Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 22, May 31

A Coalition of the Willing in Great Britain
Byline: William Underhill Now that the question of who will lead the country is settled, politicians can get down to answering the more important query: can a coalition government work in Britain? There hasn't been one since World War II, and Britons...
Apple's Bite
Byline: Jacob Weisberg Publishers should beware the iPad. During the pre-Internet era, the Italian philosopher Umberto Eco explained the difference between Apple and Microsoft in terms of the divide between Catholics and Protestants. In the DOS-based...
Beer Baron
Byline: Josh Hyatt How the founder of Sam Adams bottled lightning. Jim Koch loves to talk about little companies that take on the Big Guys: artisanal-cheese makers who battle importers, the microdistillers who taunt liquor giants--and, most of...
Can We Talk?
Byline: Caryn James We know Joan Rivers can be tacky, abrasive, self-mocking. On her way to winning Celebrity Apprentice last year, she berated professional gambler Annie Duke, screaming "You're a pokah playah--that's beyond white trash!" Her scary-surgery...
Desperately Seeking Cures
Byline: Sharon Begley and Mary Carmichael How the road from promising scientific breakthrough to real-world remedy has become all but a dead end. From 1996 to 1999, the U.S. food and Drug Administration approved 157 new drugs. In the comparable...
Elena Kagan Must Talk
Byline: Ezra Klein With great supremacy comes great responsibility. Ever wonder why most of your credit card mail comes from South Dakota? The answer is a 1978 Supreme Court decision called Marquette National Bank of Minneapolis v. First of Omaha...
Euro Trashed
The Greek debt crisis could be the beginning of the end of Europe's answer to the dollar. Crisis--from the Greek "krisis"--is one of many English words we owe to the ancient Athenians. Now their modern descendants are reminding us what it really...
Green Giants
Byline: Matthew Philips Next-generation skyscrapers will not only save energy--they'llgenerate their own. For the last half century, most Americans have driven to work by themselves. Chances are your commute takes longer than your parents' did,...
Heroes for a Day
Byline: Brad Meltzer I was sitting at home one day in 2004 when the phone rang. "Department of Homeland Security," said the voice on the other end of the line. "We have a question for you." If this sounds like the setup to a thriller, trust me,...
Save Yourself
Byline: Jonathan Finkelstein Health-care reform is only half the battle. We've recently heard a lot about improving our health-care system, but less about improving our health--as individuals and as a nation. Although we pay the most for our...
She's No Bridget Jones
Byline: Julia Baird Kagan's sexuality? Case closed. You know things are getting a little grim when Eliot Spitzer has to vouch for your heterosex-uality. "I did not go out with [Elena Kagan], but other guys did," he told Politico. "I don't think...
The Clash of the Yogis
Byline: Lisa Miller Do the Hindu roots of yoga matter? I don't care much for bland spirituality, so at yoga class I generally tune out the prelude, when the teacher reads aloud--as is the custom--an inspirational passage on which to meditate....
The High Price of Facebook
Byline: Daniel Lyons You pay for it with your privacy. If you don't spend your days glued to tech blogs, you might not know about the latest trend among hipster techies: quitting Facebook. These folks, including a bunch of Google engineers, are...
The Kingmaker
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh When it comes to electing Iraq's next prime minister, Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's vote may be the only one that counts. The men in black are back. They reappeared on Baghdad's streets about a month ago, the day after...
The Mouth That Roared
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau The failed May 1 Times Square car bombing is rattling the Waziristan tribal badlands of Pakistan. Tribal chieftains and militant leaders are furious with Pakistani Taliban commander Hakimullah Mehsud and his...
The Secrets of Stieg Larsson
Byline: Malcolm Jones Stieg Larsson was not perfect. His crime thrillers are packed with enough coincidences to make Dickens blush. His fight sequences read as though they've been transcribed from a videogame. He name-checks products, particularly...
Twilight of the WASPs
Byline: Evan Thomas With the retirement of Justice John Paul Stevens, the white Anglo-Saxon Protestant no longer reigns supreme. Old tigers should be celebrating the nomination of Elena Kagan, Princeton class of '81, to the United States Supreme...
Wake Up, America
Why we must balance the budget. You might think that Europe's economic turmoil would inject a note of urgency into America's budget debate. After all, high government deficits and debt are the root sources of Europe's problems, and these same problems...
What Happened to Obama's Armageddon?
Byline: Jon Meacham Here is a wild proposition, one that many who obsessively follow politics did not expect to entertain before Mem-orial Day. What if Barack Obama is not a tone-deaf big spender who misread the public on large-scale government...