Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 10, March 7

After Gaddafi
Byline: Dirk Vandewalle How does a country recover from 40 years of destruction by an unchallenged tyrant? Libya was on the brink of tectonic change as NEWSWEEK went to press, with the regime of Muammar Gaddafi in a state of dramatic fulmination...
Art from a Time When Seeing Was Believing
Byline: Blake Gopnik For most of us, most of the time, our encounters with works of art come closer to genuflection than contemplation. As we rush by the works in our museums, we're more like Catholics crossing themselves by the altar than art historians...
Best of the Runways
Byline: Robin Givhan As the fashion industry previews its fall 2011 collections, the razzle-dazzle of the frocks, the realities of the bottom line, and the cultural titillation of celebrities are equally on display. In New York, the spotlight centered...
Chicago Steps Out
Byline: Raymond Sokolov The Second City is finally hip. Now Rahm has to keep it rolling. In the final days of the campaign that got him elected mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel crossed paths with Patricia Sandifer on the Blue Line of the city's...
David Brooks Wants to Be Friends
Byline: James Atlas Turning away from Washington's shallowness and the warfare of partisan politics, the New York Times columnist has written a book about the human longing for contact and community. Seated in a booth at equinox, a generically...
Do We Still Need Unions? No
Byline: Mark McKinnon Let's End a Privileged Class. The manufactured Madison, Wis., mob is not the movement the White House was hoping for. Both may find themselves at the wrong end of the populist pitchfork. While I generally defend collective...
Do We Still Need Unions? Yes
Byline: Ezra Klein Why they're Worth Fighting For. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's effort two weeks ago to end collective bargaining for public employees in his state was the worst thing to happen to the union movement in recent memory--until it...
High Speed to Insolvency
Byline: George F. Will Why liberals love trains. Generations hence, when the river of time has worn this presidency's importance to a small, smooth pebble in the stream of history, people will still marvel that its defining trait was a mania...
I Can't Think!
Byline: Sharon Begley The Twitterization of our culture has revolutionized our lives, but with an unintended consequence--our overloaded brains freeze when we have to make decisions. Imagine the most mind-numbing choice you've faced lately, one...
My Soldier Ships Out
Byline: Jessie Knadler The atrocity in Tucson, the protests in North Africa, the economy's continuing saga. It's easy to forget there's--hello!--a war on terror still raging in the foothills of the Himalayas. But not for me. My husband, Jake, a...
New York's Comic-Book Hero
Byline: Malcolm Jones Cartoonist Ben Katchor returns with a new opus. Window-shopping with comics artist Ben Katchor through what he calls the "cheap merchandise district" in midtown Manhattan is a little like tumbling into one of Katchor's strips....
Not Your Grandma's 'Red Riding Hood'
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh How Amanda Seyfried and the director of 'Twilight' vamped up a fusty old fairy tale. On a gloomy and wet California day, director Catherine Hardwicke curls up in her office on the Warner Bros. lot with a book in her hand....
Showdown
Byline: R. M. Schneiderman and Andrew Romano; Newsweek Forget Wisconsin's meltdown. How Ohio's budget ba ttle could decide who wins the White House in 2012. There's a chill in the air as Ohio Gov. John Kasich ambles down the steps of a white...
Tennessee Williams Is Back for His Encore
Byline: Jeremy Mccarter Tennessee Williams is aging beautifully, now that he's gone. When he died in 1983, his career had all but ground to a halt. More than two decades had passed since his last Broadway success. Stars had ceased clamoring for...
The Case for Sitting on Our Hands
Byline: Peter Beinart They're exhilarating, of course. But from an American perspective, the revolutions transforming the Middle East are also deeply sad. They're sad because they underscore what a terrible waste the last decade of American foreign...
Un-American Revolutions
Byline: Niall Ferguson Most rebellions end in carnage and tyranny. So why are Americans cheering on the Arab revolutionary wave? Americans love a revolution. Their own great nation having been founded by a revolutionary declaration and forged...
You Were Expecting Olbermann?
Byline: Howard Kurtz Rachel Maddow seizes her moment as the face of MSNBC at an uncomfortable crossroads. The woman at the whiteboard, in a brown hoodie, white T shirt, and jeans, scribbles away as the debate careens from John Boehner to abortion...