Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 22, November 29

A Drug Bust in China
Byline: Isaac Stone Fish China has a big pharmaceutical problem. A recent UNESCO report said that deep-pocketed China will soon rival the U.S., Europe, and Japan in scientific research and development spending. But the news came with a telling caveat:...
Click and Save
Byline: Daniel Lyons Coupons?! Who'd have thought? In just two years Groupon has become one of the fastest-growing companies on the Web. And the amazing thing is that it all kind of happened by accident. Andrew Mason, the 30-year-old guy who...
Could This Kill Cancer?
Byline: Michael Behar Why scientists are heading underwater to search for a new generation of cures. When Hendrik Luesch invited me to Florida to go snorkeling, I didn't expect to be wading through brackish muck in the Indian River Lagoon, a...
Diagnose Yourself
Byline: Johannah Cornblatt It sounded like a bad joke. One headline read: THINK YOU HAVE AN STD? PEE ON YOUR PHONE TO FIND OUT. But earlier this month researchers in the U.K. received a $6.4 million grant to develop a test for sexually transmitted...
Divided We Eat
Byline: Lisa Miller As more of us indulge our passion for local, organic delicacies, a growing number of Americans don't have enough nutritious food to eat. How we can bridge the gap. For breakfast, I usually have a cappuccino--espresso made...
From the Mixed-Up Files of David Foster Wallace
Byline: Seth Colter Walls Exclusive: NEWSWEEK takes a tour through the late writer's just-released archives. It was an infinitely fascinating quest. On Feb. 7, 1972, when David Foster Wallace was 9 years old, he began work on a creative-writing...
Getting to Bout
Byline: John Barry When celebrated Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout landed last Tuesday night at Stewart International Airport in upstate New York--before being whisked to Manhattan to appear the next day in front of a -district-court judge--it marked...
How I've Redefined Victory
Byline: Tiger Woods Last November, everything I thought I knew about myself changed abruptly, and what others perceived about me shifted, too. I had been conducting my personal life in an artificial way--as if detached from the values my upbringing...
'On to 2007!'
Byline: George F. Will An appointed senator looks back, and ahead. Come January, the faces of 34 U.S. senators will be --wreathed with "six-year smiles"--the carefree look of those whose next election is agreeably distant. Sen. George LeMieux,...
Onward, Jewish Soldiers
Byline: Dan Ephron A surge of 'knitted skullcaps' is transforming Israel's military--and that worries their secular countrymen. Among the elite troops of the Israeli military's Maglan special-forces unit, Naftali Bennett was an oddity. As an...
Pennies from Heaven
Byline: Doree Shafrir With cash for tech startups in shorter supply, angel investors are going where VCs fear to tread. Chris Dixon is sitting in his lofty office in New York's Silicon Alley, trying to persuade an 18-year-old to take his money....
The Comeback of 'The Comeback'
Byline: Joshua Alston There's no more hollow an artistic victory than to be considered ahead of one's time. It's poetic and it dulls the pain of failure a little, but it's the Siberian gale of cold comfort. Yet as cable networks buy up "brilliant...
The Global Blame Game
Byline: Rana Foroohar There's plenty to go around. There have been countless market jitters and rebounds since the fall of Lehman Brothers, but last week's were notable. After seven days of slow drops, the Dow Jones industrial average plunged...
The Next Fight
Byline: Zev Chafets A conservative Democrat reassesses the political battlefield. On Veterans Day a crowd of 300 or so Virginians gathered in a tent on the grounds of the estate of Gen. George C. Marshall. They were there to commemorate what...
There Will Be Exports
Byline: Daniel Gross America isn't just an energy eater. The United States is known throughout the world as a pathetic energy hog. Americans' insatiable need for gas and electricity plays havoc with trade flows (petroleum-related imports accounted...
True to His Word
Byline: James T. Kloppenberg Note to critics: Read (or reread) his books. Obama is doing just what he said he would do. Every old-fashioned American amusement park had a fun house with mirrors that exaggerated your features. One mirror lengthened...
When Was the Least-Lame Lame Duck?
Byline: Daniel Stone and Michael Picon These post-election periods are traditionally most controversial in times like this, when a party is on deadline to cede the majority (in one, if not both, chambers). And with everything on Congress's docket...
Who Wants to See Anne Hathaway's Breasts?
Byline: Jennie Yabroff A young woman asks her doctor to look at a mysterious bump on her breast. She unbuttons her shirt, opens her bra, and the doctor diagnoses the bump as a bug bite. The woman laughs off her overreaction--no one saw but the doctor...