Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 10, March 8

A Prayer for My Church
Byline: Paul Begala It may take a miracle to fix the Vatican. As the College of Cardinals meets in a secret conclave to select the next pope, thoughtful Catholics are asking why Roger Mahony, the disgraced cardinal-archbishop of Los Angeles,...
Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey The Missing Middle The notion that entrepreneurs will somehow salvage the economies of crumbling countries has gained a lot of intellectual currency in recent years, not least because governments have failed so miserably....
As Twisted as Spaghetti
Byline: Tim Parks Italy's politics are in complete chaos, as a comedian grapples with Silvio Berlusconi for control. Imagine you need to get to the other side of a busy street in Milan. You go to the pedestrian crossing provided. Cars are obliged...
Bangladesh's Unfinished War
Byline: Text by K. Anis Ahmedl A Muslim country fights to remain secular. A campaign of violence by Bangladesh's main Islamist party, Jamaat-e-Islami, has left 74 people dead since February 28. They are protesting the death sentence handed down...
Before He Was Churchill
Byline: Geoffrey Wheatcroft The trials and triumphs of the future icon. When Winston Churchill entered Parliament following the 1900 general election, he was 26, and already famous. He had reported on or served in no fewer than four bloody conflicts,...
Cardinal Sin
Byline: Jason Berry Father Maciel and the popes he stained. Marcial Maciel Degollado, a priest from Mexico with an extravagant name, was the greatest fundraiser for the postwar Catholic Church and equally its greatest criminal. "A life ......
Egypt's 'Daily Show'
Byline: Mike Giglio Bassem Youssef takes on the Salafis with American-style satire. Two blocks from Tahrir Square, hidden amid the chaos and faded buildings of downtown Cairo, Bassem Youssef's studio projects the optimism of an earlier age. It's...
El Comandante
Byline: Boris Munoz Nationalist, populist, charlatan, provocateur. Hugo Chavez polarized Venezuela--and the world. As 2012 drew to a close, Commander Hugo Chavez boarded an A-319 Airbus and, standing at top of the stairs, waved goodbye to his...
Gone Girl
Byline: Jace Lacob Inside 'Top of the Lake,' Jane Campion's gritty new thriller. Jane Campion is missing. The Oscar-nominated director of such films as The Piano and Bright Star is in Los Angeles for a quick stop before the Sundance Film Festival,...
How to Get Ahead on Facebook without Really Trying
Byline: Megan McArdle There's no mystery to how to make the social-networking site work for you. You don't need a lot of friends. You just need a lot of cash. Not long ago, I decided that it was time to finally get serious about my social-media...
If the South Hadn't Seceded
Byline: R.B. Bernstein A historical what-if with lessons for today. Americans are watching, with frustration and resentment, the politics of obstruction convulsing the nation's capital. Since the inauguration of President Obama in 2009, congressional...
Leaning Out
Byline: Mary Louise Kelly My son needed me, and I was in Baghdad. I suspect that for every woman who's ever tried to balance work and family, there comes a day when you hit the wall. I don't mean your run-of-the-mill bad day, when the baby barfs...
Mystery Man
Byline: David Frum After 100 years, why are we still so confused by Woodrow Wilson? One hundred years ago this week, Woodrow Wilson took the oath of office, and still, after all this time, Americans cannot make up their minds about him. Wilson...
Nigel Farage
Byline: Peter Jukes Europhobia as a full-time job. It was one of the most memorable images of the last election. On the morning the polls opened in 2010, Nigel Farage, a British member of the European Parliament, was photographed in the wreckage...
Nottingham, Underground Town
Byline: Alison Moore There are hundreds of caves beneath Nottingham, cut into the sandstone over the centuries by the city's inhabitants. Some were cold, damp homes for the poor; some were extra rooms under medieval houses--a way of adding an extension...
On Shaky Ground
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Sometimes nature reminds us who is in charge. Jeff Bush, a resident of Tampa, met a chilling fate the night of February 28, when he was swallowed up by a giant sinkhole. The suddenness and randomness of the event, as well...
Pristine Sistine
Byline: Barbie Latza Nadeau Visitors to Michelangelo's masterpiece get a spiritual cleansing. When Michelangelo started painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling in 1508, he knew well the chapel's importance as the seat of papal conclaves, but he likely...
Syria's Cycle of Retribution
Byline: Janine di Giovanni When nonviolent revolutions spin into bloodshed. Srdja Popovic goes around the world teaching nonviolent techniques to activists to overthrow autocrats. Whenever he talks about the Arab Spring, he says: "2011 was the...
The Myth of Bob Woodward
Byline: Max Holland Why is this man an American icon? For the past week Washington has found itself debating Bob Woodward. The occasion: his very public argument with White House senior official Gene Sperling, in which Woodward left the impression...
Visit Beautiful Haiti?
Byline: Rashmee Roshan Lall An industrious tourism tsar makes a very hard sell. "It's a package," says Haiti's glamorous young tourism minister, Stephanie B. Villedrouin, good-naturedly referring to the undeniable and politically incorrect truth...