Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 24, June 14

Banned by the Pope
Byline: Charles E. Curran I knew that the letter--approved by Pope John Paul II and issued by then-cardinal Joseph Ratzinger--was unlikely to be good news. It was 1986, and for the previous seven years, Ratzinger's Congregation for the Doctrine...
Communication Gulf
Byline: Jonathan Alter The president, consumed with cleaning up after his predecessors, can't just strip emotion from the public parts of his job. The BP oil spill is the perfect metaphor for Barack Obama's presidency so far. His first 500 days...
Don't Ask. Tell
Byline: Charles McLean and P. W. Singer Why the military should soldier on with repealing 'don't ask, don't tell.' Every gay-pride parade seems to have its share of sailor suits, aviator sunglasses, and camouflage trousers. In the U.S., such...
Engineering Inspiration
Byline: Josh Hyatt Ideo's David Kelley wants to redesign the way you think. There was a time when it looked as though David Kelley's design career would be summed up in two words: LAVATORY OCCUPIED. Kelley, then a fresh grad from Carnegie...
Executives Wanted
Byline: Mac Margolis Despite record unemployment, recruiters are desperate for top-tier talent. If there is a silver lining hidden in the Great Recession, it ought to be found in corporate headhunting. While the recession has devastated industries...
Fallen Star
Byline: Ellis Cose Artur Davis was on track to be Alabama's first African-American governor--till he took black voters for granted. Artur Davis was supposed to be the Deep South's first elected black governor. He had arrived at Harvard Law School...
Gelato for the Soul
Byline: Sarah Ball There is a fantasy, spawned by W. Shakespeare, propagated by H. James, embraced by A. Hepburn and the Twins Olsen, that today goes something like this: a sad modern lady, one intimately familiar with the Lean Cuisine family of...
Going to Extremes
Byline: Daniel Gross Our unbridled pursuit of untapped energy is taking us into treacherous new territory. The ongoing debacle in the Gulf of Mexico is a sign of many things--the incompetence of BP, poor oversight, and an industry that places...
Iran's Television Drama
Byline: Christopher Dickey A battle for the future of Iran is shaping up in outer space, and it's not about missiles or nuclear weapons. It's about information--the ability to jam the signal that brings the news to the Iranian people via satellite...
'Know What You Don't Know'
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of Cisco Systems on the future of leadership. Cisco Systems Inc. was once best known as the plumber of the Internet, for building the infrastructure and networking equipment that allows worldwide information sharing....
Lost Tribe
Byline: Ehud Eiran Are Israel's battles costing the country its soul? I am in love with Israel. yet the events off the shores of Gaza last week, in which Israeli commandos stormed a blockade-busting aid ship and killed nine activists, were a...
Our Beauty Bias Is Unfair
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick But should it also be illegal? if you are anything like me, you left the theater after Sex and the City 2 and thought, there ought to be a law against a looks-based culture in which the only way for 40-year-old actresses...
Out of Breath
Byline: Seth Colter Walls Every cinephile knows to at least pretend to like Breathless. Jean-Luc Godard's first feature--a witty mashup of American noir and French chic--is as much an art-house staple today as it was in 1960, which is precisely...
Paradise Lost in Thailand
Byline: Joshua Kurlantzick Thailand used to be synonymous with swift growth, stable democracy, and pristine beaches. But that picture has changed. Over the past two months, clashes in Bangkok have killed at least 80 people, gutted the stock exchange...
Reforming the 'Glorious Privilege'
Byline: George F. Will Why the tax code is like daytime television. Woodrow Wilson, that incessant moralizer, said paying taxes is a "glorious privilege." Few Americans have ever relished the glory, so until the 20th century the federal government...
Showdown in Arizona
Byline: Howard Fineman Obama must pursue immigration reform. if there's one number that should matter most to politicians right now--in Washington, in Arizona--it's 83. Thatis the percentage of young Hispanic voters who, according to a new Democracia...
The Beijing Blues
Byline: Fareed Zakaria A rising power is plagued by doubts. Over the last few months, foreign diplomats have privately groused to me about a world power's arrogant foreign policy. Except that they're talking about China, not the United States....
The Front Line Is Online
Byline: Julia Baird Freedom should trump privacy. It's been a year since Neda Agha Soltan died. Since her dark eyes blazed into the camera of an on-looker while she lay on the ground, muttering, "I'm burning, I'm burning." The powerful, gruesome...
The Last Ayatollah
Byline: Maziar Bahari The Green Movement's bloody street protests may not have toppled Iran's Ayatollah Ali Khamenei--but they will. "This is the beginning of the end of the Islamic Republic as we know it," I told my editors at NEWSWEEK in a...
The Recovery Is Real
Byline: Daniel Gross Why fears of a second recession are overblown. In the past month, several unfortunate phrases have joined the lexicon, including "top kill," "Gore divorce," and "double-dip recession." On the Today show on May 21, CNBC's...
What an Umpire Could Teach BP
Byline: Jon Meacham Baseball, the late Bart Giamatti once said, is a tragic undertaking. "It is designed to break your heart," Giamatti, Yale president and baseball commissioner, wrote in an essay titled "The Green Fields of the Mind." "The game...
Whatever Happened to Death and Taxes?
Byline: Number 17, NYC and Nick Summers I, John Q. Public, being of sound mind and body, do hereby make, publish, and declare the following facts about the 2010 estate-tax mess--a fiasco nine years in the making, irrelevant to all but a few, and...
What the Spill Will Kill
Byline: Sharon Begley Giant plumes of crude oil mixed with methane are sweeping the ocean depths with devastating consequences. 'I'm not too worried about oil on the surface,' says one scientist. 'It's the things we don't see that worry me the most.'...