Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 11, March 15

Blackboard Jungle
Byline: Pat Wingert Freshly minted teachers have passed every test but one: hot to control their classrooms. Back in the '60s, when I attended the Queen of the Rosary school in suburban Chicago, classroom management was not an issue. We had more...
Bring the Olympics Online
Byline: Daniel Lyons I want more events, less Bob Costas. Here's how I want to watch the 2014 Winter Olympics. I want to go to a Web site, choose an event--say, men's downhill skiing--and watch the whole thing from beginning to end, on my big-screen...
Can We Really Forgive and Forget?
Byline: Reported by Matthew Philips Businesses make terrible mistakes. It's how they react that can determine whether they thrive--or even survive. Toyota was slow to acknowledge its problems, but ultimately recalled 8 million vehicles and apologized....
David Paterson's Dilemma
Byline: Ellis Cose Black solidarity no longer trumps all. Gus Savage is not someone who normally springs to my mind. The onetime Chicago congressman lost his seat in 1992 and quickly vanished from the national scene. But as scandal threatens...
'Degenerate' Opera: Hear No Evil
Byline: Seth Colter Walls The story of Franz Schreker flips classical music's greatest cliche on its head. Instead of toiling in obscurity during his life and gaining fame only after death, the Austrian was a star as a young composer--before he...
Democracy Is a Pesky Thing
Byline: Jon Meacham Last Thursday morning in North Carolina, after we had finished a pleasant hour of conversation on the air, Charlotte radio host Mike Collins handed me printouts of a few e-mails from listeners. A good bit of the interview had...
Education Timeline
1820s-30s The first common (public) schools crop up; elementary education won't be mandatory nationwide until 1918. 1840s The demand for teachers rises. As men gravitate toward more prestigious jobs, women fill the gap. 1857 The National...
Forget the Cocaine Vaccine
Byline: Sharon Begley Low-tech treatments work better. Freud was a disaster for psychiatry, but not because his theory of the mind inspired his acolytes to exclude physical and chemical processes from explanations of thoughts, emotion, and behaviors....
F: Why We Can't Get Rid of Failing Teachers
Byline: Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert Why we can't get rid of failing teachers. The relative decline of American education at the elementary- and high-school levels has long been a national embarrassment as well as a threat to the nation's future....
Government by Loophole
Byline: Ezra Klein How a bill shouldn't become a law. Ask a kid who just took civics how a bill becomes a law and she'll explain that Congress takes a vote and if a majority supports the bill, the bill goes to the president. That's what we teach...
Learning to Love Lindsey
Byline: Katie Connolly and Weston Kosova ***** Correction: The original version of this story incorrectly said that the state Republican party censured Sen. Graham twice. In fact, the GOP party in two different counties censured the senator....
Life Isn't Beautiful
Byline: Cynthia Ozick Written in Pencil in the Sealed Railway-Car here in this carload i am eve with abel my son if you see my older son cain son of man tell him that i --Dan Pagis (from the Hebrew) In "Commitment," his 1963...
Liz Cheney's Justice Jihad
Byline: Michael Isikoff In recent days the Justice Department has been getting angry phone calls about the "Qaeda" lawyers supposedly hired by Attorney General Eric Holder. The reason? An unusually ferocious Web ad by Liz Cheney's advocacy group,...
Make It Stop
Byline: Jacob Weisberg How Obama can fix our runaway government. Amid the right's hysterical repudiation of everything President Obama has done or wants to do, one legitimate concern stands out: that Washington will grow without limits. The federal...
Murder in Dubai
Byline: Michael Isikoff Guilty or not, Israel stands to benefit from the assassination of a Hamas operative. The assassins who killed Mahmoud Al-Mabhouh at a five-star Dubai hotel in January made one mistake: their work was too perfect. The hit...
Schoolyard Brawl
Byline: Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert A leading reformer and a union head square off over teacher tenure. Last summer we asked Randi Weingarten, the head of the 1.4 million-member American Federation of Teachers, the second--largest teachers' union...
Terror Has a New Name
Byline: Jeremy Kahn Lashkar-e-Taiba--the Pakistani militant group that perpetrated the 2008 Mumbai attacks--is getting ready to go global. Even as Al Qaeda's core organization has been battered by accurate American drone strikes, U.S. security...
The Other Middle Class
Byline: Rana Foroohar and Mac Margolis The world's burgeoning bourgeoisie may be a market for our goods--but don't expect them to buy into our values. Middle classes have always been the bulwark of society. Aristotle believed they are democracy's...
'The Pacific': Hollywood Goes to War (Again)
Byline: Caryn James Deep into HBO's megabudget miniseries The Pacific, as Americans fight the Japanese in a gruesome battle to control tiny Peleliu island, a sensitive officer comforts a horrified young Marine, assuring him that the brutality is...
The Real Generation Gap
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Young adults are getting slammed. The "generation gap" endures as a staple of American political and social analysis. The notion that the special circumstances and experiences of succeeding cohorts imbue them with...
'There Was Nothing but Silence and Darkness'
Byline: Ben Casnocha At 1:45 a.m. on Feb. 27, I slunk into bed. It was a loud night; my neighbors were hosting a raucous birthday party, which called for several renditions of "Feliz Cumpleanos." Waiting for the festivities to wind down, I began...
This Won't Hurt a Bit
Byline: Sharon Begley How we can save billions by cutting out unnecessary procedures that kill tens of thousands a year. When the white house and congress were struggling last year to keep the cost of health-care reform from exploding, they got...
Valerie Jarret: 'We Inherited a Mess'
Byline: Lally Weymouth The White House senior adviser on the president's first year. One of the first family's closest friends from Chicago, Valerie Jarrett came to Washington largely to keep them grounded. She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth...
When Bishops Play Politics
Byline: Lisa Miller A new generation gets righteous. They see themselves as crusaders for human rights--protectors of the innocent, the voiceless, and the powerless. After years of enduring the slings and arrows of opposition, these activists...
Why Germany Can't Go It Alone
Byline: Stefan Theil The crisis now engulfing Southern Europe's heavily indebted governments has exposed deep rifts within the European Union. Last week worries about Greece's solvency threatened to infect Spain, a much bigger economy caught in...