Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 01, January 4

12 Stories to Watch in 2013
From India to a[umlaut]Lebanon to Hollywood, a[umlaut]our writers and a[umlaut]editors name the stories you're likely a[umlaut]to be hearing a[umlaut]about THIS year. 1 women's rights in india BY TUNKU VARADARAJAN "Spring" is a metaphor...
2012's Worst Scams
Byline: Christopher Elliot Last year people lost billions to identity theft and deceptive debt collection. for one California retiree, the worst scam of the year was the one that cost her $30,000--extracted payment by payment from fraudsters...
A Load of Gas
Matt Damon has energy companies and their friends scrambling for cover. Three years ago, the oil and gas industry was caught off guard by the documentary Gasland, made by Josh Fox, an activist and theater director who had been offered nearly $100,000...
A Trigger for Talk
Byline: Kristin A. Goss Public opinion on gun control is as polarized as it has ever been. And our policy won't change until we--family, friends, neighbors--engage in thousands of intimate conversations. Whenever America suffers a mass public...
A Winter's Tale
The most anticipated new reads of the new year. You can put aside all those best-of-2012 lists, because you're not going to ever get to any of them. Instead, as winter draws us in and keeps us home--or (if we're lucky) on the beach--give it a fresh...
Commies Prefer Blondes
Byline: Michael Moynihan Decoding the FBI's paranoia about Marilyn Monroe's politics. National Notebook: Shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian President Boris Yeltsin allowed a small number of academics to poke around in the...
Eunuchs of the Universe
As America teeters on a cliff, Tom Wolfe draws up a searing indictment of our unscrupulous financial culture. Come join us as we go back seven months to the apex of the history of American capitalism in the 21st century. We find ourselves in a swarm...
Ferocious Feroz
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Afghanistan's first female rapper refuses to be silenced. a[umlaut] a[umlaut] "listen to my voice/It's not just your choice," raps Susan Feroz on her new track "Naqisul Aqal," an Islamic term that means "mentally...
Flinching from a[euro][umlaut]Suicide
Byline: David Frum The fiscal-cliff compromise doesn't solve any of our real problems. We've been warned for years about a coming American debt crisis: a day when markets and creditors would force the United States to raise taxes and cut spending...
India's Shame
Byline: Dilip d'Souza A horrific rape is, sadly, unlikely to end the a[umlaut]everyday outrages against women. there is no aspect of this sad, sordid episode that does not grate. Not even what happened after her death. She was gang-raped on a...
Me and a Gun
Byline: Paul Begala Why most gun owners support tougher controls. A hunting buddy of mine emailed me from the waiting room of his doctor's office in Columbus, Ga., a few days after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School. He was cringing...
News Gallery: A Selection of Images from This Week in News
jan. 2, 2013 Damara, Central African Republic Guns and Poses a convoy of troops from Chad rolled into a city 44 miles from the Central African Republic capital of Bangui in an effort to stop the steady advancement of the rebel Seleka Coalition....
Person of Interest: Bill Browder
Byline: Eli Lake The man who provoked Russia's American-adoption ban. Last month, when Vladimir Putin signed a law banning American citizens from adopting Russian children, it was widely seen as the latest indication that U.S.-Russian relations...
The Ballroom Dancer and the KGB
Byline: Peter Pomerantsev In 2006, a Russian exile and former spy was poisoned to death in London. His dogged widow blames Vladimir Putin--and is suing for justice. "My husband was murdered. I think the order came from Putin. And I want justice,"...
The City: Chongqing, China
Byline: Hong Ying Hong Ying on sweet dreams in a place of suffering. I was born in the year of China's Great Famine and grew up in a slum on the south bank of the Yangtze River in Chongqing. It was a place crowded with small wooden hovels, rotten...
'This Brother Needs Help'
Byline: Marlow Stern Tavis Smiley sounds off on Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained' and how it flubs the history of American slavery. the author and host of the Tavis Smiley show discusses filmmaker Quentin Tarantino's treatment of black culture...
Too Big A[euro][umlaut]to Jail?
Byline: Dan Gross Why the biggest banks are a[umlaut]getting off easy. the banks are on the run. Wall Street went all out on a Romney victory--and lost. Elizabeth Warren, perhaps the fiercest critic of banks in public life, is about to assume...