Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from No. 08/17/09, August 17

A College Dream Ends Too Soon
Byline: K. Gonzalez I worked hard to get into Berkeley and I worked even harder when I got there. But when my funds ran out, I had to leave. In the spring of 2008, I sat at my high-school graduation ceremony, wearing my navy-blue robes, with...
Average Athletes Who Want to Get into the Game Seeking Diversity above All
University of Texas, Austin, Texas Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT. As one of the great research universities of the world, UT isn't as well known for its recreational facilities. But their high status shouldn't be a huge surprise--the school...
Cutbacks on Campus
Byline: Matthew Philips Cancel the buses, sell the art. Welcome to budget crunch 101. University endowments are like shiny, golden nest eggs, trophies to be polished and put on display as much as they are crucial sources of funding. At least...
Develop a Testing Strategy
Let's recap the good news--you now have more flexibility when it comes to your SAT scores and what colleges will actually use to evaluate your application. Ideally, this takes some of the anxiety out of the test-day experience and helps ensure you...
Finding the Right College for You
Byline: Jay Mathews Actually, the hard part is finding yourself. The rest is kind of fun. The smartest guidance counselors and college consultants figured out long ago that getting students into the most selective colleges was a fool's game....
From Cow Pasture to Campus
Byline: Mark Starr How one parent guided his daughter's college search. When I was deciding where to go to college, way back before the Age of Aquarius, I applied to six distinguished colleges--none of which I had ever visited. By April, the...
Get Famous! Right Now! Do It Online!
Byline: Jessica Bennett Andrew Mahon needed to get famous--fast. So he set up a Web site--famousandrew.com--asked people to give him suggestions, and acted out their fancy on YouTube. He videotaped himself getting his bellybutton pierced, dressed...
Green Degrees in Bloom
Byline: Sarah Kliff The environment is hot--in a good way--as schools expand course offerings and majors. When university presidents tout a commitment to "going green," they usually talk about sprucing up the physical campus--think energy-efficient...
He's Got Some Great Advice for You: Relax
Candid and surprising tips from a legendary guidance counselor. For nearly 40 years, college applicants in the New York suburbs have sought the wisdom of an extraordinary guidance counselor known as Smitty. He routinely contradicts parents and guidebooks....
How to Afford College Now
Byline: Linda Stern What's a FAFSA and why should you care? Smart strategies for navigating the money maze. It's a classic good news/bad news moment: that fat envelope in the mailbox signifies that your child's first-choice school said yes. Then...
In Search of Great Professors
Byline: Dina Fine Maron They're out there, waiting to teach you and change your life forever. There are few better fixes for insomnia than listening to a professor read her PowerPoint to you, slide by slide. And that can be a good thing, especially...
Let Go of That Ivy League Dream
Byline: Peter Vartanian Reaching is great, but be careful not to overlook a less-well-known winner. The more pragmatic choice might just turn out to be your ideal one, too. In the summer of 2008, after my junior year at Dominican High School...
Lovers of Old, Cozy Traditions Students Who Are Easily Bored
Sewanee: The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Sewanee has some modern flourishes, like calling itself a university when few of its 1,560 students are postgraduates. But compared with the majority of American liberal-arts institutions, it...
No Drinks for Them
Byline: Kurt Soller It's not just partying. Some students are alcoholics. Ask Elizabeth, a student at northwestern University, what the best part of freshman year was and she'll have one answer: the ease of procuring vodka. She drank wine coolers...
Passions, Friends, and Great Profs
Byline: Sarah Starr After you arrive on campus, the real decisions begin. For four years of high school, dreams of college life kept me persevering through what seemed like unbearable times of teenage torment. So when I got to college, I felt...
Resume Building Can Get Crazy
Byline: Hillary Neger How I went to extremes in my quest to become a well-rounded applicant. And why that might not be such a bad thing. When you're entering the college process, everyone insists that it is necessary to become this "ideal, well-rounded,...
Shy Applicants Eager to Try Everything Students with Learning Disabilities
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Most of Vassar's 2,400 undergraduates are not shy, but as one of the best-known smaller liberal-arts schools, it draws many students who think they might have trouble adjusting to a larger place. Its lack of a...
Something Else to Worry About
Byline: Catharine Skipp A new SAT option is supposed to reduce stress. Fat chance. Oliver Beavers is planning to take the SATs again, and he's a little nervous. "Everyone has good test days and bad test days," he says. So it makes sense that...
Status Update: Broken Heart
Byline: Jessica Bennett How the digital world is changing the rules of campus courtship. Katie Vojtko had been dating her boyfriend for eight months. The two had met at a party at the University of Pittsburgh, where both of them were students....
Students without Borders
Byline: Arlene Getz New options for those who seek a global education. American students abroad are hardly rare: a report by the American Council on Education found that the number of U.S. institutions offering overseas opportunities rose from...
Taking the Longer Road
Byline: Tony Dokoupil More students than ever are interrupting their college educations to earn tuition money. Kyle Maguire wanted to attend the University of Nebraska as soon as he graduated from high school in 2005. An aspiring Web developer,...
The Journey of a Lifetime Begins Now
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz By the time you reach the point of applying to college, you may feel that you've heard way too much advice from your parents, your teachers, your guidance counselors, your neighbors--even that guy who graduated from your...
The New Math of Financial Aid
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores How the economic meltdown has changed the calculus. And what you can do about it. For years, Tom and Lori Lapin dutifully prepared for their two sons' college educations. They made regular contributions to 529 accounts,...
The Perfect Essay
Byline: Mark Starr Eight secrets to crafting a memorable personal statement. It doesn't run much longer than 500 words, shorter than most high-school English assignments. Yet for so many students the essay remains the most daunting part of the...
The Sound of One Hand Clicking
Byline: Karen Breslau; With Samantha Henig Online schools are booming, thanks to their convenience, low cost, and improved quality. Luis Figueroa lives down the street from UC Merced, the newest campus in the University of California system....
The Write Way to Stay Connected
Sharing their hopes and fears helps students learn to cope. When students arrive on campus with their parents, both parties often assume that the school will function in loco parentis, watching over its young charges, providing assistance when needed....
To Pick a College, Look in the Mirror
Byline: Douglas Bennett; Bennett is President and Professor of Politics at Earlham College. Where should you go to college? you have nearly 1,500 colleges and universities to choose among--and that counts just the accredited four-year institutions....
Turning the Page on Tradition
Byline: Arlene Getz Are college yearbooks on the endangered-species list? Somehow, yearbooks have always been more than the sum of their parts. More than mere highlights of the year's events, those permanently smiling portraits always held--for...
Two for the Price of One
Byline: Sharon Begley More programs are offering admission to med school and undergrad at the same time. How one Alabama university sweetens the pot. It's not that Raam Venkatesh didn't have one heck of a fun time filling out applications to...
Two Years Is a Good Start
Byline: Daniel Stone Community colleges have a lot to offer. Don't overlook them. Think of it as an upside of the downturn. The economic tsunami that has shrunk endowments and family college funds alike has also triggered a new and growing appreciation...
When Applying, Think Backward
Byline: Andy Rosen; Rosen is the chairman and CEO of Kaplan Inc. Everyone's college goal is not the same. For some students it's about experiencing college life--football games, intellectual conversations, living on campus, being away from home...