Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 04, July 28

A Chicken Little Tale for Adults
Byline: Daniel Gross 'The overwhelming majority of banks in this country continue to be well capitalized,' assures FDIC chairman Sheila Bair. In ordinary times, a public discussion on deposit insurance would hold all the frisson of a seminar...
After the 'Surge'
Byline: Nisid Hajari Iraq is entering a murky interregnum period. To see what peace looks like in Baghdad, go to the Karrada district. At dusk, Iraqi families picnic in a thin stretch of park recently built on the banks of the Tigris River. A...
All Umbrage All the Time
Byline: Jonathan Alter A day rarely passes in this campaign without someone's taking grave offense to something. A reader logging on as Kellyb last week posted a comment on a Politico.com story covering the funeral of former White House spokesman...
An Empty Seat and an Exotic Getaway
Byline: Michael Isikoff House Democrats were fuming recently when Karl Rove defied a congressional subpoena and refused to show up at a House Judiciary Committee hearing into whether he meddled in Justice Department prosecutions. Instead of grilling...
An Equal-Opportunity Crackdown?
Byline: Jessica Bennett and Mary Chapman It's 90 degrees in downtown Flint, Mich., and Jayson Miguel is shirtless in a pair of gray sweatpants. He's hanging out, minding his own--and breaking the law. It's not that he's loitering, it's his pants:...
Conservatism: Not TBTF
Byline: George F. Will In recent weeks, two formerly bright lines of political demarcation have become indistinct, to Barack Obama's advantage. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's statement last week that economic conditions are "skewed to...
Gillian's Still a Bit Spacey
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Gillian Anderson reprises her role as Agent Dana Scully in "The X-Files: I Want to Believe." She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. I've got to confess. I don't know anything about "The X-Files." OK. Why is it such a big deal?...
He Had New York at His Feet
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Philippe Petit walked on a wire--between the Trade Center towers. The view was magnificent. To the south, the Verrazano Bridge and the Statue of Liberty. To the east, the approaching sunrise, the sky turning from deep to...
Here's to You, Mr. Robbins
Byline: Julia Reed His breakfast was cereal topped with a scoop of B-R banana, and his backyard pool was shaped like an ice-cream cone. When I was a child, I loved visiting my mother's family in Nashville every summer, not least because there...
Islam Bullish in A Bear Market
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Grace Wyler The Amana funds, invested according to Sharia, have more than doubled since 2003, to $1.3 billion. The funny thing about faith-based mutual funds is, well, that there's anything called a faith-based mutual...
It's Still Not Easy Being Green
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh 'Anne of Green Gables' turns 100 this year, but she's the most modern girl in the bookstore. Jeannette Arsenault runs an "Anne of Green Gables" souvenir shop with enough knickknacks to make eBay jealous. She sells "Anne...
Living A Second Life Online
Byline: Jessica Bennett We've all heard the warnings: addiction, isolation, a waste of time. But some 50 million people log on to online role-playing games like The Sims and Second Life--and many of them never log off. The makers of a new documentary...
Obama Abroad
Byline: Fareed Zakaria He's been called a naive idealist. But in terms of foreign policy, he's the true realist in the race. The rap on Barack Obama, at least in the realm of foreign policy, has been that he is a softheaded idealist who thinks...
Perspectives
"We are overloaded with money, crazy amounts of money." Russian economics professor Mikhail Bergen, contrasting the surging growth of once fragile developing economies like Russia's with the deepening financial crises in the world's richest nations...
Seeing Shades of the 1930s
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Daniel Stone The government's efforts to keep Fannie and Freddie afloat have a lot in common with the New Deal. On Tuesday and Wednesday, Federal reserve chairman Ben Bernanke, a scholar of the epic financial meltdown...
Subsidized in the City
Byline: Melody Serafino; Serafino Lives In New York City. Adulthood means financial independence. So why do so many of my peers still live off their parents? For the recent college graduate, living in New York--the city of dreams and opportunity--is...
