Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 22, December 3

Bite Me
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Our best weapon in the fight against bedbugs might be a pill. Man's inept struggle against that tiny and most annoying of all pests, the bedbug, took a turn for the better this month with a report of a clever new way to...
Bone Appetit
Byline: Alexandra Peers; Alexandra Peers writes on food and culture in New York. The peculiar appeal of a delicious new trend. The food industry's latest fad keeps Peter Molinari busy in the basement with a huge, buzzing band saw, cross-cutting...
Denialists, Whiners, and Wackjobs
Byline: Paul Begala There's more than one way to be a Republican. I used to think Republicans were a monochromatic monolith specializing in Group Think, though without the Think part. The Republicans' reaction to the reelection of Barack Obama,...
Dolce & Gabbana, Exposed
Byline: Robin Givhan The designers pick up the camera for their spring campaign. There are arguably no other designers today who are as closely associated with a singular cultural tradition as Stefano Gabbana and Domenico Dolce. Ever since they...
Everyday Armageddon
Byline: David Cay Johnston Disaster far greater than Sandy looms--unless we move fast to fix a badly broken system. The politically ambitious governors of New York and New Jersey just might secure their parties' presidential nominations in 2016,...
Israel's Fatal Game
Byline: Peter Beinart Bombing Hamas won't stop the violence. Why Washington and Jerusalem desperately need a new strategy. The first thing to understand about the war that recently broke out in Israel and the Gaza Strip is that Hamas forced...
My Dinner with Jennifer
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Getting candid with Hollywood's new queen of comedy. On the big screen, Jennifer Lawrence is as tough as they come. But meet her for dinner, and you'll quickly learn the truth--she's a lightweight. After a single glass...
My Favorite Mistake: Ang Lee
Byline: Interview by Marlow Stern The 'Life of Pi' director on his greatest balancing act. Many times when you make a movie, it feels like your biggest mistake. But even if a film isn't a hit, you shouldn't view it as a mistake. My mistake is...
National Book Award Winner: Katherine Boo
Byline: Lucas Wittmann A descent into the Mumbai slums climbs to literary heights. The whole story is improbable: a blonde American woman heads off to one of India's direst slums. Sure, she's a staff writer for The New Yorker, and she's spent...
R.I.P., Twinkies
Byline: Daniel Gross What really did in America's favorite guilty pleasure. National Notebook: For anyone who remembers the days before schoolkids ate free-range chicken wraps and kale chips, reading the news Hostess Brands posted on its website...
Showdown at the Fiscal Cliff
Byline: David Frum; David Frum is the author of the Newsweek eBook Why Romney Lost (And What the GOP Can Do About It). In his standoff with the GOP, the president's packing heat. Nobody sings the song of cooperation more sweetly than President...
The Fall of a General
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Gail Sheehy; With reporting by John Barry, Christopher Dickey, Jesse Ellison, and Eli Lake. David Petraeus subdued Iraq, steered the course for exit in Afghanistan, and is one of the most decorated generals of his generation....
The Psycho of Hollywood
Byline: Sam Tanenhaus Director Alfred Hitchcock gulped martinis, treated actors like cattle, and lusted after his leading ladies. Will a new film starring Anthony Hopkins reveal the man behind the movies? To say he's making a comeback would...
The Science of Heaven
Byline: Dr. Eben Alexander Can consciousness exist when the body fails? One neurosurgeon says he has seen it firsthand--and takes on critics who vehemently disagree. at around five o'clock on the morning of Nov. 10, 2008, I awoke with the early...
The Story of Joe
Byline: Abby Haglage He stars in the epic film 'Lincoln,' but Joseph Gordon-Levitt has a passion for tales that are equally as ambitious--though a little bit shorter. You're releasing another book, The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories Vol. 2, from your...
Women in Miters
Byline: David Sessions England votes on Female bishops. The Church of England's governing body is likely to approve legislation that, after more than a decade of debate, will allow women to become bishops. But while church disputes--whether the...
World on a Page
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan; With Luke Darby and Jane Teeling An Extreme Egyptian Pyramid Scheme Francois Reagan' France has proved once more that when it comes to addressing the increasingly complex and baffling "Arab Spring," it is the uncontested...