Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 01, January 4

A Way Forward for Republicans
Byline: Andrew Romano Right now congressional Republicans seem to have only one guiding principle: everything Obama does is wrong, even if it's something they believe in (case in point: Medicare cuts). But reactionary obstructionism isn't a political...
Bill Clinton
Byline: Jon Meacham From his vantage point as a global philanthropist, the former president talks about the 21st century's interdependent world as it is--and as it could be, if we do the right things. Meacham: What are the issues you think are...
Bill Maher & Joe Scarborough
The two talk-show hosts go mano a mano on Obama's shortcomings, Republican rage, and a Scarborough-Maher presidential ticket. Scarborough: So, liberal comedians were wringing their hands a year ago in The New York Times over the prospect of telling...
Conventional Wisdom 2009
Diehard climate-change deniers, death-panel hypesters, seething teabaggers, gun-toting town-hall screamers--what a year. Is this the same country that elected Barack Obama with a strong majority? Here's to a more civil decade. The Beltway UP-Obama...
David Cameron
Byline: Stryker McGuire The 43-year-old leader of Britain's Conservative Party is on track to become the first Tory prime minister since 1997. Then the real work begins. McGuire: What decisions would you take at the outset that would distinguish...
David Petraeus
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The general whose surge turned the tide in Iraq--and who aims to do the same in Afghanistan--may hold the fate of Obama's presidency in his hands. Zakaria: In 2003, after the fall of Baghdad, you were placed in northern...
Don't Forget America's Other War
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Remember Iraq? For months our attention has been focused on Afghanistan, and you can be sure that the surge will be covered exhaustively as it unfolds in 2010. But the coming year could be even more pivotal in Iraq. The country...
Douglas Holtz-Eakin
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The top economic adviser to John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign sounds off about auto bailouts, health-care reform, and why Obama's fiscal policies don't make the grade. Samuelson: If John McCain had won, would...
Eric Holder Jr
Byline: Daniel Klaidman The attorney general of the United States on investigating torture, closing Guantanamo -- and a certain former vice president. Klaidman: The last time I saw Sharon [Malone, Holder's wife], she had this to say about you...
Gone but Not Forgotten
"Some people are so afraid to die," said Henry Van Dyke, "that they never begin to live." One thing these people--the senator and the dancer, the preacher and the pop star, the historian and the Angel--had in common? It wasn't true for any of them....
Hamid Karzai
Byline: Lally Weymouth U.S. troops won't start coming home unless the Afghan president--the victor in August's scandal-marred election--can clean up his government and win back his own people. Weymouth: What do you foresee for the coming year...
Hillary Clinton & Henry Kissinger
Byline: Jon Meacham Two of the most prominent secretaries of state in recent history talk about presidents, priorities--and the difficulty of winding down wars. Meacham: What has surprised you most since becoming secretary of state? Clinton:...
James Cameron & Peter Jackson
Byline: Conversation conducted by Ramin Setoodeh. Their films 'Avatar' and 'The Lovely Bones' are competing at the box office, but here the kings of CGI find common ground on acting, special effects, and the art of storytelling. Cameron: So how's...
Jeff Bezos
Byline: Daniel Lyons Since founding Amazon in 1994, he has revolutionized retailing. Now he's out to transform how we read. lyons: Amazon had an amazing year despite the bad economy. How did you do it? Bezos: It is the basics. It is focusing...
Nancy Pelosi
Byline: Eleanor Clift To conservatives, the speaker of the House personifies big government in the age of Obama. But it's liberals she seems destined to disappoint. Clift: You are seen as this far-out liberal, when you actually are quite traditional....
Obama's War on Terror
Byline: Daniel Klaidman During the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama vowed to roll back Bush-era abuses and restore the proper balance between security and freedom. A few days after being sworn in, he elated progressives by banning torture, beginning...
Perspectives 2009
January 4 'No! You can go back to your, what do you call it, your Google, and you figure out all that.' Former president George H.W. Bush, declining to elaborate on a remark he made during an interview in which he said there were "some things"...
The View from People Who Make a Difference
Byline: Jon Meacham In the White House, John F. Kennedy offered Ben Bradlee one of the finer definitions of our craft. "What makes journalism so fascinating and biography so interesting," JFK remarked, is "the struggle to answer that single question:...
Timothy Geithner
Byline: Daniel Gross The Treasury secretary was largely responsible for directing the federal government's response to the financial crisis. He's still got his work cut out for him. Gross: After moving to Washington, you put your house in suburban...
Tim Pawlenty
Byline: Howard Fineman He doesn't have Sarah Palin's pizzazz or Mitt Romney's money. But the governor of Minnesota may be a shrewd Republican bet in 2012. Fineman: Governor, for our year-end issue, we wanted to interview intriguing people...
Valerie Jarrett
Byline: Jeffrey Bartholet One of Obama's oldest friends and most trusted advisers on the personal constraints of White House life--and the occasional urge to break free. Bartholet: How is [the president] adapting to life in the bubble? It was...