Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 2

A Good Drink at the Sink
Byline: Karen Breslau Nothing irks salt Lake City Mayor Ross (Rocky) Anderson more than seeing people tote water in plastic bottles. In fact, he argues, his city has some of the best tap water in the country. Several months ago, Anderson instructed...
A New Cheney-Gonzales Mystery
Byline: Michael Isikoff A new battle has erupted over Vice President Dick Cheney's refusal to submit to an executive order requiring a government review of his handling of classified documents. But the dispute could also raise questions for embattled...
Beliefwatch: Shrine
Byline: Lisa Miller Carole Pizzolante, from Ontario, Canada, is standing in a historic church in New York City, and she is trying not to cry. Before her is a wall, plastered with the faces of people killed on 9/11. "It's all so bloody senseless,...
Bloomberg's Knightly Ambitions
Byline: Evan Thomas and Jonathan Darman (With Eleanor Clift, Mark Hosenball, Richard Wolffe, Johnnie L. Roberts, Eleazar David Melendez, Sanhita Sen and Roya Wolverson) He is a short (5-foot-7) Jewish man from Massachusetts in a mostly Christian...
Bloomberg to the Rescue? He Is Said to Represent 'Post-Partisanship,' but If So-If He Is Not a Partisan of Any Large, Controversial Causes-Why Is He Needed?
Byline: George F. Will George Washington Plunkitt (1842-1924), who practiced what he cheerfully called "honest graft" on behalf of Tammany Hall (and himself), made up with pith what he lacked in polish when he explained: "I seen my opportunities...
Dispatch from Iran; Iranians May Have Lost Faith in the Mullahs, but They're Not about to Overthrow Them
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With Babak Pirouz in Tehran and Mark Hosenball in Washington) Where the heck are the mullahs? And what happened to all those angry young Revolutionary Guards eager to take you hostage--or, at the very least, spit in your face...
How to Think like a Scientist
Byline: Sharon Begley Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes containing about 20,000 genes, DNA is the molecule that carries hereditary information in every living cell, matter is made of atoms that are built of protons and neutrons and electrons and...
Mail Call: Helping Loved Ones Battle a Cruel Disease
Readers underscored the heartbreak and emotional toll experienced by Alzheimer's family caregivers and the hard lessons learned. One described his mother's painful ordeal as "a flickering light bulb, sometimes on and often off." Another said, "Life...
Make Thee A Comedy
Byline: Nicki Gostin Steve carell, the 40-Year-Old Virgin, is back this summer with "Evan Almighty," a retelling of the Noah's Ark story. He spoke to Nicki Gostin. I wouldn't have pegged you as the star of a religious movie. It's based on...
Perspectives: Quotes in the News
"His cruel veto says 'no' to the hopes of millions." Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, on President George W. Bush's block of a bill to allow federal funding to embryonic-stem-cell research "America does not have any intention of being the...
Rudy: 'Swift Boat-Able' on 9/11?
Byline: Jonathan Darman As Rudy Giuliani's presidential campaign rolls along, there are more and more voices protesting that he's not the 9/11 hero America considers him to be. First among them: some firefighters. Many in New York City blame the...
Tech's Partying like 1999. Uh-Oh
Byline: Steve Levy Once again, the Silicon Valley is partying like it's 1999. And, once again, skeptics are warning of a big fat bubble that will inevitably pop, leaving investors in the red and geeks on the unemployment line. Are the skeptics right?...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham I was reminded of one of the joys of this job one afternoon last week. The sun was sinking over the West Side of Manhattan when I sat down to read the essays that make up the Special Report on "What You Need to Know" in this...
The Family Road Trip: Strangers in a Minivan; When I Was Young, Driving Cross-Country Was a Shared Experience. Today, We're All Traveling Solo
Byline: Lisa Segelman (Segelman lives in Randolph, N.J.) For our most recent vacation we decided to thumb our noses at pricey airline tickets, long-term parking and car-rental fees. Instead, we'd drive. We planned to motor south to Florida from...
The Mayor's Veep Scenario
Byline: Jonathan Alter Mike Bloomberg is a long shot to be the next president. Even a trillion dollars couldn't change that. But Bloomberg's vast fortune and reputation for competent management may yet make him vice president. Before jumping down...
The Myth of Boyhood
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Picture a world where your father walks with you down a starlit road, pausing to point out Orion. He recites Robert Frost, knows how a battery works--and all the rules about girls. "The Dangerous Book for Boys," by brothers...
