whaley (Whaley lives in Knoxville, Tenn.) I grew up in the mountains of East Tennessee, on a modest farm where we raised a lot of what we ate, watched sunsets on the porch and had supper together every night. For nine generations, mine...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, Times Online (London), New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, MSNBC, People, AP "With respect, Your Honor, I plead not guilty." ...
Pssst. Nobody Loves a Torturer; Ask Any American Soldier in Iraq When the General Population Really Turned against the United States and He Will Say, "Abu Ghraib."
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) As President Bush's approval ratings sink at home, the glee across the globe rises. He remains the most unpopular political figure in the world, and newspapers from Europe...
Qaeda Prison Break; Four Arab Captives, Including a Top Terror Operative, Manage to Slip through Three Rings of Security
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With John Barry and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Joe Cochrane in Bangkok, Sami Yousafzai in Pakistan and Ron Moreau in Sri Lanka) Bagram Airbase is home to one of the most heavily fortified military prisons in the world....
Rage on Rue Picasso; Will the Riots Swell the Ranks of Jihadists in Europe?
Byline: Christopher Dickey (With Tracy McNicoll in Clichy-sous-Bois and Eric Pape in Sevran) Word of the deaths spread quickly through Clichy-sous-Bois, a grim collection of housing projects an hour by train and bus from the center of Paris. Two...
Serial Entrepreneurs
The Skype lads are only the latest to repeat their success in creating a business or technology. A roundup of some others: Sir Richard Branson, 55 Founder of the Virgin empire, Branson is also a British celebrity, owing to his sportsman adventures....
Tales from Travelers; Our Readers Continue to Tell Us How They Endure the World of Business Travel. More Stories from the Front
RONI HARBERT Denver, Colo. I was on a three-hour flight, seated on the aisle and working on my laptop, when an airline attendant spilled a liter of water on my computer. I could go on about how the attendant didn't apologize and the airline made...
Terrorism: A Threat on D.C.?
Byline: Mark Hosenball Having been burned by false alarms in Baltimore and New York, federal and local authorities last week played down intel that a jihadist network with connections in London and Bosnia might have been plotting to attack D.C....
The Beat Goes on; Satellite and Internet Radio Are Helping to Save Niche Genres of Music
Byline: Malcolm Beith A year ago it was difficult to find a nightclub in Latin America that wasn't pulsating to "Gasolina," a raunchy number by reggaeton star Daddy Yankee. Bootleg CDs of the tune were on sale at street stalls from Santo Domingo...
The Boomer Files; Hitting 60: The Generation That Vowed to Stay Forever Young Is Coming Up on a Major Milestone. but for the 3.4 Million Americans Who Were Born in 1946, Retirement Is a Distant Prospect, and Life Still Holds Plenty of Promise and Surprises. They've Been Hippies and Yuppies; Now It's the Time of the 'Abbies': Aging Baby Boomers
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Pat Wingert in Washington, Karen Springen, Jamie Reno, Allison Samuels, Joan Raymond and William Lee Adams. Research by Ruth Tenenbaum, Anthony Skaggs and Sam Register) It was quite a journey, wasn't it? In one year, 1946,...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Did you ever wonder where the term "baby boom" comes from? Well, according to our research for this week's cover story, The Washington Post (our esteemed sister publication) first used it to describe the postwar birth surge...
The Olympics: Time to Meet the Johnsons
Byline: Bret Begun In the month after the 2002 Winter Games in Salt Lake City, the roughly 140 U.S. curling clubs welcomed about 5,000 newcomers, reports the U.S. Curling Association. Since then, membership's up 15 to 20 percent. So there you have...
The Politics of Playtime; A Grass-Roots Revolt against American Girl Dolls Gathers Steam
Byline: Susannah Meadows (With Karen Springen) Tracie and Richard Cross have four daughters, who have seven American Girl dolls between them. Every time a new American Girl catalog arrives at their Ft. Worth, Texas, home, the girls fight over who...
These Little Piggies; Forget Bacon Strips. the Company That Brought Kobe Beef to America Now Wants You to Try Kurobuta Pork
Byline: Jennifer Barrett You may not yet have heard of Kurobuta pork. But if Snake River Farms can do for Kurobuta what it did for another exotic and expensive meat, you'll soon be seeing the pure-bred pork on the shelf of your local gourmet grocery...
The Times They Are A-Changin'; Why I Stand Apart from My Generation. as Far Apart as Possible
Byline: Albert Brooks (Albert Brooks is an actor, writer and director. His new movie, "Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World," follows the travels of a comedian named Albert Brooks who's sent by the United States government to India and Pakistan to...
The Wages of War; Old Soldiers Know the Human Price of Battle. What History Teaches Us about How Vets Truly Think
Byline: Jonathan Darman Italy, late May 1944. The allied army advanced on Rome and suffered a brutal counterattack. Hunkered down near the beaches of Anzio, a 23-year-old Army private from Oak Ridge, Tenn., sent a despondent letter home. "Take a...
Tracking Disease; Changing the Environment Changes the Way Viruses Evolve and Spread. A Leading Wildlife Biologist Explains How This Knowledge Can Prevent Future Outbreaks
Byline: Anne Underwood Protection of the environment often seems like a low-priority issue when stacked up against more immediate concerns. But a healthy environment is no mere luxury, says Mary Pearl, president of the Wildlife Trust. It is a prerequisite...
Wal-Mart Hits the Wall; the No. 1 Retailer Always Had Reasons to Smile. Now PR Problems and a Falling Stock Are Giving It Headaches
Byline: Daniel McGinn (With Susanna Schrobsdorff and Nicole Joseph) Andrew Grossman was in his office at Wal-Mart Watch, opening the mail one day in September, when he came across a plain manila envelope with no return address. Inside he found a...
Wired, at Any Price; South Korea Presents a Paradox. It Leads in High-Speed Connections. but Profits Are Another Matter
Byline: B. J. Lee It's no surprise that South Korean phone companies have been among the first to move into the music and film businesses. The country, as its boosters never tire of mentioning, leads the world in broadband penetration--three in...
Worry While You Spend; What Explains the Gap between Americans' Glum Mood and Their Free-Spending Ways? How about a Hangover from the 1990s Boom?
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson One puzzle these days is why Americans are so confident at the shopping mall and so glum in opinion polls. By many measures, the country's prosperity is broad-based. Families are buying and renovating homes at a ferocious...
Would You Buy a Quad from This Man? Ed Whitacre, Head of SBC (Soon to Be AT&T), Is a Telecom Vet with His Eye on Even Bigger Things
Byline: Steven Levy When you're trying to morph a telecom giant into a primary force in the media world, you need a weightier moniker than SBC. Apparently that's what CEO Ed Whitacre believed. He recently announced that when his $16 billion purchase...