Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 14, October 3

Can Mitt Make the Sale?
Byline: Andrew Romano Perry's stumbling, the economy's crumbling, Obama's in freefall. All this could make it Mitt Romney's moment. But-- What is Mitt Romney? It is very hard to tell. Put him on a debate stage, and he can outshine the klieg lights....
Carlos Slim
Byline: Lloyd Grove The Mexican telecom tycoon, who's the world's richest man, says what's wrong with the economy and why he's bullish on 'The New York Times'. How do we fix this recession? Aside from lowering taxes, we should be directing...
Emotion-Free Investing
Byline: Jean Chatzky As the stock market continues to yo-yo, it can be tough to stay calm. Here's how to keep your feelings out of your finances. We've all been riding an emotional roller coaster lately, watching the markets zoom up and down...
'God, It's Got to Stop'
One man's quest to end gang violence in America. I got the call from Cincinnati in the fall of 2006. The city had rioted after the killing of an unarmed black man named Timothy Thomas. He'd been stopped and arrested for trivial stuff, over and over...
Greece on the Skids
Byline: Christopher Dickey The prime minister must remake his country. Fat chance. The cocktail reception for the prime minister of Greece was to be held in the Rotunda of the Pierre Hotel in New York City, where trompe l'oeil frescoes show New...
I Committed Murder
Byline: Michael Daly For the anonymous executioners of death row, the 'high' of pulling the lever is often followed by a lifetime of doubt. Only a fellow executioner like 59-year-old Jerry Givens would know how crushingly hard it will continue...
In My Nightmares I Can See Their Faces
Byline: Allen Ault; Ault is the dean of the College of Justice & Safety at Eastern Kentucky University. Ordering Death in Georgia I can't always remember their names, but in my nightmares I can see their faces. As the commissioner of the...
'It Just Takes One Madman'
Pedro Almodovar turns the preposterous into the sublime. He says his new thriller, about a surgeon creating his dream woman, isn't farfetched. On a blank little street in Madrid called the Calle Navacerrada, near a park devoted to Eva Peron, stands...
Jonah Hill Throws a Curveball
Byline: Chris Lee The comedian drops his stoner act and embraces his nerdy side in 'Moneyball.' In Moneyball, based on the 2003 nonfiction bestseller book of the same name, Brad Pitt swings for the proverbial fences: his character sets out to...
Let's Make a Deal!
Byline: Eli Lake Obama pressures Israel to make concessions to the Palestinians--while he arms Tel Aviv. Barack Obama has spent his entire time in office urging the Israelis to make wrenching concessions to the Palestinians, and the American...
Love Triangles
Byline: Liesl Schillinger; Schillinger is a New York-based literary critic. Middlesex author Jeffrey Eugenides on his new novel, sexual politics, and the perils of literary fame. In 1982, when he was 21, living in India and volunteering at Mother...
My Favorite Mistake: Muhammad Yunus
Muhammad Yunus on the mistake that cost him his own bank. In 1976 I started Grameen Bank with $27 and a desire to help the poor. Doing this required giving out small, noncollateral loans so poor entrepreneurs could start their own businesses. ...
Our Deceitful 'Friends'
Byline: Zalmay Khalilzad; Khalilzad is a former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Pakistan helps the Taliban. We need to rethink who the enemy is. Ten years since the launch of combat operations in Afghanistan, the United States is at a critical...
Pelosi Punches Back
Byline: Lois Romano The newly reenergized House minority leader could prove crucial to Obama in 2012. It's been a rough year for Nancy Pelosi. The California Democrat had to surrender her speaker's gavel in January after the largest loss of Democratic...
Roger's Reality Show
Byline: Howard Kurtz; Kurtz, Washington bureau chief for Newsweek/The Daily Beast, hosts CNN's Reliable Sources. First, Ailes dialed back the Tea Party talk. Now he's turning the GOP race into a political X-Factor--and steering the election agenda...
The Comedy of Cancer
Byline: Seth Rogen Seth Rogen and his friend Will Reiser turned a real-life diagnosis into the quietly hilarious new film '50/50.' Rogen tells Newsweek how the experience changed him. I first met Will Reiser when my writing partner, Evan Goldberg,...
The Death of the Death Penalty
Byline: Scott Turow The courts and public are moving toward repeal but not fast enough for inmates like Troy Davis. The executions last week of Troy Davis in Georgia and Lawrence Russell Brewer in Texas, as well as the United States Supreme Court's...
The Other Andy
Byline: Blake Gopnik Forget Campbell's Soup and Marilyn-the Warhol that matters is the freak who sold out to TV. Today's artists love him. The most important figure in contemporary art may be a guy named Andy Warhol. Not the Andy Warhol who gave...
Thursday-Night Wrestling
Byline: Bryan Curtis For the first time since he picked clean the assets of a dying company, Mitt Romney is grinning with real passion. The man who brought it out of him is Rick Perry. Their grappling theater is the best thing this side of Monday...
You Were Expecting Statehood?
Byline: Niall Ferguson As the Palestinians learned last week, the U.N. serves the interests of great powers. Just as it was meant to. The Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas's bid for full U.N. membership was dead on arrival in New York. So why...