Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 04, January 25

App-Rica
Byline: Jake Bright Kenya's mobile-phone revolution. During a 2011 mobile-finances presentation at a major American bank, I noticed one of the bankers, an African immigrant, chuckling. U.S. tech vendors described "cutting-edge" mobile applications...
Courtside Coquettes
Byline: Lizzie Crocker From Gussie to Venus, tennis fashion has always set tongues wagging. It was the gasp heard 'round the world. Tennis starlet Gertrude "Gorgeous Gussie" Moran, who died on Jan. 16 at age 89, shocked Wimbledon officials in...
Don't Tell Mark
Byline: Sam Schlinkert The man behind Google Maps and the Facebook search engine on the pleasure of not knowing his way. You may not know who Lars Rasmussen is. But chances are, more than once he helped get you where you were going. That's because...
Eat Your Sildenafil
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Is Viagra the new weight-loss pill? The history of medicine is full of discoveries that scientists then play with, willy nilly, to see if they might have an application elsewhere. Such is the case with sildenafil,...
Fight Knights
Byline: Mark Ellwood Welcome to the world of chess boxing. It's 1992 , the death throes of the Cold War. French artist Enki Bilal publishes the last installment of his epic graphic novel,The Nikopol Trilogy. It depicts the bleakness of life in...
Gaddafiphilia
Byline: Fouad Ajami A perverse nostalgia takes hold in the West. We were bound to come to it: a lament for the fall of Gaddafi. Mali had come apart, and there were "strategic analysts" bemoaning the demise of the Libyan dictatorship. Thousands...
Gaga over Gay
Byline: Paul Begala But will he deliver? When Martin Luther King Jr. spoke to the March on Washington in 1963, he used an interesting metaphor. He called "the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence ... a promissory...
Gun Laws and the Fools of Chelm*
Byline: David Mamet The individual is not only best qualified to provide his own personal defense, he is the only one qualified to do so. * A town in eastern Poland. Karl Marx summed up Communism as "from each according to his ability, to...
India's Princeling
Byline: Swapan Dasgupta A 'part-time politician' promises change. Is he for real? Whenever the government in Delhi is confronted with a crisis--and these have been bimonthly affairs ever since the showpiece Commonwealth Games of 2010 became...
Jeffrey H. Smith
Byline: Eli Lake Legal counsel to Zero Dark Thirty. In recent months, Mark Boal, author of the screenplay for Zero Dark Thirty, has had a very Washington kind of problem: the script he wrote keeps drawing seemingly hostile scrutiny from Capitol...
L. Ron Hubbard's Secret Self
Newly discovered tall tales from the scientology founder's favorite club Here's the story you know, if you know one at all, about L. Ron Hubbard. He was the messiah-scribe of Scientology, "the source" who revealed the religion, founded the church,...
Manila, Magnet for the Hopeful
Byline: Miguel Syjuco There's a multitude of Manilas: the past, present, and imagined future. Layers unpeel to reveal a city that is pungent, astringent, lachrymose, sweet, delicious. At its core, the Manila of memory: On the Pasig River, where...
Smash That Crystal Ball
Byline: David Frum The next president could come out of nowhere. Marco Rubio or Hillary Clinton? Paul Ryan or Joe Biden? You weren't a pundit in good standing unless you broke into last weekend's ceremonials to speculate on who might be taking...
Steamy Sundance
Byline: Marlow Stern Park City's 2013 festival sizzled with sex, sex, and more sex. This year's edition of the Sundance Film Festival, the premier showcase for independent cinema, marked a major departure from festivals past. In a watershed...
The Dashed Revolution
Byline: Vivian Salama Two years later, disillusionment has replaced hope in the Middle East. Ismail Ahmed passes much of the day sitting on a small wooden chair outside his grocery-cum-souvenir shop in Giza, on the outskirts of Cairo, watching...
The Economics of Extinction
Byline: Margot Kiser How long before Africa's rhinos and elephants are wiped out in the wild? You wouldn't think a room as big as a warehouse could feel this airless-- not even a maximum-security warehouse, like this one. At the same time, the...
Yours Ever, Plum
Byline: Christopher Buckley The letters--and life--of P.G. Wodehouse. I visited Christopher Hitchens in the hospital just after he'd been given a diagnosis of mortal illness. By his bed I noticed a dog-eared Jeeves and Wooster paperback. Christopher...