Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 05, August 3

A Bridge Too Far
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Arian Campo-Flores Residency restrictions have forced child sex offenders in Florida to camp out under a causeway. Now the man who helped put them there is having second thoughts. In 1996 Ron and Pat book hired a nanny...
America's New Nightmare
Byline: Ron Moreau; With Michael Hirsh, John Barry, and Mark Hosenball in Washington If you thought the longtime head of the Taliban was bad, you should meet his no. 2. Soon after 4,000 U.S. marines flooded into Afghanistan's Helmand River Valley...
Chanel: Coco Puffs
Byline: Ginanne Brownell There is a wonderfully subtle (if historically inaccurate) scene in the new biopic Coco Before Chanel in which the 20-something, not-yet-a-fashion-doyenne is asked by her lover "Boy" Capel to attend a summer ball with him...
Climate-Change Calculus
Byline: Sharon Begley; Begley Is Newsweek's Science Editor. Why it's even worse than we feared. Among the phrases you really, really do not want to hear from climate scientists are: "that really shocked us," "we had no idea how bad it was," and...
Escaping the Chains of Grief
Byline: Norman Ollestad; Ollestad is the author of Crazy for the Storm: A Memoir of Survival. When I read about 14-year-old -Bahia Bakari, the sole survivor of a Yemeni jetliner crash off the coast of the Comoros, I wondered: How will she handle...
Free Maziar Bahari
NEWSWEEK reporter, filmmaker, playwright, author, artist, and, since June 21, prisoner. For the past five weeks Maziar Bahari, 42, a Canadian-Iranian journalist and film director, has been held in Tehran's Evin Prison without access to his family...
Gitmo Woes
Byline: Michael Isikoff White House officials last week tried to downplay their decision to postpone by six months a key report on what to do with Guantanamo detainees when the facility is shut down. But the delay reflects the daunting political...
Health 'Reform' That Isn't
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson; Samuelson is the author of The Great -Inflation and Its Aftermath. Despite the rhetoric, costs will rise. The most misused word in the health-care debate is "reform." Everyone wants reform, but what constitutes reform...
It's Time to Leave Somalia
Byline: Andrew Bast Somalia has become synonymous with the term "failed state." Even now, after nearly two decades of civil war and a dismaying string of failed foreign interventions, the end of the country's long humanitarian catastrophe seems...
It's Time to Pony Up
Byline: Daniel Lyons; Lyons Is Newsweek's Technology Columnist And Author Of The Fake Steve Jobs Blog. Why good Web sites shouldn't be free. Back in the last downturn, in 2001, Jason Katz realized he was in trouble. His fledgling Web site, Paltalk,...
Mullah Baradar: In His Own Words
Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar has been in day-to-day command of the Afghan insurgency ever since the Taliban's founder and leader, Mullah Mohammed Omar, disappeared from view roughly three years ago. NEWSWEEK hand-delivered a list of questions for Baradar...
On Iran, Do Nothing. Yet
Byline: Fareed Zakaria; Zakaria is the editor of NEWSWEEK International. Tehran needs to work out its turmoil. What is happening in Iran? On the surface, the country has returned to normalcy. Demonstrations have become infrequent, and have been...
Our Man in Afghanistan
Byline: Evan Thomas; With Michael Hirsh in Washington Ambassador Richard Holbrooke is a man in a hurry, working in a land that can seem to defy time. His mission, as special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, is to achieve some measure...
Pollen Nation
Byline: Tracy McNicoll To make a pint and a half of honey, a honeybee treks from flower to flower to flower, almost a million times. That's about 25,000 honeybee air miles, or the distance around the world at the equator. Of course, a bee's world...
Progressive Education
Byline: Louisa Thomas In august 1910, Teddy Roosevelt climbed on top of a kitchen table in Osawatomie, Kans., and gave one of the defining speeches of his life. "Ruin in its worst form is inevitable," he said, "if our national life brings us nothing...
Steaks, Pragmatism, and the View from the Delta
Byline: Jon Meacham At first, there was something comforting in the predictability of the evening's conversation. At Doe's Eat Place on Nelson Street in Greenville, Miss., last Wednesday, within the space of perhaps five minutes, I was twice told...
The Case of the Disappearing Rabbit
Byline: Lily Huang Ten million acres of the American West may depend on the fate of the vanishing snowshoe hare. In the roadless, snow-muffled backcountry of northwestern Montana lies your best chance of ever seeing a wild Canada lynx. An improbable...
The Recession Is Over
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Nick Summers and Jessica Ramirez in New York, and Eve Conant and Daniel Stone in Washington Now what we need is a new kind of recovery. In Westport, Mass., about 60 miles southwest of Boston, traffic crawls along Route...
The Sotomayor Test
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick; Lithwick also writes for Slate.com. Will she limit Obama's next pick? Throughout the weeks leading up to the confirmation hearings of Judge Sonia Sotomayor, one often heard that President Obama was thinking in threes....
The Writing on the Wall
Byline: Isia Jasiewicz It was a Sunday morning in 1989, and Gary Cooper was all over Warsaw. Nearly 10,000 posters, plastered around the city at daybreak, bore the image of the marshal from the 1952 Western High Noon. His photograph was black and...
What's Goin' on (in R&B)?
Byline: Seth Colter Walls If you're doing quality work within a genre, you don't tend to declare it dead. And then there's Maxwell, the R&B singer whose pouffy Afro and history-conscious music made him a leading sex symbol of '90s neo-soul....