Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 13

Awaiting the Almighty; Rudy Giuliani May or May Not Run for President. but He's Having a Heavenly Time Thinking about It
Byline: Howard Fineman If you're a republican who wants to be president, the place to be this weekend is Memphis's Peabody Hotel, with its parading ducks--and politicians. Unless, of course, you're Rudy Giuliani. In that case, you skip the Southern...
BlackBerry Deal: Patently Absurd; It's like a Judge in a Murder Case Pondering Execution While Ignoring New DNA Evidence
Byline: Steven Levy What is the value of a bunch of discredited patents? We found out last week when Research in Motion (RIM), the company that makes the beloved BlackBerry, paid a company called NTP $612.5 million to settle a claim that it infringed...
Breaking Up Is Hard to Do; Interview: David Chase, Who Created 'The Sopranos,' Now Has to Pour Its Cement Overcoat. How? Well, He Hasn't Written It Yet
Byline: Marc Peyser Finales can be so tricky--just ask the creators of "Seinfeld." But how do you whack Tony Soprano himself, not to mention what is arguably the most significant TV drama of the century? The job has fallen to "Sopranos" creator...
Bright Side of the Moon; Forget That Black Outfit-David Gilmour Has Mellowed
Byline: Lorraine Ali When the members of Pink Floyd reunited--after 22 years--to play last year's Live 8 benefit concert, the buzz around these rock senior citizens upstaged the appearances by Mariah, Madonna and even the controversial Kanye. "It's...
Detroit Muscles Up; Hold the Obit! Motown Finds Some New Life by Reviving Its Monster Hits of the Motorway
Byline: Keith Naughton GM chief designer Ed Welburn sweeps into his Chevrolet design studio and it's as if he were stepping back in time. On one side of the cavernous white room, designers huddle over a silver retro remake of the Chevy Camaro. A...
Food News Blues; Fat Is Bad, but Good Fat Is Good. What about Fish? Wine? Nuts? A New Appetite for Answers Has Put Science on a Collision Course with the Media
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Claudia Kalb (With Anne Underwood and Pat Wingert) You couldn't miss the headlines. The New York Times: low-fat diet does not cut health risks, study finds. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: reducing fat may not curb...
Heck of a Prob, Brownie; 'The Da Vinci Code' Publisher Is Sued in the U.K
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan With Ginanne Brownell If you've read "The Da Vinci Code," you know author Dan Brown loved planting anagrams as clues in his best-selling thriller. But when he named a scholarly British character Sir Leigh Teabing, little...
Katrina's Latest Damage; Crime Is Up. Schools Are Overcrowded. Hospitals Are Jammed. Houston Welcomed a Flood of Hurricane Evacuees with Open Arms. but Now the City Is Suffering from a Case of 'Compassion Fatigue.'
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Richard Wolffe, Mark Hosenball and Sarah Childress) In the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, Houston earned a loving moniker among many of the evacuees who sought refuge there: the Big Heart. This, after all, was the...
Let States Be Entrepreneurs; Competition between States Concentrates Their Minds on This: Capital Goes Where It Is Welcome and Stays Where It Is Well Treated
Byline: George F. Will Last week the Supreme Court heard arguments for and against the proposition that "entrepreneurial federalism" is unconstitutional. No one used that phrase, but it captures what the court is pondering: When states compete to...
Letters to the Magazine; Issue Dated March 13, 2006
Cheney's Hunting Mishap Nearly 350 readers responded to our Feb. 27 cover story on Dick Cheney's shooting accident. Some found the Veep's handling of the situation telling. "The arrogance Cheney showed in this incident demonstrates what is taking...
Love in a Time of Madness; A Sunni and a Shiite Fall in Love in Iraq. They Get Married, Have Kids. Then Muslim Extremists Start a Religious Bloodbath. What Should a Mixed Family Do?
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh, Rod Nordland and Michael Hastings The two Iraqi teachers met as students at the University of Baghdad. They flirted between classes and hid the romance from friends and family. The furtive nature of their courting was...
