Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 01, January 3

A Bright Day for Energy
Byline: Sharon Begley Even before their midterm debacle, Democrats couldn't pass an energy-climate bill worth the name. Prospects for legislation to free the country from dependence on petro-dictators--and put it on a path to a renewable energy-based...
Afghanistan Feels the Squeeze
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai If Gen. David Petraeus gets his wish, this will be the year of the snake. America's top officer in Afghanistan recently explained his war plan as the "anaconda strategy," designed to "squeeze the life" out of...
Alan Simpson
Byline: Eleanor Clift As co-leader of the deficit commission, he aimed to slay the national debt. He failed--not for want of trying. First of all, I want to know your reaction to the tax deal that's before the Congress. It doesn't have too many...
A Military About-Face
Byline: John Barry Deficit cutters almost all agree that Pentagon spending will have to take a serious hit in 2011--and for the foreseeable future. The cost of defending the U.S. has doubled since 9/11, to nearly $700 billion in the current fiscal...
Aung San Suu Kyi
Byline: Danielle Bernstein After years of detention by Burma's junta, the nobelist speaks of sanctions, karma, and the future. You spent much of your time under house arrest listening to the radio. What do you like to listen to? Listening...
Avigdor Liberman
Byline: Dan Ephron Israel's most popular politician right now is a burly cigar smoker who wants to redraw its borders to exclude most Arabs. What is the far-right foreign minister thinking? You're not a big believer in "territory for peace."...
Bill Gates and Randi Weingarten
Byline: Daniel Lyons Can the billionaire philanthropist and the president of the American federation of teachers find common ground--and fix our nation's education system? Our schools are lagging behind the rest of the world. Why is that? How...
Catherine Ashton
Byline: John Barry Europe's first foreign minister on Middle East peace, the rise of China, getting around without a plane, and the job she really wanted. Initial reactions [to your getting the job] were pretty dismissive, weren't they? Most...
Conventional Wisdom 2010
With the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, an earthquake in Haiti, rank partisanship in Washington, and rotten eggs at home, the CW can be excused for considering 2010 a year to forget. P.S. Don't touch our junk! Obama (sideways) Got health care, fin...
Cory Booker
Byline: Andrew Romano Newark's Mayor has long been considered one of the most promising politicians of his generation. Now, with a $100 million education grant from Facebook, he's hoping to become one of the most influential. One of your goals...
Dan Savage and Jane Lynch
Byline: Jessica Bennett He created the 'It Gets Better' video campaign. She stars in 'glee,' the gayest show in the history of network TV. So we thought: who better to ask about the gay lay of the land? It's been a big year in gay rights: marriage,...
David Axelrod
Byline: Eleanor Clift and Daniel Stone Obama's top strategist is moving back to Chicago to prepare for 2012. He talks about mistakes made, the GOP presidential field, and why 'hope' and 'change' are still good themes. You're the message man....
Dr. Francis Collins
Byline: Sharon Begley, Debra Rosenberg, and Ian Yarett The director of the NIH on the promise of the human genome and what happens when you mix faith and science. Do you have any concerns that NIH's $30 billion budget is vulnerable? I think...
Elizabeth Warren
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson and Jeffrey Bartholet Obama tapped her to set up the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Can she create a more honest market? When do you aim to open the new agency? The official transfer date is July 21,...
Feisal Abdul Rauf
Byline: Lisa Miller The imam behind the so-called Ground Zero mosque reflects on the 'insanity' of religious radicals. How have the events of the summer changed you? We learned a number of lessons, the most important of which is this: the...
Howard Schmidt
Byline: Josephine Wolff Hackers and spies have launched attacks on vital computer systems in recent months. White House cyber-security coordinator Howard Schmidt on what it all means. When you see what makes it onto the evening news, would you...
Joel and Ethan Coen
Byline: David Ansen 'Raising Arizona,' 'Fargo,' and 'No Country for Old Men' defy categorization--except as Coen brothers movies. So what happens when the quirky duo from Minnesota decide to remake a John Wayne Western? True Grit is the first...
Kicking Back on Taxes
Byline: Andrew Romano In 2008 Barack Obama promised that he would end George W. Bush's soon-to-expire tax cuts for taxpayers who make more than $250,000 a year. His rationale: we can no longer afford expensive cuts that haven't created jobs or grown...
Marissa Mayer
Byline: Daniel Lyons Who says you have to be a guy to be a geek? This Google senior executive is teaching a new generation that femininity and technology are a winning formula. Why are so few women working in the technology industry? Well,...
No Panic Attacks in America
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Bob Woodward exposed reams of classified intelligence in his most recent book. But it was Barack Obama's assertion of the obvious that ignited outrage among his national-security critics. The president told Woodward that...
Obituaries: -2010
Lena Horne, 92 She stood apart from the very beginning, and not always in a good way. Although she appeared in several MGM musicals in the '40s, Horne often performed alone, so that her scenes could be easily removed if bigoted audiences objected...
Perspectives
Jan. 25* 'Bodies. Bodies. Bodies. Bodies. Bodies. Bodies. I don't know how else to say it.' Haitian-American musician Richard Morse, in a tweet from Port-au-Prince, where he was working on an album when the earthquake hit. March 22 'Not only did...
Richard Branson
Byline: Sharon Begley His empire includes airlines, mobile phones, digital publishing, and space travel. Why the billionaire high-school dropout has added climate change to his agenda. You have said that on global climate change, governments...
Salam Fayyad
Byline: Tom Segev Palestine's Prime Minister is trying to build a state, much as David Ben-Gurion did in 1948. The leading Israeli historian of that period looks at how he's doing. You're still working on your plan [to build an independent Palestinian...
Sandra Day O'Connor Interviews John Paul Stevens
They've left the bench, but they still have opinions. Two former justices talk about how they've evolved--and how they feel about being overruled by a changing court. O'Connor: Do you think that over the years you were here, your approach to cases...
Sarah Shourd
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh She spent 410 days in an Iranian prison for crossing an unmarked border, and she's not free yet. I talked to your mom while you were in prison. Is it true the other prisoners serenaded you with Celine Dion? Yeah. Actually,...
The Regime's New Dread in Iran
Byline: Maziar Bahari Roozbeh, a 26-year-old university student in Tehran, considers himself a revolutionary. Never mind that he rarely leaves his room at his mother's house. "Many people of my generation hate this regime," he tells NEWSWEEK via...
Will.I.Am
Byline: Lorraine Ali The 35-year-old formerly known as William James Adams Jr. is now more ubiquitous than UGG boots and Red Bull combined. His next stop: the Super Bowl. You've played the World Cup and the presidential inauguration. How does...