Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 17, October 22

Biden Brings the Blarney
Byline: Niall Ferguson What Laughing Uncle Joe doesn't want you to know. The character of Selina Meyer--the fictional vice president in Armando Iannucci's comedy series, Veep--reminds us that Americans usually don't take the job of deputy commander...
Fashion's Full-Figured Failure
Byline: Robin Givhan Don't like your body? Don't blame the models. The spring 2013 runway shows, which finished in Paris this month, were filled with impossibly skinny, extremely young gazelles. So were the fall glossies. Fashion as usual, perhaps--yet...
Han Han
Byline: Duncan Hewitt The enfant terrible of Chinese letters finds foes, not friends. The world's most widely read blogger is sitting--largely unrecognized--in a small Shanghai cafe, explaining his accidental career. "I didn't particularly want...
Just How Many Facebook Friends Do You Need?
Byline: Robin Marantz Henig With Samantha Henig Twenty-somethings spend hours each day keeping their social networks going. But a thousand BFFs just may be a few hundred too many. The torture of modern friendship. Ask a group of elderly people...
Justice in Brazil. and Tripoli?
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Trial and Error Libya and the International Criminal Court are locked in an acrid tug of war over the right to try Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of the late Muammar, for crimes against humanity. The Libyans, not surprisingly,...
Lazarus Rises in Missouri
Byline: Peter J. Boyer Todd Akin was left for dead. He could win--and change the Senate. Of those lonely souls deemed untouchable in polite political circles, the persona non grata of the year has to be Rep. Todd Akin, the Republican candidate...
Lincoln Plays to Win
Byline: Sidney Blumenthal Some consider politics a dirty word. But the 16th president was a master of political ruthlessness for the sake of the highest ideals. The latest Lincoln boom--kicking off with the bicentennial of his birth in 2009 and...
Losing Their Religion
Byline: David Sessions The GOP's secularism problem. There's been much angst on the right over the Republican Party's growing demographic problems, most memorably by GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham, who said the party was running out of "angry white...
Making Alabama Shakes
Byline: Lauren Streib The lightning-fast rise of a soul-slinging Southern band. Between floor-thumping beats and crowd-pleasing choruses, Brittany Howard can't seem to get used to the 3,000 fans stacked along the stage and pressed against the...
My Digital Wedding
Byline: Brian Ries I tweet, I pin, I do. I asked my girlfriend to marry me on a boat on the wide expanse of Lake George. There was no iPhone to capture the moment, no Twitter to tweet or Facebook to share, and, back at our campsite, no AT&T...
My Favorite Mistake: Dwyane Wade
Byline: Dwyane Wade The Miami Heat guard on the phone call that changed his life. "I got something to tell you." I was 19 years old and in Florence, Italy, playing for a traveling team, when I got the call. It was my girlfriend. I said, "You're...
Picasso's Naked Truth
Byline: Blake Gopnik Why he showed us the world in black and white. The new exhibition called Picasso Black and White, filling Frank Lloyd Wright's great rotunda at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, ought to be called Picasso in Sepia. That's...
The Great Deformer
Ronald Reagan's budget director David Stockman takes a scalpel to Romney's claims as a job creator Bain Capital is a product of the Great Deformation. It has garnered fabulous winnings through leveraged speculation in financial markets that have...
The Mail
'My Proof of Heaven' I found Dr. Eben Alexander's journey in consciousness (Oct. 15) thrilling. It confirmed what saints and sages, East and West, have been telling us for centuries: that the reality of heaven exists within us and that infinite...
The Repentant Radical
Byline: Christopher Dickey A former extremist warns of a resurgent al-Qaeda. But who is this man, Maajid Nawaz? The rag that the guards tied around his eyes stank of the fear and the sweat of other prisoners, and when the Egyptian secret police...
Tombstone Tourism
Byline: Malcolm Jones A second life for cemeteries. A Gravediggers' Ball in Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery. Pumpkin carving in the Sleepy Hollow graveyard. Open-air movies in a Los Angeles cemetery. Is this any way to honor the dead? If...