Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 05, February 1

Animal Planet
Byline: Michio Kaku An Iranian monkey follows the flight path of a Soviet dog. The world was caught off guard when the Iranians announced that they had successfully shot a monkey 72 miles into space. With justification, some analysts claimed...
Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey Feeding Africa In ferocious cycles worthy of the Old Testament, Africa continues to face years of plenty and years of famine. But over the past decade economist Eleni Gabre-Madhin has worked to solve that problem in...
A Voice Raised in Joy
Byline: Tracy McNicoll How singer Fatoumata Diawara fought back against the Islamists overrunning Mali. swaddled in a tendril of vivid scarves, like fireworks about her face, Fatoumata Diawara nurses an espresso in a corner banquette, all infectious...
Barbarism at the Bolshoi
Byline: Anna Nemtsova After he was attacked with acid, the artistic director talks of a 'war.' Russian history books are thick with sinister plots and assassination attempts. But the acid attack on the artistic director of the Bolshoi Ballet...
Dan Pfeiffer
Byline: Michelle Cottle A messaging guru with a competitive streak. In a town of shameless self-promoters, President Obama's newest senior adviser might strike some as bizarrely low profile. Dan Pfeiffer, until recently the White House communications...
El Hombre Republicano
Byline: Paul Begala He's Rubio, not Ryan. The most troubling deficit the Republican Party has is not technological or even demographic; it is a deficit of new ideas. Thus, it is never too early to begin the Ideas Primary, and Marco Rubio has...
Fifty Shades of Rooney
Byline: Marlow Stern In Hollywood--land of a million pretty young things--Rooney Mara has directors lining up to capture her icy demeanor and her inner fire. I'm interested in the duality of people," says Rooney Mara, of her predilection for...
French Fries for the Soul
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Why economic recessions make us fat. It Has long been known that high-calorie food can act as a balm for anxiety and bad moods, but now a series of new studies published in Psychological Science suggests that high-calorie...
Hawk with a Heart
Byline: Daniel Klaidman John Brennan, the most misunderstood man in Washington. John Brennan, the president's counterterrorism chief and now his nominee to head the CIA, has spent his career in the darkest corners of the terror wars--and he...
Hillary
Byline: Michael Tomasky First lady, senator, secretary of state. How she became the most important woman in U.S. political history. And now, as of this week, Hillary Rodham Clinton becomes something she has not been in two decades: a private...
How the French Freed Timbuktu
Byline: Trevor Snapp Militant Islamists flee after months of brutal rule. It's the dry season in Mali's remote northern deserts, yet the sky spits unceasing rain down on the French military convoy, turning sand into sheets of mud as slick as...
Israel's 'Gatekeepers'
Byline: Dan Ephron Six Shin Bet chiefs air their views on peace with Palestine. In the hierarchy of Israeli intelligence agencies, the Shin Bet is the equivalent of the blue-collar worker. While Mossad handles the dazzling overseas operations--abducting...
Knotty Boys
Byline: Michael C. Moynihan The Scouts finally earn their tolerance badge. Last July the Boy Scouts of America reaffirmed its longstanding policy of excluding gays from being Scouts or Scout leaders, arguing that the prohibition was still "in...
London: A River Runs through It
Byline: Francesca Segal In economic terms as well as geographic, London's black and beating heart has always been the River Thames, viscous with centuries of filth and secrets. Eventually, the Victorians laced the city with underground drains to...
The $55,000 Backpack
Byline: Isabel Wilkinson L.A.'s coolest new boutique rolls out art-world collaborations, starting with Damien Hirst. During the couture shows in Paris in January, the runways featured feminine dresses by Raf Simons for Christian Dior and Karl...
The Woman Behind the Mob
Byline: Beatrice Borromeo Forget 'The Godfather.' The real-life story of how a daughter inherits a kingdom of drugs, guns, and money. Arisa Merico was 22 when she took over as the boss of a powerful Italian mafia clan. Her father had just been...
Welcome to Botswana
Byline: David Frum It's in the Midwest. It's called Illinois. It's official: Illinois is the worst-governed state in the country. Last week Standard & Poor's downgraded Illinois's credit rating to A-. Only California bears so low a rating,...
Who's a Jew?
Byline: Fania Oz-Salzberger Israeli novelist Amos Oz and his daughter define Jewishness today. My father, Amos Oz, the renowned Israeli novelist, and I, a historian of ideas, recently published our first coauthored book, Jews and Words. It is...