Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 11, September 10

A SEAL's Other Daring Mission
Byline: Daniel Klaidman How the bin Laden-raid author sneaked past the Pentagon. Navy SEALS are taught to practice OPSEC, elaborate operational security tactics to preserve the element of surprise in carrying out missions. Former commando Matt...
A Statesman Bows Out
Byline: Leslie H. Gelb America's top diplomat on Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Taliban's weakness. This may stun the Washington cognoscenti, but America's coolest head and most knowledgeable diplomat on Afghanistan believes the recent spate of Afghans...
Bankruptcy for Billionaires
Byline: Daniel Gross When Bain walks out on its debts, it's business as usual. On Aug. 29, Contec Holdings, a Schenectady, N.Y., company that repairs cable boxes, filed a prepackaged bankruptcy plan--a court-sanctioned deal with lenders in which...
Can't Live with Him, Can't Live without Him
Byline: Peter J. Boyer Clinton will be there for Obama in Charlotte. But the big-tent, business-friendly wing of the party 42 built is long gone. How the death of Clintonism could be a major hurdle for the president this fall. When Bill Clinton...
Cult of Mac
Byline: Nina Strochlic Get ready for the new iPhone. It's that time of year. A chill is coming, and the trees are losing their leaves: it's Apple season. Around the globe, fans of the company's iThings are buzzing about the latest and greatest...
Danger! Exploding Pipelines. Bursting Dams. Massive Blackouts
Byline: David Cay Johnston This is what awaits America in the coming infrastructure crisis. The damage wrought by Hurricane Isaac, coming on the seventh anniversary of the flooding that decimated New Orleans and stunned a nation, serves as a...
Dirty, Easy Money
Byline: Niall Ferguson While the GOP met in Tampa, titans of finance flew to Wyoming. Which mattered more to you last week: the Republican National Convention in Tampa, or the Federal Reserve's annual economic-policy symposium in Jackson Hole,...
GOP Grand Illusions
Byline: Simon Schama Republicans declare war on history. Nice to know, isn't it, that the fate of the Republic might be in the hands of a nominee and his crackerjack team who thought it a great idea to crown the most serious night of their convention...
Lee Child's Badass Hero
Byline: Janice Kaplan The author on Jack Reacher's return and Cruise's new role. Early in author Lee Child's newest thriller, A Wanted Man, hero Jack Reacher stands hitchhiking by the side of the road. A former tough-guy Army cop who has no home...
Meow! Cat's Comeback
Byline: Lauren Streib Chan Marshall, better known as Cat Power, is a musician with a bit of baggage. After an early career filled with well-received albums and an alcohol-fueled, erratic stage presence, she's now 40 and embarking on a new chapter....
My Favorite Mistake: Jeff Probst
Byline: Jeff Probst On becoming a relationship guru. One of my best friends had been in a bad relationship for nearly a decade. He and his girlfriend would show up somewhere, and you'd do the polite thing, which was "So good to see you!" But...
Peter Bourne
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Carter's top drug cop finds Obama's pot policy 'insane.' Dr. Peter Bourne is on a high these days. The self-described "first drug czar"--the first with full control over both the punishment and the treatment sides of federal...
Stop the Presses: No More Sex in Togo
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Party Poopers The summit meeting in Tehran of the Nonaligned Movement--yes, it still exists--was supposed to be Iran's opportunity to cackle at the West. After all, how much of a pariah can a place really be if delegations...
The Endless Orgasm
Byline: Lizzie Crocker It's worse than it sounds. Tabloids on both sides of the Atlantic had a field day last week when The Sun ran a story about a 44-year-old New Jersey woman with a rare condition that causes her to have up to 100 orgasms a...
The Mail
'Winning' Newsweek deserves praise for publishing Buzz Bissinger's defense of Lance Armstrong (Sept. 3). Armstrong has my respect for his strength, tenacity, and the patience to endure the relentless obloquies. Enough was enough! Michael G. Driver,...
The Neil Armstrong You Didn't Know
Byline: Douglas Brinkley The late astronaut's thoughts on Charles Lindbergh, NASA's early days--and his dreams of flying to Mars. I was only 8 years old on July 20, 1969, when Neil Armstrong, 38-year-old commander of Apollo 11, descended the...
The Obamacons, Revisited
In 2008, Barack Obama boasted the support of more than 40 prominent Republicans and conservatives. These "ObamaCons" were offered as a barometer of Obama's crossover appeal, evidence of his ability to unite the nation. But four years later, do the...
The Other Other White Meat
Byline: Jesse Ellison Maine rebrands the lobster. Last week in Rockland, Maine, if you bought a tire from Eastern Tire & Auto Service or got a massage at Synergy Massage & Bodywork, your purchase came with a lobster. Dozens of restaurants...
Warhol, Picasso? Yawn
Byline: Blake Gopnik New geniuses are just waiting to be discovered. For art critics, Groundhog Day now seems to come in September. Looking over this fall's major exhibitions, we see the same big names on offer last year, and the year before...
What Does Anna Want Next?
Byline: Robin Givhan From celeb-filled fundraisers in Manhattan's Greenwich Village to state dinners at the White House, rumors of political aspirations for the 'Vogue' editrix are flying around town. One evening in March, during the last Paris...