Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 18, May 2

Bride vs. Bride
How does Kate Middleton's wedding stack up against the past 'weddings of the century'? Our guide to the most regal pairings in recent history. Kate Middleton Date: April 29, 2011 Nickname: Waity Katie Groom: Prince William Dress: The...
Buffett on the Spot
Byline: Roger Lowenstein What were you thinking, Warren? At his shareholders' meeting, the oracle will have to answer for his biggest management bungle. America has a way of elevating its heroes beyond the realm of mere mortals. This has not...
Copper Is King
Byline: Niall Ferguson Gold prices are up, but another metal connects the world--and reveals our economic future. Copperfinger doesn't have the same ring as Goldfinger. Nor would you be very impressed by a man with a copper gun. Copper isn't...
'Fat Redneck' for President
Byline: Lloyd Grove Iowa likes Haley Barbour, who's set to announce his 2012 plans. In the huge GOP field, don't bet against him. Haley Barbour lugs more than his share of baggage into the Republican presidential arena. In an age that favors...
Hollywood Confronts the Last Taboo
Byline: Chris Lee Why are so many actors dropping their pants? A film's success rises or falls on the smallest of details. And so it was that the director of this month's medieval stoner comedy Your Highness found himself in a boardroom with...
Interview: Elon Musk
Byline: Marlow Stern The electric-car pioneer and space prophet talks about his Hollywood reputation and why so many billionaires have intergalactic fantasies. The new film Revenge of the Electric Car depicts the race between your company Tesla...
Katie Couric Seeks Advice
Byline: Howard Kurtz On her way out, the CBS anchor starts to open up about her life's ups and downs. Katie Couric kept having a dark fantasy that one of the New York City buses with her face splashed along the side would run her over, completing...
Look, Ma, We're Fashion Moguls!
Byline: Robin Givhan With their high-end label The Row, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen have such a grown-up hit on their hands that even Michelle Obama wears their clothes. Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, whom most people know as the diminutive former...
My Favorite Mistake
Byline: Paul Allen Paul Allen on how he and Bill Gates went bust before they went big. In the summer of 1972, when I was home in Seattle from college and Bill Gates was heading into his senior year at Lakeside School, we were casting for our...
Shattered Faith
Byline: Hampton Sides What the fall of Greg Mortenson tells us about America's irrepressible longing for heroes. I remember my first Mortenson Moment. It was a few years ago, in an old auditorium in Santa Fe, N.M., and I sat waiting with my wife...
Surfing for Sex
Byline: Jessica Bennett The largest sex study in history asks: what do a billion Web searches reveal about desire? The first experiment in the most intensive study on sex since the days of Alfred Kinsey took place in the summer of 2009 over a...
The Fighting Dutchmen
Byline: Blake Gopnik Forget Vermeer: For Centuries Metsu was the star. Can he shine again? The Dutch painter Gabriel Metsu has got it rough. Any show by Vermeer, his close colleague, is a blockbuster. The first Metsu survey in five decades just...
The Last Witnesses
Byline: Joshua Hammer War photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were killed in Libya last week, telling a story no one wants to hear. We depend on them for truth, for glimpses into human vileness, even as we cut their jobs and cut...
The Price of a Photo
Byline: Tina Brown Two journalists who gave their lives for the truth, and a war correspondent who walked away. The deaths of THE brave and brilliant photojournalists Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington ripped the hearts of all those who care...
The Trump Backlash
Byline: Howard Kurtz The Donald's free ride is over. As the 2012 race begins, time for more reality, less reality TV. As Donald Trump tries to leverage his brand with a reality-show campaign for president, surging to the top of the 2012 GOP polls,...
The Wrath of Abbas
Byline: Dan Ephron Fed up with the stalled peace talks, the Palestinian leader defies Israel and vents about Obama. We're somewhere over the Mediterranean, and Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, is trying to get inside the head of Barack...
Time for a Royal Wedding.While England Is Royally Screwed
Byline: Ian Jack A tale of two Britains. Nearly a third of the world's population will watch Prince William marry Kate Middleton in Westminster -Abbey on April 29, or so reports in the British press predicting a television audience of more than...
To Walk with Ghosts
Byline: Michael Ware A former CNN correspondent recalls the pain of war and the 'lost love' who saved him. The news bludgeoned me on a sunny Australian morning. Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros had been killed on a rebel front, in a besieged...
Who's Your Diva?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Just as J. Lo rises, here comes Christina to steal the spotlight. Her movie career was basically over. Her music made tweens yawn. She was so jinxed, she even fell onstage in front of millions. Then she signed a deal to...