Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 26, June 27

Alexandra Pelosi
Byline: Interview by Rebecca Dana The documentarian, and daughter of Nancy, talks about lazy Americans, philandering politicians, and why her mother will never sext. For your new film, Citizen U.S.A., you interviewed immigrants around the country....
Bon Voyage, Billionaires!
Every summer, the world's mega-rich take to the high seas aboard floating palaces. From a Russian oligarch to a computer geek, who's got the biggest boat? Eclipse 557 feet Russia Owner Oil tycoon Roman Abramovich, who also purchased an entire...
Dressed for Distress
Byline: Robin Givhan Like other women before her, huma abedin is quiet about her husband's scandals--but says much with her wardrobe. As the tawdry Twitter saga of Anthony Weiner rolls past pathology to resignation, the prying public--goaded...
It's a Hot Time to Be a Pawn Star
Byline: Gary Rivlin Hocking your diamond ring used to be shameful business. Now everyone's doing it. To gauge the state of our economy, you could talk to the economists and other so-called experts. Or you could attend the annual pawnbrokers'...
It's Still the Economy, Stupid
Byline: Bill Clinton Fourteen million Americans remain out of work, a waste of our greatest resource. The 42nd president has more than a dozen ideas on how to attack the jobs crisis. 14 WAYS TO PUT AMERICA BACK TO WORK Next week in Chicago,...
Mommy Am I Really Bipolar?
Hundreds of thousands of children in the U.S. have been wrongly diagnosed with the trendy disorder, argues a noted psychiatrist. And the results can be tragic. In the autumn of 1994, a novel idea was afoot in my profession. At the annual conference...
My Favorite Mistake: Jimmie Johnson
Byline: Interview by Ramin Setoodeh Jimmie Johnson on the death-defying crash that saved his career. It was November 1994, and I was driving in a race called the Baja 1,000. It started in Tijuana and ran all the way down the Baja peninsula to...
Republicans Box Themselves In
Byline: Paul Begala The GOP is ignoring a critical message from its base--and that will be the party's undoing. As the spouse of the vice president of our local middle school's PTA, I know President Kennedy was right when he said, "To govern...
Something Different This Way Comes
Byline: Kathleen Parker Will Republicans elect Jon Huntsman if he won't obey their rules? When you spot Fred Davis in the room, you know a Republican is about to get a makeover. Or, in the case of Jon Huntsman, a professed motocross fanatic,...
The Best High Schools in America
Byline: Clark Merrefield, Lauren Streib, And Ian Yarett NEWSWEEK studied more than 1,000 top schools to determine the best of the best: the ones producing kids ready for college--and life. On any given morning, the halls of the School of Science...
The Defense Rests
Byline: John Barry and Tara McKelvey As Robert Gates retires from the Pentagon top job, he sounds a grim warning: America is losing its grip. Aboard the Pentagon jet on his last foreign trip as secretary of defense, Robert Gates takes a moment...
The Galliano Dossier
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Tracy McNicoll; With Jacob Bernstein and Tom Sykes Fashion's enfant terrible is about to have his day in court on charges that he hurled anti-Semitic insults in a Paris cafe. What made him snap? As John Galliano...
The Mideast's Next Dilemma
Byline: Niall Ferguson With Turkey flexing its muscles, we may soon face a revived Ottoman Empire. On one issue the Republican contenders and the president they wish to replace are in agreement: the United States should reduce its military presence...
The Newsweek Top 100
For an expanded ranking of the top 500 schools, including full data for each, go to Newsweek.com. School of Science and Engineering Magnet, Dallas, Texas GRAD. RATE% 100 AVG. SAT 1786 School for the Talented and Gifted Magnet, Dallas, Texas...
The Triple Agent
When the CIA thought it had a line on Ayman al-Zawahiri--al Qaeda's new chief--almost any risk seemed worth it. But in the world of terrorism, no one's loyalty is ever certain. On Dec. 30, 2009, seven CIA operatives were killed at a U.S. base in...
The Web's Secret Cash
Byline: Dan Lyons A novel version of money is sprouting online, letting people shop in complete anonymity. What if people could use the Internet to create a new kind of money, one that didn't involve governments and central banks and could be...
True Blood's Identity Crisis
Byline: Jace Lacob As the hit drama rises again, its creator balances a love story with the supernatural. The 13 million fans obsessed with True Blood can finally breathe a sigh of relief. The existential soap opera, which takes place in the...