Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 12

A Case of Gender Blues; A City Manager Planning a Sex-Change Operation May Lose His Job, Reviving a Debate about Basic Rights
Byline: Lynn Waddell and Arian Campo-Flores (With Julie Scelfo) After a lifetime of agonizing over his gender identity, Steven Stanton decided to become a woman about two years ago. "It wasn't something I wanted to do," says Stanton, 48, the city...
A Life in Books: Harold Bloom
Pushed to make more-unusual choices, Yale prof Harold Bloom was willing to dispense with the Bible ("since it's gotten all mixed up with questions of belief" in what is now an "insanely religious" country), but would not budge on Shakespeare, whom...
A Mass Firing Puts Justice on the Hot Seat
Byline: Michael Isikoff The firings of eight U.S. attorneys has put the heat on top Justice Department officials--and some GOP members of Congress. The unusual mass dismissals took place late last year, but the controversy escalated last week when...
Arthur Schlesinger, 1917-2007
Byline: Jon Meacham On a Saturday evening in Georgetown in late 1946, the columnist Joe Alsop was giving a dinner at his house in the 2700 block of Dumbarton. The guests were predictably drawn from the glamorous and the powerful; Supreme Court justices,...
BeliefWatch: Good Word
Byline: Lisa Miller On the day of John F. Kennedy's funeral, Robert Kennedy wrote his eldest child, who was 12, a short note: "Dear Kathleen," it said, "you seemed to understand that Jack died and was buried today. As the oldest of the Kennedy grandchildren--you...
Bloomberg: The Waiting Game; His Billions Allow Mayor Mike to Enter the'08 Race Late
Byline: Eleanor Clift In the aftermath of 9/11, nobody thought he could fill Rudy Giuliani's shoes. But under billionaire Michael Bloomberg, New York City's Democrat-turned-Republican mayor, the city rebounded. He's overseen a continued decline...
Camp Deathly Hallows?
Byline: Joshua Alston Jill Kleinman closed her children's bookstore to operate a summer camp, so she thought her days of catering to young bibliophiles and their parents were over. But last month "I got a call from a parent who wants to pull his...
Changes in Patents May Be Pending; 'Patent Trolls' Come out of the Woodwork after Companies Have Spent Billions on a Product
Byline: Steven Levy Jon Dudas's flight was canceled, so he didn't make the first day of last week's Tech Policy Summit held in San Jose, Calif. Just as well. One of the subjects of the day was patents, and he could not have avoided hearing the familiar...
Comin' through! Toyota Is on Track to Pass General Motors This Year as the World's No. 1 Auto Company. How GM Plans to Fight Back
Byline: Keith Naughton and Allan Sloan (With Christian Caryl in Toyota City, Japan, and Akiko Kashiwagi in Tokyo) General Motors and Toyota were once neck-and-neck when it came to developing high-mileage gasoline-electric hybrid cars. About a decade...
Dear Satu: Letters Tell the Story of Our Lives; for 40 Years, a Note from My Pen Pal Could Make My Day. at Last I Met the Woman Behind the Words
Byline: Rey de La Cruz (De La Cruz lives in Glenview, Ill.) Satu gave me a big hug and said, "It wasn't so hard to recognize you." Satu Vaverka and I had been writing each other since 1966, when we were 11 or 12 years old, and had exchanged so many...
Hidden Risks; Rare but Often Serious Complications Continue to Plague the Most Common Laparoscopic Operation
Byline: Mary Carmichael When surgeons removed Carol Hurlburt's diseased gallbladder in 2005, they had to cut a long, gory incision in her abdomen, and she was still hurting when her husband developed his own gallbladder infection a month later....
Kabul's Peril; A Suicide Bomber Hits the Center of U.S. Force in South Asia-And the Taliban's Spring Offensive Is Yet to Come
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Sami Yousafzai (With Holly Bailey with Cheney and Ron Moreau) Dick Cheney was cool and collected, just as he had been on that September morning five years before when two Secret Service agents burst into his White House...
Longfellow: A Founder; That His 200th Birthday Passed Unremarked Is Redundant Evidence of This Forward-Leaning Democracy's Historical Amnesia
Byline: George F. Will One hundred years ago, Feb. 27 was enlivened by events around the nation commemorating what had happened 100 years before that, in 1807. But last week's bicentennial of the birth of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow passed largely...
