Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 16, October 18

A Fine Romance
Byline: Joshua Alston To Monica and David, no aspect of the American Dream is off limits. Who among us can resist a tale of all-consuming true love? Within everyone there is a true romantic, a cellular understanding of how intoxicating, maddening,...
Al Qaeda Gets Its Wish
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Al Qaeda is achieving a long-time dream: to assemble a force of trained jihadis who hold Western passports. A Pakistani intelligence source, requesting anonymity to talk about sensitive matters, says a particular...
An Offer They Wouldn't Refuse
Byline: Pat Wingert How one district lured top principals to rescue its failing schools. A new principal with no experience seems an odd choice to turn around a long-failing school. But that's exactly whom most superintendents around the country...
Big Oil in a Blue Suit
Byline: George F. Will The energy future will look familiar. Irving, Texas--Published at the apogee of Barack Obama's apotheosis, the April 2009 issue of Conde Nast Portfolio, a business magazine, faulted ExxonMobil for not joining the green...
Clint Squints at the Afterlife
Byline: David Ansen At 80, this surprising director continues to throw us curves. Clint Eastwood flirted with the supernatural in his allegorical Western Pale Rider, but nothing in his career prepares us for his haunting and haunted Hereafter,...
Could Cool Hand Luke Bust out Today?
Byline: Nick Summers Not likely. The number of inmates who escape or go AWOL from prison has plummeted--even as the total correctional population has surged 68 percent, to 2.3 million. John Moriarty, inspector-general of the Texas criminal-justice...
Decades of War May Be over in Turkey
Byline: Owen Matthews After 36 years and more than 40,000 dead, one of the world's bloodiest and longest-running insurgencies--the separatist struggle of Turkey's Kurds--could soon be over. Last week Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan hinted that...
Geek TV
Byline: Daniel Lyons Computer makers take over the tube. For the past few years, tech companies have been trying to find a way to bring the Internet and television to-gether, without much success. Sure, there are lots of little boxes you can...
Injustice, Texas Style
Byline: Jonathan Alter Restoring Cameron Willingham's reputation. "Why would you abolish the death penalty when a majority of the voters support it?" Republican Tom Foley asked Democrat Dan Malloy in a robust debate last week to help determine...
Made for China
Byline: Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop and Rana Foroohar With Western markets sagging, luxury firms are tailoring products to the Middle Kingdom. Conspicuous consumption may be out of fashion in the West. But in China, the luxury-goods business is booming,...
Not a 'Weak Creature'
Byline: Lisa Miller A mystic and the modern woman. Lest one imagine that female achievement and ambition is a new phenomenon, the life of Hildegard von Bingen stands as a stark corrective. Hildegard lived in the 12th century. Born to a noble...
Sweet Virginia
Byline: Lisa Miller The wife of Justice Clarence Thomas is a Tea Party activist. Together, they're the right's new power couple. Justice Clarence Thomas probably had a ho-hum day on June 7, 2010. From time to time, the Supreme Court of the United...
The Anti-Gaga
Byline: Lorraine Ali Ke$ha's music has been called 'repulsive, obnoxious, and ridiculously catchy.' She'll take that as a compliment, thank you very much. It's the morning before the MTV Video Music Awards, and Ke$ha still hasn't had her nails...
The Jobs Slog
Byline: Eleanor Clift For the democrats, there's no escaping last Friday's gloomy jobs report, the final Labor Department numbers that will be released before the November elections. So what's a party with ownership over an epically bad economy...
The New Oil
Byline: Jeneen Interlandi Should private companies control our most precious natural resource? Sitka, Alaska, is home to one of the world's most spectacular lakes. Nestled into a U-shaped valley of dense forests and majestic peaks, and fed by...
The Warlord Imam
Byline: Anna Nemtsova and Owen Matthews The Kremlin's poster boy for moderate Islam may be radicalizing the region. The video shows a gun barrel jutting from the rear window of a shiny black Lada sedan as it cruises slowly down Putin Prospect,...
The World's Their Oyster
Byline: Rana Foroohar Young Chinese see only opportunity. On a recent trip to China, I met with a group of students at Beijing's Tsinghua University--the Harvard of the Middle Kingdom. These young people were among the best and brightest that...
Up in Flames
Byline: Nisid Hajari and Ron Moreau Pakistan's proxies are killing American troops and blowing up their supplies. So, how exactly are we allies again? Of the two nations described jointly as "AfPak," one has nuclear weapons and the other doesn't....