Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 14, April 5

1965 All over Again?
Byline: Jonathan Alter The reach of persistent progressivism. Last week brought a lot of talk about how health-care reform (HCR) was the most sweeping piece of domestic legislation since 1965. That's astonishing when you think about it--nearly...
A Deal with the Devil
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai Gulbuddin Hekmatyar is a vicious, brutal, devious warlord. He Could Also be One of America's Tickets out of Afghanistan. The sprawling shamshatoo camp, just outside Peshawar, has always been the most tightly...
Answers (from Page 27)
ANSWERS (FROM PAGE 27): 1. THE INDIANS' BOB FELLER 2. BOB FELLER 3. THE BRAVES' WARREN SPAHN 4. BABE RUTH, AGE 21, 1916 5. BABE RUTH, 1916 6. PITCHER HOYT WILHELM 7. YANKEES SECOND BASEMAN JOE GORDON 8. TIGERS THIRD BASEMAN GEORGE KELL 9. LONNIE SMITH,...
Boethius Comes to the Beltway
Byline: Jon Meacham Pat Sajak is somewhat better known than Boethius (and Vanna White surely is), but this being Holy Week for Christians, let us take a moment to consider the philosopher who defined the wheel of fortune long before the game show....
China's Mixed Signals
Byline: Melinda Liu It would be understandable if foreign business leaders are confused by the signals Beijing is sending these days. On the one hand, Premier Wen Jiabao cordially greeted international executives last week, telling them, "It's important...
Credit Is Dead. Long Live Cash!
Byline: Daniel Gross Why the return of a cash economy is good for consumers and businesses alike. Cheap and plentiful credit has powered the U.S. economy for decades. But since the financial crisis of 2008, America has gone on a drastic debt...
'Full Steam Ahead at Guantanamo
Byline: Michael Isikoff The Pentagon is poised to rescind last year's order halting military-commission cases, a final legal step as it gears up to try accused terrorists. But there's an awkward hitch: the new trials will be held in the $12 million,...
How I Got off 'Mental Welfare'
Byline: Lucille O'Neal I still remember walking into my house that summer day in 1971 and seeing my mother and grandmother waiting for me in the living room. They were the two most important women in my life, and they'd joined forces to confront...
It's the Economy, Stupid
Byline: Daniel Gross How growth could change the midterms. Many republicans are looking forward to November as a repeat of 1994, when popular anger against an overreaching, reformist Democratic Party enabled the GOP to pick up 56 seats in the...
Lawyers vs. Health Reform
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why the court challenges will fail. Virginia's Attorney General, Ken Cuccinelli II, is a man in a big, big hurry. He had promised to challenge the constitutionality of the newly enacted health-care legislation "as soon...
Learning from LBJ
Byline: Evan Thomas and Katie Connolly Obama is more of a persuader than a fighter--but he's still a work in progress. It's called "the treatment." All presidents administer it, one way or another. The trick is to use the perks of the office...
Musykal Maveryk
Byline: Seth Colter Walls Erykah Badu's latest album is filled with plenty of gonzo touches, not least of which is its title--New Amerykah, Part II: Return of the Ankh. One of the best moments comes toward the end, when Badu's voice is manipulated...
'Socialism,' Chicago Style
Byline: Howard Fineman Why the health industry quietly loves Obamacare. I've been covering Congress forever and had never heard this in the press gallery: shouts of an angry crowd outside the Capitol. Since the health-care vote in the House,...
Steven Chu: 'Swing for the Fences'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria America's green czar is counting on big breakthroughs. On the campaign trail--before the global economic crisis--Barack Obama said the top three things he wanted to accomplish as president were withdrawing troops from Iraq,...
The Bad Shepherd
Byline: Lisa Miller Why Pope Benedict XVI may not be able to heal his church. Two years ago Pope Benedict XVI--once known as "God's Rottweiler"--displayed his gentler side on a pilgrimage to America. Television pundits spoke of his soft white...
The Color of Money
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan When Mark Rothko committed suicide in 1970, he left behind hundreds of unsold paintings. Partly, he didn't want to flood the market, but he also found it hard to part with them. He considered his artworks to be his children,...
The Moral Weight of War
Byline: Julia Baird Marines deserve to know the truth. "We don't have the luxury of choosing our wars. We go where and when our president tells us to--without hesitation. I know it's hard for some to understand: no matter how much it sucks at...
The Wisdom of Woz
Why Apple's cofounder wants two iPads. Steve Wozniak stopped working at Apple in the late 1980s, but he's never stopped being a fan. Daniel Lyons caught up with Woz as he was driving through a snowstorm in Green River, Wyo., on his way to judge...
Think Really Different
Byline: Daniel Lyons The iPad will change the way you use computers, read books, and watch TV--as long as you're willing to do it the Steve Jobs way. What's the big deal about Apple's iPad, currently arriving in stores on the biggest wave of...
Try to Hit These Curves
Byline: George F. Will Explain the putout that was scored 8-8. This column does not grade on the curve but believes that those--you know who you were--who flunked last spring's baseball quiz deserve a do-over. So: 1. Who pitched three no-hitters...
Turning the Page
Byline: Anna Quindlen The future of reading is backlit and bright. The stages of a writer's professional life are marked not by a name on an office door, but by a name in ink. There was the morning when my father came home carrying a stack of...
Welcome to Smallville
Byline: Ezra Klein Don't be Fooled: Congress Still Needs Fixing. In the months leading up to the health-care-reform vote, there was much talk that Congress is broken and serious reform is necessary. Some would say the bill's passage is a decisive...
Who Were the First April Fools?
Byline: Ian Yarett We know that April Fool's Day, a worldwide celebration of pranks and hoaxes, was around before 1539, when the earliest clear reference appears in a Flemish manuscript. Beyond that, we're not really sure. Theories on the origins...