Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 09, March 1

Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey Judge Drone Even staunch supporters of the Obama administration's tactics fighting terrorism are more than a little uneasy about the president appointing himself judge, jury, and executioner. Even if you trust Obama,...
Art, on Island Time
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula How long before a Bahamas Biennale? It would be easy to revel in the Dionysian pleasures the Bahamas have on offer (conch fritters and rum concoctions are only a few), but as the commonwealth enters its 40th year of independence...
Barack's Blunder
Byline: Paul Begala 'I'll take John Boehner at his word.' When Barack Obama was running for president, Greg Craig, one of his strongest supporters (later his White House counsel), described the candidate's philosophy of dealing with Republicans....
'Bute' and the Beast
Byline: Vickery Eckhoff What's in your horse burger? The French take few tips from the British, but French Agriculture Minister Stephane Le Foll made an exception recently when addressing reporters at the Paris farm show. "One would have to...
Carnival of the Soul
Byline: Tahir Shah Join the swarm at the largest religious gathering in human history. It's the noise that hits you first. A penetrating, jarring frenzy of raw sound, conjured from a million whispers, muffled prayers, and heartfelt cries....
Che Casino!
Byline: Barbie Latza Nadeau (That's Italian for 'what a mess!') Italy, one of the most consequential countries in Europe, has been reduced to political rubble after a divided population made a spectacularly contrarian decision in last weekend's...
France's Courtesan Couture
Byline: Rebecca Benhamou Zahia Dehar has peddled her tabloid scandal into a fashion fairy tale. As the woman at the center of one of the most high-profile sex scandals ever to hit French sports, Zahia Dehar has become the ultimate tabloid sensation....
From Iran with Love
Byline: Brad Gooch A selection of poems excerpted from 'Faces of Love: Hafez and the Poets of Shiraz.' My love's for pretty faces, For heart-bewitching hair; I'm crazy for good wine, A languorous, drunk stare ... In love there's no escaping...
Godzilla versus Mothra
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Scientists enlist viruses to fight cancer. Medical research typically is a cautious, restrained affair--but every once in a while, scientists try out a radical idea. Take this one for example: injecting a live virus into...
Hoop Dreams
Byline: Sarah M. Kazadi Two athletes bring their talent from Congo to the American court. From a distance, she looks like a walking tower. Her slim, six-foot-four frame casts a shadow twice as large, moving in giant strides under a scorching...
Killer Election
Byline: Laura Heaton Kenyans are charged up, armed--and ready to vote. Green and blue strobe lights cut through a smoke-filled room in the YMCA office building turned music-video recording studio in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi in February....
Mike Duggan
Byline: Jay Scott Smith A white candidate for (gasp!) Detroit. This week in front of more than 500 supporters--and after months of dodging questions about whether he would run--Mike Duggan announced his candidacy for mayor of Detroit. A former...
Moonstruck
Byline: Rob Verger Got a great name for Pluto's satellites? Pity poor Pluto. Once considered to be a full-fledged member of the planet club, it was officially relabeled as a dwarf planet in 2006. But it is, nonetheless, a fascinating celestial...
Sao Paulo, Lovely If You Close One Eye
Byline: Antonio Xerxenesky A friend once said, when I decided to move from Porto Alegre to Sao Paulo a year ago, "Sao Paulo is not for amateurs." And the metropolis does seem scary from above: an urban landscape that spreads for miles and miles,...
Sellout U?
Byline: Anya Kamenetz Leave the tuition on the dresser. Sometime next week, New York University's president, John Sexton, will face a no-confidence vote by his faculty. The affable Sexton has led an ambitious expansion campaign during his 11...
The IMAX Solution
Byline: Daniel Gross A 'giant' way to save movies. Americans are losing the taste for going to the movies. According to the Motion Picture Association of America, movie admissions in the U.S. and Canada dropped 18 percent between 2002 and 2011....
The Tragedy of John Allen
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Did a fine general really deserve such public humiliation? Sometime this winter, sitting in his hooch in Afghanistan, Marine Gen. John Allen was reduced to calculating the simple, inescapable math of wartime separation....