Married to a Mob; HBO's New Season Is All about Family Values-From Tony and His Brood to a Polygamous Dad in Utah and His Three Wives
Byline: Marc Peyser "The Sopranos" may be the greatest TV drama of the 21st century--pipe down, "West Wing" fans--but it hasn't been above relying on conventions, especially at the beginning of a season. A new bad guy will arrive, fresh out of the...
'Netbangers,' Beware; Street Gangs Are Going Online to Compare Notes and Pick Fights. but the Cops Are Right Behind Them
Byline: Daren Briscoe With a seasoned cop's knowing eye, Lake Worth, Fla., police agent Brian Hermanson cruised recently through some known gang hangouts. He was soon onto potential trouble: someone rolling through the neighborhood in a blue Lincoln...
New Math for College Costs; We're Seeing More 'Sorting' by Income and Class in American Education. the Average Private College Is Trolling for Students Who Can Pay
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Higher education just got more expensive. Under the new federal budget, interest rates will rise on student loans. Many lenders will start charging students higher fees, as well. College...
New Rules for Nukes; as Bush Pens a Nuclear Deal with India, Pakistan's Musharraf Is Keeping His 'Strategic Options Open.'
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With Ron Moreau in Islamabad and Holly Bailey traveling with the president) George W. Bush doesn't seem to have many friends in Pakistan. To greet him on his visit last week, Islamic and secular political parties came to an...
Newsmakers: Conan O'Brien, Anna Nicole Smith
Byline: Nicki Gostin (David Gates) This Friday, Conan O'Brien airs his fantastic Finnish jaunt, where he hobnobbed with his look-alike, Finnish President Tarja Halonen. He spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. How did this all start? It was...
'Nigeria Could Feed Africa'; They Lost Everything in Zimbabwe. but a Hardy Bunch of White Farmers Is Making a New Start
Byline: Joshua Hammer The sun is rising over the maize fields of Kwara state in western Nigeria, and Graham Hatty has already been up for hours. Bouncing in his Indian-made jeep down a track that borders his property, Hatty points out a pair of...
Our Grief Doesn't Make Us Experts; Politicians and Reporters Seek out Our Opinions, but What We Really Know about Is How to Survive Loss
Byline: Nikki Stern (Stern lives in Princeton, N.J.) We hear so much about "moral authority" these days, but do we know what it means? We might assume it's a quality ascribed to individuals who can provide clarity on the ethical, social or moral...
Perspectives; Issue Dated March 13, 2006
"We are fully prepared." President George W. Bush, in a leaked video recording of high-level government deliberations the day before Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans "We have our job cut out for us." Joe Madeira, director at Chicago's new...
Separating Fact from Fantasy; It's the President Who Needs to Learn from His Mistakes. Hindsight May Not Be the Only Wisdom, but It's Better Than Operating in the Dark
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Watching what's happening in Iraq right now, with Shias and Sunnis polarized, hostile and increasingly violent, it is easy to conclude that this is all a product of ancient hatreds and that Iraq will inevitably descend into...
Spain-The Next Italy
Byline: Jerry Adler In Catalonia, on the northeast coast of Spain, it is said that a fish swims three times: in water when it's alive, in oil as it's cooked and then in the wine that washes it down. For the fish, we are suggesting chef Andy Nusser's...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker The writer and editor of this week's cover story have something else in common: they both grew up in families of scientists and doctors. Barbara Kantrowitz 's father is a physicist and her mother was a biochemist; she has an...
Washington: The Next Storms; the Bush Crew Thought Katrina Had Died Down. Guess Again
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Mark Hosenball (With Holly Bailey and Eleanor Clift) The president's aides thought they had a lock on the headlines. George W. Bush had just embarked on his Asian tour with a surprise visit to Kabul. Within hours he would...
Watchdog: What Ever Happened to the Civil Liberties Board?
Byline: Michael Isikoff For more than a year, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board has been the most invisible office in the White House. Created by Congress in December 2004 as a result of the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission,...
Yates: A New Insanity Angle
Byline: Carol Rust Did Andrea Yates, the 41-year-old mother who drowned her five children in a bathtub in 2001, coach a fellow inmate on how to build an insanity defense? That's what one witness may testify in Yates's retrial, set to begin March...