Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 18, October 29

A Turn of the Page
Byline: Tina Brown Newsweek embraces the digital future. This is a bittersweet moment in Newsweek's immensely proud history. As we have announced--and as has been widely and passionately reported by the media in the U.S. and abroad--the magazine...
Dinesh D'souza
Byline: David Sessions The rise and fall of a right-wing star. Long before he resigned the presidency of The King's College, a small evangelical school in Manhattan, over his engagement to a 29-year-old woman while still married to his wife of...
Does 'Cloud Atlas' Soar?
Byline: David Ansen A megawatt cast attempts to bring the book to life. David Mitchell's astonishing 2004 novel, Cloud Atlas, is one of the great high-wire acts of contemporary fiction. This wildly ambitious page-turner spins six separate tales...
High Times in America
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Pot use in the United States is rising sharply, and voters may make it fully legal in two states this fall. Smart businessmen are banking on that happening. Full dark in downtown Denver, and inside one of the twinkling high-rises...
Iran's Cash: Going, Going-Gone?
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Kinship in Kinshasa? What better place to take froideur to great new heights than the summit of the International Organization of La Francophonie, a jamboree at which heads of state of French-speaking nations gather...
It's (Almost) Morning in America
Byline: Michael Tomasky A surging economy is great news. Especially for the next president. The day after last Tuesday's debate, as I was monitoring the Twitter feed for the post-debate debate, some news flashed across the screen that elicited...
Leaner and Greener
Byline: Ian Yarett Newsweek's annual rankings reveal the planet's biggest protectors--and polluters. Four years ago, it seemed every politician was hot and bothered about climate change--whether they believed it was real or not. But in 2012,...
Meet the New Boss
Byline: Dan Gross Citi's colorful cast of CEO characters. Showman, Lawyer, quant, jock. No, it's not the next novel by John le Carre, author of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Rather, it's the intrigue-filled succession of chief executive officers...
Miami's Bloody Streets
Byline: Michael Moynihan Race, art, and crime seethe in Tom Wolfe's new novel. Fourteen years ago, journalist Michael Lewis, reviewing Tom Wolfe's second novel, A Man in Full, noted the author's age and fretted, "My God, this one could be his...
Mistressville
Byline: Mark Ellwood Shanghai's raciest neighborhood. Ambitious and energetic, Shanghai more than merits the nickname Shang Kong. But the mainland city is co-opting more than just the colonial hub's commercial savvy. Businessmen here are aping...
My Favorite Mistake: Connie Britton
Byline: Connie Britton The 'Nashville' star on getting yelled at by Ed Asner. Once I decided to be an actor, I spent a summer working at the Cleveland Play House as a PA on a production of Born Yesterday with Ed Asner and Madeline Kahn. Now,...
Poppin' Bottles
Byline: Sujay Kumar Party like the major leagues. San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum can dodge a line drive, but the two-time Cy Young winner was no match for a cork that nailed him in the face in a postgame celebration caught on television....
The Girl Who Changed Pakistan
Byline: Shehrbano Taseer Shehrbano Taseer, whose father was killed by the Taliban, takes an insider's look at the 15-year-old girl who may finally turn the tide on extremism. The teenage girls chatted to each other and their teachers as the school...
The President Who Would Be King
Byline: Andrew Romano and Daniel Klaidman The Obama power play that could forever change the way Washington works. Obama was gripping the telephone so tightly that it looked as if he were about to pulverize it in the palm of his hand. Back...
The Truth Behind the Benghazi Attack
Byline: Jamie Dettmer, Christopher Dickey, And Eli Lake The blow-by-blow of the killing of Ambassador Stevens. Diplomatic Security special agent David Ubben waits silently, his M-4 assault rifle at the ready as he hides deep in the dark inside...
The Wobbly Star
Byline: Lawrence Krauss Why we keep finding new planets. I don't know which I find more remarkable, the fact that there appears to be a small rocky, Earth-mass planet orbiting the closest star to our sun, or the fact that astronomers were able...
'This Isn't All about Me, Is It?'
Byline: Lee Siegel Broadway keeps pulling Pacino back in. "I love the idea of risk," Al Pacino says. "What I don't like is suicide." A few days later, he tells me a story about taking the first great risk of his film career, the scene in The...
Washington War Games
Byline: Niall Ferguson Which strategy will prevail on the electoral battlefield? Which matters more: air power or boots on the ground? It's the kind of debate you hear a lot among military men and armchair strategists, arguing (these days) about...
What Makes Taylor Tick
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh With the release of her fourth album, 'Red,' 22-year-old Swift sounds off on love and feminism. Does it weird you out that I'm a 30-year-old guy who likes your music? No, that makes me incredibly happy! Aren't your...