Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 23, December 5

10 Books That You Might Have Missed but Shouldn't
A modern 'Arabian Nights' love story. Cameo portraits of Ernest Beckett's women. The war between Keynes and Hayek. Our list of the titles to soothe the soul and freshen the synapses. 'A History of the World in 100 Objects' By Neil MacGregor From...
A Case of the Hysterics
Byline: Casey Schwartz Is the debilitating medical condition mental, physical--or made up? Made famous in the 19th century by doctors like Jean-Martin Charcot and Sigmund Freud, hysteria was a fairly common diagnosis in that era. Symptoms included...
An 11-Year-Old I Know
Byline: Tyler Perry Hollywood's Tyler Perry writes to a young boy involved in the Penn State scandal to tell him he isn't a victim at all--he's a survivor. I don't know your name, but I know your face. I don't know your journey, but I know where...
Be Afraid. Be Very Afraid
Byline: Dan Lyons Supercomputers help build nuclear weapons, design aerospace engines, and produce lifesaving drugs. For years, the U.S. had the best and biggest arsenal. Until China got in the game. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is...
Can Marco Rubio Save the GOP?
Byline: Howard Kurtz Republicans have blown up their support among Hispanics with angry blasts on immigration-which puts the party's leading Latino right in the line of fire. If the Republican Party has a secret plan to alienate Hispanic voters,...
Hunger Diary
Byline: Alek Wek Africa is famished. America is fat. Sudanese-born model Alek Wek knows both worlds. I know how it feels to go hungry. When I was 7 years old, my family and I became trapped in our own home, huddled together amid the bullets and...
Interview: Alan Grayson
Byline: Lloyd Grove The liberal firebrand ex-congressman from Disney World, defeated in 2010 after one term, is running for a new House seat representing Orlando. You know what Washington's like. Why do you want to go back? I'd be down on the...
Italian Stallion
Byline: Barbie Latza Nadeau Playboy industrialist Lapo Elkann vows to rehabilitate Italy's image--just as he did his own. Sitting in his Milan studio at a sleek glass table made from the front half of a Fiat 500 car, Lapo Elkann is a bundle of...
Let There Be Newt!
How the religious right is learning to love the adulterous, thrice-married former speaker. By Michelle Goldberg Like many evangelicals in Iowa, Steve Deace, an influential conservative radio host, is wrestling with the possibility that Newt Gingrich...
My Favorite Mistake: Ricky Gervais
Ricky Gervais on throwing away an idea worth more than $1 billion. What's the biggest mistake of my career? Hmmm ... OK, put your hands down. I'm trying to pretend it's a difficult question because I haven't made any, not because there are too...
Sex Addiction and the City
Byline: Chris Lee Director Steve McQueen casts Manhattan as an erotic Disneyland in his latest film, 'Shame.' When Steve McQueen first heard of sex addiction as a phenomenon, the British director scoffed at the idea that sexaholics need sympathy,...
Shaking Up Shakespeare
Byline: Julie Kavanagh Ralph Fiennes's passion project and directorial debut, 'Coriolanus,' modernizes The Bard. Ralph Fiennes is known for making unpredictable choices as an actor. If he is best remembered as the fleshy and sadistic Nazi...
The Back Stabber's Campaign
With a year's worth of jabs and parries remaining, this season's political contest has already seen its share of betrayals. A guide to the most significant attacks. Roger Ailes / Sarah Palin (knife) Woe is she who double-crosses the king of conservative...
The Narcissist Decade
Diablo Cody, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of 'Juno,' tells us why our culture embraces self-absorption. In the past, I'll admit, I've enjoyed being compared to the protagonists in my screenplays. I'm tickled when friends say they Asee meA in spunky...
This Man Is Addicted to Sex
Byline: Chris Lee It wrecks marriages, destroys careers, and saps self-worth. Yet Americans are being diagnosed as sex addicts in re cord numbers. Inside an epidemic. This Man Is Addicted to Sex Valerie realized that sex was wrecking her life...
Wanted: A Financier in the White House
Byline: Niall Ferguson From the Tea Party to Occupy Wall Street, America is angry at elites. But Mitt Romney's business success makes him the best candidate by far. This column is for Ted Forstmann: financier, fun lover, and philanthropist, who...
What Recession, Darling?
Byline: Michael Gross People are pissed at the 1 percent. Will the super-rich learn to restrain their excesses? Don't bet on it. Sandy Weill is a lucky man. When the financier who built Citigroup decided to sell his penthouse at 15 Central Park...
Who You Calling Lazy?
Byline: Paul Begala The president and his GOP opponents tell us American workers have gotten soft. Hardly. Perhaps the best news I've heard in this dreary year is that Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band are gearing up for another tour. We...