Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 19, November 9

A Biography of the Biography
Byline: Malcolm Jones When was the last time a notable person with lots to hide (obsessive-compulsive disorder, a refusal to bathe, the fact that he wore wigs that didn't fit) insisted that his biographer measure and record every fault with seismographic...
A Few More Good Men
Byline: Jeremy Herb Gen. Stanley McChrystal will soon hear word on 40,000 reinforcements for Afghanistan. But how have his predecessors fared? When they've asked for more troops, have they gotten them? And has fulfilling their requests made a difference?...
Fired Is the New Retired
Byline: Ellis Cose The idiocy of axing older employees. This may be the worst time in the last 60 years to be old and looking for work. Some 6.8 percent of workers over 55 are unemployed (not as bad as for younger workers, but still a historic...
Gay Marriage & Marijuana
Byline: Jacob Weisberg You can't stop either. Why that's good. "I think this would be a good time for a beer," Franklin D. Roosevelt said upon signing a bill that made 3.2 percent lager legal, ahead of the full repeal of Prohibition. I hope Barack...
Heaven Can Wait
Byline: Jerry Adler A new book promises incontrovertible proof of the afterlife. That's cold comfort to those of us left behind. On a spring day last year, three months after the death of my younger son, Max, I opened my front door and saw a...
I'll Leave for Peace
Byline: Amir Cheshin; Cheshin is the coauthor of Separate and Unequal: The Inside Story of Israeli Rule in East Jerusalem. Sometimes you can live next to people for years and not know exactly what they think. I gave an interview to a local paper...
Misplaced Fears
Byline: Matt Frei; Frei anchors BBC World News America weeknights on BBC America.Frei Germany is no strutting colossus. After the Berlin Wall fell and the two Germanys began grappling awkwardly with reunification, a joke made the rounds: "It's...
One Step Forward, Two Steps Back
Byline: Michael Hirsh After Iran agreed to nuclear concessions on Oct. 1, President Obama said it was a "constructive beginning." But now, U.S. officials and Western diplomats say, Tehran is backtracking. With a year-end deadline approaching to...
Q&A: Calista Flockhart
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh It's been 12 years since Calista Flockhart started dancing with an imaginary baby, and now, Ally McBeal is finally back--on DVD. Flockhart spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. It took seven long years from the time Ally McBeal ended...
Recycling Won't Save Us, but Greed Might
Byline: Jon Meacham I grew up in the 1970s, in the first decade of Earth Days, and can recall brief presentations at my Episcopal Montessori (a bit redundant, that) about pollution, recycling, and gas mileage. To be honest, the subject did not interest...
Rocket Men
Byline: Jeremy McCarter Politicians won't get us back into the space race, but novelists just might. Six months ago, President Obama asked a team of academics, astronauts, and aerospace executives to give him options for the future of the space...
Scrap Cap-and-Trade
Byline: Karl Rove Climate-change legislation that doesn't add up. There's much debate about the efficacy of controlling pollutants with economic incentives, also known as cap-and-trade. Its advocates dress it up with a lot of moral indignation....
Survival of the Weakest
Byline: Sharon Begley Why Neanderthals went extinct. Thanks to recent discoveries that they were canny hunters, clever toolmakers, and probably endowed with the gift of language, Neanderthals have overcome some of the nastier calumnies hurled...
Teddy's Rightful Heir
Byline: Jonathan Alter Alan Khazei should get his seat. Ted Kennedy's death got plenty of coverage, but the battle to replace him in the Senate has been overshadowed by elections this week in New Jersey and Virginia. While all four candidates...
The Boom in the Gloom
Byline: Rana Foroohar; With Jerry Guo in New York Why markets are spiking up despite the dismal economy, and how this could end in another crash. For the past several months, investors have been acting like it's 1999, the first year when the...
The Crowd in Arsenio's Hall
Byline: Joshua Alston Wanda Sykes was once offered what many comics would call the fantasy job--her own nighttime talk show--but she turned it down. Between stand-up gigs, movie roles, and her part on The New Adventures of Old Christine, she was...
The Evolution of an Eco-Prophet
Byline: Sharon Begley Al Gore's views on climate change are advancing as rapidly as the phenomenon itself. Al Gore steps onto the portico of his century-old white colonial, its stately columns framing him and the black Lab mix, Bojangles, that...
The Lost Decade
Byline: Daniel Lyons Why Steve Ballmer is no Bill Gates. Last month Microsoft rolled out Windows 7 and opened the first of a chain of new retail stores. As usual with such announcements, there's been loads of hoopla and ginned-up excitement....
The Phantom Venice
Byline: Barbie Nadeau Henry James fell in love with a Venice you and I will never know. Sure, the sun still sets into the sea with the same purply iridescence that James found mesmerizing. His "slimy bricks and battered marble" are still there....
The Plan That Saved the Planet
Byline: Al Gore A reality that's still within reach. Not too many years from now, a new generation will look back at us in this hour of choosing and ask one of two questions. Either they will ask, "What were you thinking? Didn't you see the entire...
The Quiet Power of Europe
Byline: Stefan Theil It's often easy to view Europe as an aging continent in terminal decline. Pundits and politicians lament that the European Union is weak, riven by conflict, and unable to translate its size and wealth into hard power. Or, as...
Up against a Wall of Debt
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson How much can governments borrow? The idea that the government of a major advanced country would default on its debt--that is, tell lenders that it won't repay them all they're owed--was, until recently, a preposterous...