Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 02, January 11

A History Written in Blood
1990 Paul Kagame leads the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), a group of Rwandan exiles--primarily Tutsis--in an invasion of their native country, setting off a civil war. 1994 A plane carrying the president of Rwanda, Juvenal Habyarimana, is...
A Selection of Images from This Week in News
Jan. 9, 2013 SuphanBuri, Thailand Fire in the Sky with a soft yellow glow, paper lanterns drift skyward, powered by the heat of solitary flames. Every year, monks wearing dark red robes release lanterns into the sky in a ceremony to honor...
Bonfire of the Verities
Byline: Michael Gross Manhattan's fabled 'good buildings' are no longer its best buildings. after shlomo Ben-Haim, an Israeli scientist-entrepreneur, made millions selling a medical-device company he'd founded with his brother, a London-based...
Clean or Green?
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Why to be cautious about medical recycling. the u.s. centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently launched the One and Only Campaign, an endeavor aimed not--as the name might suggest--at promoting marital monogamy,...
Colm Toibin's Dublin
Byline: Henry C. Krempels The novelist on the literary city of Wilde and Joyce. Colm Toibin spends much of his time lying down, on a sofa, in the back room of his four-story Georgian house in Dublin, reading. The rest of his time is either spent...
Dollar Princesses
Byline: Daisy Goodwin The American heiresses who inspired 'Downton Abbey.' the third season of Downtona[umlaut]Abbey is back on our screens, and the series introduces a new character, the American mother of Lady Grantham, played to eye-popping...
Don't Give Up on Piloted Dives
Byline: James Cameron The quickest way to destroy ocean science, James Cameron tells Newsweek, is to take human explorers out of the water. I know Bob Ballard well and continue to admire and support his efforts. But here's the problem with his...
Dreamliner's Nightmare
Byline: Clive Irving Boeing's new plane has airlines in a spin. before the alarming emergency in Boston involving Boeing's 787 Dreamliner catching fire lies one far scarier moment--the closest call any jet can have. In November 2010, after a...
Dysfunction a[euro][umlaut]Junction
Byline: paul begala a[umlaut]Why the GOP resembles a failed state. The Beltway Republicans need to call Kofi Annan. The former U.N. chief has of late been specializing in trying to salvage failed states. And a failed state is what the GOP has...
Esther Duflo
Byline: Daniel Gross Obama taps poverty's 'rock star.' in the first week of January, most of America's best-known economists were in San Diego, thronging the American Economic Association's annual meeting at the Manchester Grand Hyatt resort....
Kanye and Kim Take America
Byline: Michael C. Moynihan Delving into the mysteries of the Kardashians. n New Year's Eve, Kanye West interrupted his Atlantic a[umlaut]City concert to announce an urgent bit of news. "Stop the music," West demanded. "Can we make some noise...
Labor Pains
Byline: Rosemary Righter Will China ever reform its prison camps? on jan. 7, Meng Jianzhu, the recently appointed head of the Communist Party's Central Politics and Law Commission, made a historic announcement. He informed a legal conference...
Paul Kagame, War Criminal?
Byline: Howard W. French Why the celebrated Rwanda president really derserves an indictment. when rwandan-backed rebels recently took Goma, the biggest city in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Paul Kagame had every reason...
Planets, Planets a[euro][umlaut]Everywhere
Byline: Michio Kaku And 17 billion are the size of Earth. tonight, after reading this article, you will never see the starry night sky in the same way again. Gazing at the splendor of the Milky Way galaxy, you will ask yourself, "Is anyone looking...
Showbiz Showdown
Byline: Mac Margolis A war of words between their president and their a[umlaut]biggest screen idol has mesmerized Argentines. life hasn't been easy lately for Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner. After winning the election with...
Spy vs. Spy
Byline: Tara McKelvey The coolest gadgets, the stealthiest agents, and more country-by-country comparisons from the world of espionage. This week, President Obama nominated John Brennan, currently his counterterrorism adviser, to run the CIA....
Sundance 13 for '13
Byline: Marlow Stern Check out these don't-miss flicks debuting at Park City's annual festival. Ain't Them Bodies Saints Ain't them bodies saints Marking the feature directorial debut of David Lowery, Ain't Them Bodies Saints follows Bob...
The City: Delhi, MMonster Metropolis
Byline: William Dalrymple delhi has been in the news for all the wrong reasons of late. The horrific gang rape and subsequent death of a young woman on her way back from seeing Life of Pi has lifted the lid on the casual violence of the Indian capital....
The Last Dive
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Funding for human expeditions to the watery depths appears to have run aground. As legendary explorer Sylvia Earle says goodbye to the ocean floor, are machines good enough to take her place? The fall ends with a thud, our...
The Logic of Hagel
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Why obama wanted an a[umlaut]improbable fellow traveler at the pentagon. IN the lingo of Capitol Hill they're known as "codels." Members of Congress go on congressional delegations to war zones and foreign capitals to...
Wish You Were Here
Byline: michelle cottle On Nixon's 100th, a[umlaut]Republican faithful party like it's 1972. this is what nostalgia looks like: It's Jan. 9, and the Grand Ballroom of Washington's storied Mayflower hotel has been decked out for the Richard Nixon...
Youth in Revolt
Byline: Gordon Brown Why protests in India and Pakistan herald a trend. The new year has begun--just as 2012 ended--with young people on the march. Literally. This week it is young Indians, shocked by the murder of a medical student, who dominate...