Master of Disaster
Byline: Jonathan Darman (With Susannah Meadows, Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff, Eve Conant, Sarah Childress, Andrew Romano and Jonathan Mummolo) Rudy Giuliani had been speaking for six minutes before anyone in the audience thought to clap, which...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: AP, Baltimore Sun, San Francisco Chronicle, Reuters, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, New York Times, AP (2) "He's not yet martyred." Taliban commander Mullah Dadullah, in a recently aired interview...
Secrets, Lies and Love; Her Father Was a Spy and His Mother Was a Nun. Two New Family Memoirs Join a Revealing Series That Probes the Past
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz A few years ago, just as her father was about to disappear into the fog of dementia, journalist Lucinda Franks stumbled upon a small box in a corner of his dilapidated apartment. The contents shocked her. Beneath some...
Silence of the Sadrists; So Far the Mahdi Army Is Lying Low. but for How Long?
Byline: Rod Nordland (With Ayad Obeidi in Baghdad and bureau reports) Early in the latest u.s. and Iraqi attempt to bring peace to Baghdad, one high-ranking Iraqi official included Moqtada al-Sadr in his prayers. "Allah, lo yehdih, lo yedahdih,...
Soul on Ice, and a Twist; Singer Amy Winehouse Is a Mess. Lucky for Us
Byline: Joshua Alston Amy Winehouse takes a while to warm up to new people, and until she does, she stammers--badly. "I'm. Really. Sorry," she says, pausing for what seems like a minute between each word. "It'll. Go away. Once I. Relax." This hardly...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Whenever Arthur Schlesinger Jr., who died last week at age 89, was asked whether individuals or abstract forces play the larger role in shaping history, he would propose a speculative scenario. In the early 1930s, Winston Churchill...
The Gospel of Prothero; A Boston University Professor Argues That Americans, Though 'Spiritual,' Are Woefully Ignorant about Religion
Byline: Lisa Miller Steve Prothero is the kind of professor who makes you want to go back to college. During an hour lecture of his Boston University course "Death and Immortality," 200 students sat rapt last week as his train of thought led him...
The Great Sorority Purge; When a Group of 'Sisters' Were Kicked out of Their Chapter House, Many Blamed Hair Color and Dress Size
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Raina Kelley in Greencastle, Ind., and Hilary Shenfeld in Chicago) In all honesty, Carolyn Thatcher, a senior theater major at DePauw University, doesn't see how she fell short of the standards of a Delta Zeta sorority...
The Sky Isn't Falling in China; the Day after the Shanghai Stock Market Fell, We Saw Again All the Same Warnings about the Chinese System and the Odds of Its Collapse
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) For some years economists and analysts have been wondering what it would take to scare financial markets. Wars, coups, soaring commodity prices, increased energy costs, unwinding...
The Street Turns Green; Goldman Sachs Got Environmentalists to Embrace a Utility They Loved to Hate-And Sealed a $45 Billion Deal
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Believe it or not, Goldman Sachs's interest in green goes beyond its record profits. The firm chauffeurs execs in hybrid cars, and the "Green Tower," its new $2 billion headquarters rising in Manhattan, is so ecofriendly...
Try to Relax-Enjoy the Ride; Which of These Dueling Stories Will Prevail-A Good Economy or a Bad One? I'm Voting for the Better Half
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Omigosh, what does it mean? are we in for it? A recession? Just when investments finally looked good again? How can anyone trust the market? "Frank, I told you to sell those stocks!"...
What's on Your Label?
Byline: Anna Kuchment A decade ago, environmentally conscious consumers had one main label to check if they wanted to make sure the food they were buying was acceptable: organic. Today, supermarket aisles are filled with products that profess to...
Whose Art Is It? American Museums Are Returning Some of the World's Great Antiquities to Their Original Homes. Should They? A New Debate over Who Owns the Past Is Underway
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan (With Andrew Murr and Barbie Nadeau) In 1972, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art paid a record-smashing $1 million for an ancient Greek vase known as the Euphronios Krater. It was worth every penny. The krater--a 12-gallon...
Wrong Time for an Urban Cowboy? His Lead in the Polls Makes Sense, but Giuliani's Leadership Style Is out of Sync with History's Pendulum
Byline: Jonathan Alter Presidential elections are said to be about the future, but they also end up as verdicts on the past. Voters often reject the type of leadership they have recently experienced. In 1960, young JFK was the antidote to dowdy...