Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 19

Anna Nicole's Tabloid Odyssey; She Was a Small-Town Girl, a Playboy Pinup, a Gold Digger and a Reality TV Star. She Lived Her Dream, Then Died in a Lonely Hotel Room. the Rapid Rise and Tawdry Fall of an American Oddity
Byline: Evan Thomas (With Catharine Skipp and Carmen Gentile in Florida) Anna Nicole Smith, born Vickie Lynn Hogan, said she wanted to be Marilyn Monroe. She became instead a kind of bombshell circus freak, a star in the lewd carnival of American...
A 'Straight Shooter' or a Temperament Problem?
Byline: Jonathan Alter Until recently, discussion about which GOP candidate might be temperamentally unsuited for the presidency has revolved around Sen. John McCain, who has a short fuse. But with former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani now poised...
BeliefWatch: Interfaith
Byline: Lisa Miller Christian pastors do it with Muslim imams. High-school seniors do it with each other. Actors and authors do it, as do comedians and combat pilots. It's interfaith dialogue, and in the world of religion, it's very much in vogue....
Can a $100 Laptop Change the World? Nicholas Negroponte Thinks So. He Wants Kids All over the World to Use His Computer to Jump-Start Learning
Byline: Steven Levy The green and white gizmo is not much bigger than a clutch purse, but when you extend its plastic bunny-ear antennas and flip it open, clamshell style, the screen is colorful and welcoming, ready to network or create. It's even...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn You've probably read that investors usually don't do as well as the mutual funds they buy. The reason is simple. You buy, or add to, successful funds after they've started zooming in value, not before. You sell during mediocre...
Corporate Confidant; beneath the Radar for Years, Ram Charan Is Now Flying High as a Consultant. Why Do CEOs Love Him?
Byline: Daniel Mcginn When Jack Welch ran General Electric, every so often he'd schedule an appointment with a man named Ram Charan. They'd sit in Welch's corner suite and spend a couple of agenda-less hours talking about business, people and the...
Dear Junk Mailers: Leave My Son Alone; Thirteen Years after His Death, Advertisers Still Target Jake with Offers of Tuxedos and Snack Cakes
Byline: Gary Wiener (Wiener lives in Pittsford, N.Y.) When his 18th birthday arrived, my son, Jacob, became awfully popular. The U.S. Navy wanted him. "Before you find your place in the world, maybe you should see it first," it urged. A local menswear...
Death Is Inevitable. Taxes? Maybe Not
Byline: Allan Sloan It's hard to turn on a TV this time of year without seeing an ad showing smiling people who've supposedly just learned they'll be getting income-tax refunds thanks to a tax service or software program. Of course, your refund...
Do's and Don'ts If You're after That Oscar; You Thought the Academy Rewards Only Talent? Right. the PR Campaign Is as Important as the Movie Itself
Byline: Sean Smith Of course the Oscars are about celebrating the best film work of the year, but it's not all Armani and air kisses. The race for the gold is a lot like the race for the White House: winning requires strategy, stamina and a sixth...
Fourth-Grade Slump; in the Pressure-Cooker World of the Nation's Elementary Schools, It's Hard to Be 9 Years Old
Byline: Peg Tyre and Karen Springen Terri Bollinger, principal at the Ridge Central elementary school, has noticed a troubling trend. Her third graders are doing incredibly well. Most of them meet or exceed Illinois state reading standards. But...
Global Warming: Get Used to It; Even If We Adopted the Most Far-Reaching Plans to Combat Climate Change, We Would Still Watch Greenhouse Gases Rise for Decades
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com) The most inconvenient truth about global warming is that we cannot stop it. Please don't mistake me for a skeptic. I'm fully persuaded by the evidence that climate change is...
Good Spy vs. Bad Spy; 'Breach' Is a Taut Thriller about the Hanssen Case
Byline: David Ansen Things are not always as they seem. That was certainly the case with Robert Hanssen, the devout, graceless, buttoned-down FBI agent who, after 22 years of deception, was revealed to be one of the most treacherous spies working...
Health: Battle of the Binge
Byline: Karen Springen Ron Saxen's problem with binge eating started when he was 11. He hid the disorder well enough--through exercise and yo-yo dieting--to sign a modeling contract at the age of 21, when he was 6 feet 1 and weighed 179 pounds....
How I Became a Big Wheel; Let Go by IBM and Deeply in Debt, a Family Man Turned His Childhood Passion for Unicycles into a Thriving Online Start-Up. Then He Added a Banjo Business
Byline: John Drummond (Drummond lives in Marietta, Ga.) It was supposed to be a hobby--just a part-time thing to generate a little extra money. We didn't think we could make a living at it. I thought I would work at IBM for 30 years and retire,...
I'm Real. Really. Is It an Accident That Genuine John Edwards Has Chosen This Moment to Emerge?
Byline: Jonathan Darman (With Holly Bailey, Eleanor Clift and Arian Campo-Flores) In the fall of 2005, John Edwards sat down with a pad and pen and scrawled out three simple words: "I was wrong." It was nearly three years after he'd joined a Senate...
Intimate Strangers; America's Long Dance with the Mideast Dates All the Way Back to the Founding Fathers. Who Knew?