True or False: American Athletes Rule
Byline: Mark Starr The starry aggregate of America's "Dream Team" at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics was so dazzling that even the opposition was charmed by its Magic, as well as its Larry and Michael. Two years later at the world championships, Dream...
True or False: 'Idol' Airs in Every Continent but Antarctica
Byline: Lorraine Ali They're bungling ballads in Kazakhstan, mauling Bollywood favorites in India and shout-singing Beyonce numbers in Bolivia. Most every country--even those that lack running water and free elections--has its own version of "American...
True or False: Jane Austen Outsells Alice Walker and Ann Coulter
Byline: David Gates Jane Austen probably can't compete yet with Shakespeare or Dickens--and certainly not with the Bible--for the greatest number of adaptations, tie-ins, tchotchkes and other epiphenomena. Dickens has a theme park in Chatham, England,...
True or False: The Major Religions Are Essentially Alike
Byline: Stephen Prothero (Prothero is the chair of Boston University's Department of Religion and the author of "Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know--And Doesn't.") At least since the first petals of the counterculture bloomed...
True or False: U.S.'S Broadband Penetration Is Lower Than Even Estonia's
Byline: Steven Levy Maybe our proud nation is going through some rough spots, but at least we have one shining and perpetual triumph: the Internet. People may refer to it as the World Wide Web, but its capital is Silicon Valley and the United States...
We Are Losing the War against Radical Islam
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Republicans and Democrats, conservatives and liberals, are strangely united on one point: the threat from global jihad is growing dangerously. Republicans use that belief as a way to remind the American people that we live...
What Kills One Woman Every Minute of Every Day? A. Heart Attack; B. AIDS; C. Childbirth
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Throughout most of human history childbirth has been the leading killer of women. That's still true today, even when modern medicine has the power to virtually eliminate maternal mortality. Somewhere in the world, one...
What's the Biggest Threat to the U. S. Economy? A. Higher Oil Prices; B. A Prolonged Housing Slump; C. A Steep Rise in Personal Savings; D. A Big Hedge-Fund Failure
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If you picked savings, go to the head of the class. For 25 years, Americans have been on a collective shopping spree, aided by a historic collapse of the personal-saving rate. In the early 1980s, U.S. consumers saved...
What You Need to Know Now
Byline: Jon Meacham Twenty summers ago, in 1987, as the shadows fell on the Reagan years, a professor of English at the University of Virginia, E. D. Hirsch, published a surprise best seller: "Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know."...
When Does Your Brain Stop Making New Neurons? A. Infant; B. 42 Years Old; C. 53 Years Old
***** CORRECTION: In "Links Between Past and Present" ("What You Need to Know Now," July 9), we should have said that the Pakicetus, which was found in 1980, is an ancestor of ancient whales and a descendant of four-legged land mammals, not the...
Where Will the2008 Presidential Race Be Decided? A. the Northwest; B. the Southwest; C. the Plains States; D. the South; E. North-South Border States
Byline: Howard Fineman In the wide southwestern arc of the country, which stretches from Fresno, Calif., and Las Vegas through Phoenix and Albuquerque, N.M., to Houston, millions of Americans--and millions of want-to-be Americans, here legally or...
Which Actress Made A Movie That Grossed over $200 Million? A. Reese Witherspoon; B. Halle Berry; C. Julia Roberts; D. Nia Vardalos
Byline: David Ansen and Sean Smith The last year that Hollywood's No. 1 box-office hit focused on a woman was 1964. The movie? "Mary Poppins." The next year Julie Andrews was again anointed box-office champ, thanks to a film about a certain singing...
Which Is the Most Influential Work of Art of the Last 100 Years? A. Black Square by Kazimir Malevich; B. 'One (Number 31) ' by Jackson Pollack; C. 'Fountain' by Marcel Duchamp; D. 'Campbell's Soup Can' by Andy Warhol; E. 'Les Demoiselles D'Avignon' by Pablo Picasso
Byline: Peter Plagens When Matisse saw Picasso's just-completed, eight-foot-square painting "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon" in the Spaniard's studio in a ramshackle Paris building nicknamed "The Laundry Boat," he was shocked at how raw, cacophonic and...
Which of These Is Not Causing Global Warming Today? A. Sport Utility Vehicles; B. Rice Fields; C. Increased Solar Output
Byline: Sharon Begley and Andrew Murr When 600 climate scientists from 40 countries reported in February that there was, for the first time, "unequivocal" evidence that the world is warming and greater than 90 percent certainty that man-made greenhouse...