Surviving the Bank Crisis
Byline: Linda Stern Last week's banking news--the federal government stepped in to shore up mortgage-buying giants Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and to take over the bad-loan dependent IndyMac Bank--left many consumers in a panic. But some experts...
Taking Away Olympic Fun
Byline: Mary Hennock And Manuela Zoninsein The stage at D22 had fallen silent. Authorities clamped down on the Beijing rock club earlier this month for lacking a performance license. "There was no notice," says owner Michael Pettis. The Chinese...
The Aide Who Went to War
Byline: Richard Wolffe How a year in Iraq changed an Obama adviser Mark Lippert is hardly the kind of man most people would expect to find as Barack Obama's longest-serving foreign-policy adviser. The buzz-cut Navy reservist has just returned...
The Art of Politics
Byline: Jerry Adler What happens when world leaders get creative. Hint: it isn't always pretty. In their idle moments, historians occasionally speculate on how the world would be different if Adolf Hitler had passed the entrance exam to the Art...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Five months ago, we sent Ramin Setoodeh to California to investigate the murder of a 15-year-old gay student by one of his classmates. The case, with its echoes of the Matthew Shepard killing, had made national headlines....
The Politics of Gitmo
Byline: Michael Isikoff A federal judge's ruling last week threw a potential new curveball into the campaign debate over the War on Terror. Democratic appointed Judge James Robertson gave the Pentagon a green light to start the first-ever military-commission...
The Royal Squeeze
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz; With Tiffanie Wen Buckingham Palace needs a redo, but like the rest of us, Her Majesty is feeling the financial pinch. The lawn was a perfect emerald green, the roses were in lush bloom and the palace--well, it is...
The Story of His Life
Byline: Howard Fineman No adviser is closer to John McCain than Mark Salter, whose prose has shaped how we see the senator. How will the climactic chapter read? If the need arises and the range is close, Mark Salter will edit John McCain in midsentence....
What Should Uncle Sam Do?
Byline: Robert Reich, Larry Lindsey, Jeremy J. Siegel, John Snow, Robert Rubin, Peter Wallison NEWSWEEK's Business Roundtable takes stock of the real damage--and offer solutions to the economic crisis. A Modest Proposal Robert Reich, secretary...
When the Good Guys Are the Bad Guys
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh; With Reporting By Hussam Ali The Iraqi Army has regained control from militias in Basra. Now it faces a new foe: the government. Mohammed Waeli was furious. The powerful governor of Basra had heard that Iraqi Army...
When Wynton Met Willie
Byline: Lorraine Ali Marsalis and Nelson are an odd musical couple, but they make the sweetest blues you've ever heard. Wynton wears crisp suits, reads sheet music and is the musical director of New York's Jazz at Lincoln Center. Willie wears...
Who's the Pariah Now?
Byline: Lally Weymouth Israel's outgoing ambassador to the U.N. says the world needs to keep pressure on Iran. Being the ambassador from Israel has never been a good way to make friends at the United Nations. But Dan Gillerman says that over...
Why Won't Juan Come to the Phone?
Byline: Jessica Ramirez And Holly Bailey McCain's Hispanic outreach chief is both loved and loathed. The job of Juan Hernandez is to win support for John McCain, particularly Latino votes. So it may seem odd that the campaign doesn't want its...
You Can Go Home Again
Byline: David Ansen 'Brideshead Revisited' was once a classic 11-part miniseries. A new film tells the tale in two hours. Anyone who fell in love with the landmark 11-part British TV series of "Brideshead Revisited" 26 years ago is likely to...
Young, Gay and Murdered
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh; With Andrew Murr And Jennifer Ordonez Kids are coming out younger, but are schools ready to handle the complex issues of identity and sexuality? For Larry King, the question had tragic implications. At 15, Lawrence King...