Byline: Christopher Dickey The statue of liberty, in her curious way, helps tell the tale of America's long, complicated experiences and profoundly contradictory ambitions in the Middle East. The French sculptor Frederic Bartholdi wanted to build...
Leadership Q&A: Vernon Jordan
Byline: Lazard Freres During more than 40 years in public life, Vernon Jordan has headed the United Negro College Fund, led the Urban League, been a confidant to U.S. presidents, served on various corporate boards--and most recently, advised President...
Newsmakers Q&A: NICOLAS CAGE
Byline: Nicki Gostin In "Ghost Rider," Nicolas Cage plays a motorcycle stuntman who gives his soul to the Devil. But first, he lent his ears to Nicki Gostin. "Ghost Rider" is based on a comic book. Are you a comics fan? I grew up reading them....
Now, Watch Very Carefully
Byline: Sean Smith Even obsessive "Harry Potter" fans don't seem to have noticed that Hogwarts has had a makeover from the first two films. "As you approach, the Great Hall and the tower housing Professor Dumbledore's office are off to the left,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: NPR, The Hill, ABC, New York Times, ABC, Denver Post, Chicago Tribune, AP, Hollywood Reporter, Concord Monitor "There is a certain ... audacity to this announcement." Democratic Sen. Barack Obama, announcing that he is...
Prick Up Your Rabbit Ears; the Antenna, That Relic of the Pre-Cable Age, Gets an Afterlife Thanks to High-Definition TV
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts When cable TV arrived in the ' 70s, rabbit ears seemed destined to go the way of the polyester pantsuit. So, too, the clunky outdoor antenna, a rooftop fixture that once upon a time signaled the rise of television in American...
Rapid Descent; Lisa Nowak Had Been to Space, but Now She's Wound Up in Police Custody after Allegedly Attacking a Romantic Rival. How an Astronaut Snapped
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Gretel C. Kovach, Jonathan Mummolo, Alexandra Gekas and Lynn Waddell) Lisa Nowak was a super-mom. She helped raise three kids--a teenage son and twin 5-year-old daughters. She cooked and baked, preparing sumptuous...
Rehab Reality Check; as the Traditional Treatment Centers Do Battle with Glitzy Newcomers, Everyone Is Debating What Works
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Anne Underwood, Raina Kelley, Karen Springen and Karen Breslau) The time is coming-- perhaps even within the decade--when doctors will treat alcoholism with a pill. As they improve their understanding of the biochemistry...
Rumors of War
***** CORRECTION: In "Rumors Of War" (Feb. 19), we said a third American aircraft carrier "will likely follow" two other carrier groups to the gulf. The Navy says the USS Nimitz is scheduled to replace the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, one of the other...
So You Want to Be a Comedian
Byline: Walter Shapiro (Shapiro is the Washington bureau chief of Salon.com.) It started on my 14th birthday in 1961, when my parents gave me a copy of "Inside Shelley Berman," an album by the young comic (now an octogenarian, he plays Larry David's...
Target: U.S. Choppers
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Dan Ephron Six U.S. choppers (including two belonging to a private security company) have crashed in Iraq since Jan. 20, killing a total of 27. Investigators have concluded four were shot down and are still sifting through...
The Boomer Files: The Way We Laughed; the Generation That Grew Up with Mad Magazine and the Vietnam War Created Its Own Brand of Irreverent Comedy
Byline: David Noonan The gap-toothed, jug-eared idiot gazes out from the cover of the magazine, lost in a state of moronic bliss. The face is familiar, for sure--with that stupid smile, like Ron Howard's Opie with a lobotomy--but it is not quite...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Our history with Iran is, to say the least, a checkered one. In the 1950s, under President Eisenhower, a CIA operation restored a pro-American shah to power; in the 1960s, the Ayatollah Khomeini was exiled; in the 1970s, the...
The Stubborn Welfare State
***** CORRECTION: CLARIFICATION: In this column, I showed the shares of federal spending going to defense, payments to individuals (Social Security, Medicare etc.), interest on the debt and everything else (schools, the environment, criminal justice,...
This Finn Is A Real Shark; in a New Novel, Huck's Pap Is Scarier Than You Remember
Byline: David Gates Finn," by first-time novelist Jon Clinch, seems like your usual standing-on-the-shoulders-of-giants contraption. Its main character is Huckleberry Finn's alcoholic father, who cuts such a scary figure in Mark Twain's novel. Clinch...
Tomorrow, Tomorrow; There Is No Better Way to Support Those Fighting in Iraq Than to Guarantee That No More of Them Die in the Service of Political Miscalculation
Byline: Anna Quindlen Tomorrow. That's when the United States should begin to bring combat forces home from Iraq. Today would be a better option, but already it's tomorrow in Baghdad, in the Green Zone fortress Americans have built in the center...
Toy Business: American Girl, on the March
Byline: Karen Springen Beth Miller--an Atlanta mother with daughters 5, 7 and 12 years old--will visit the new American Girl doll store when it opens in her city this fall. "I'm sure I will have to," she says. AG owner Mattel is counting on moms...
What's the Deal with the Diapers?
Byline: Alexandra Gekas The sad story of astronaut turned accused stalker Lisa Nowak raises so many questions. Why didn't NASA testing screen out what appears to be a case of obsessive attraction? What is it about William Oefelein that evidently...