Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 19, November 5

Argentina's Susana Trimarco: One Mother's Fight against Human Trafficking
Byline: Scott Johnson Susana Trimarco's quest to find her kidnapped daughter has uncovered the dark underbelly of Argentina's sex trade. Susana Trimarco has so many questions, but they all return her to the same sorrowful place: what became of...
Armchair Adventures
From the Pacific Islands to the American West, books that take you far away. Among the Islands by Tim Flannery In Tim Flannery's chest beats the wayfaring heart of a discoverer, and in this book, which details his colorful adventures among the...
Can Caffeine Kill?
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz What energy drinks do to you. By legend it all started in Ethiopia more than 1,000 years ago when a goatherd named Kaldi noticed something: after his flock nibbled berries from a certain bush they seemed to hop and sprint...
Disney's New Princess
Byline: Nina Strochlic The ethnically ambiguous Sofia. Disney's newest princess, Sofia, is having an unexpectedly rocky debut. It all started when executive producer Jamie Mitchell, when asked about the darker complexion of Sofia's mother, explained...
Doin' It 'Gangnam Style'
Byline: Marlow Stern The truth behind Psy, YouTube's biggest star. Psy is exhausted. Over the past week, the 34-year-old Internet anomaly traveled to Australia, California, and New York to promote his song "Gangnam Style," the music video for...
Forget the Ladies
Byline: Linda Hirshman The gender gap doesn't matter--and it never has. You always know the Democrats are in big trouble when the media starts harping on the gender gap. This time it's "gender gap near historic highs." Repeat after me: so what?...
Get It Done, Mr. President
Byline: Michael Tomasky It's time to show us--really show us--how much you want another four years. I once heard a political consultant say: "The point of getting elected is getting reelected." Cynical, shallow, insiderish? You bet--all of that....
Is Apple out of Ideas?
Byline: Andrew Blum Thinner, faster, lighter, but nothing new. Apple is done. Or rather, they've done it. They're on their way to perfecting the vision laid out 30 years ago at the twin dawn of the personal computer and the Internet: wireless,...
My Favorite Mistake: Eric Idle
Byline: Eric Idle On his surreal second wedding. This might be dangerous, and my wife's a little worried, but getting married for the second time is my favorite mistake. The nice thing about it is that it seems like a mistake, but it isn't. Most...
Obama's Mideast Surprise
Byline: Niall Ferguson Will the president wag the dog in Tehran? Everyone knows there could be a surprise before Nov. 6--a news story that finally makes up the minds of those undecided voters in the swing states and settles the presidential election....
Simon Schama on Skyfall's Leaner, Meaner James Bond
Byline: Simon Schama Shake us. Stir us. James Bond is back and cooler than ever. The iconic spy at 50. 50 years of excitingly detonated hardware and women breathing "Jaaames" in states of postcoital gratitude, thousands of air miles clocked en...
Soledad O'Brien
Byline: Lloyd Grove A cable host's new bite. Soledad O'Brien looked angry Oct. 22 as she shut down America's Mayor. "You gotta stop putting words in my mouth, sir!" the anchor of CNN's Starting Point scolded Mitt Romney surrogate Rudy Giuliani,...
The Case against Sgt. Bales
Byline: Raymond Bonner Did the U.S. soldier accused of a Kandahar massacre act alone? At around 3 a.m. on March 11, if the United States government is to be believed, a hero turned into a monster. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, a family man and decorated...
The Contagion of Success
Byline: Daniel Gross Why consumers are optimistic again. On Oct. 26, number crunchers were presented with two seemingly conflicting economics statistics. The Commerce Department reported that the economy grew at a mediocre 2 percent annual rate...
The Snack-Food Trap
Byline: Laura Beil Science is now proving what we've long suspected: we're hard-wired to want the foods that are worst for us. Like most recovering addicts, Kay Sheppard has a testimony. Hers is this: the Florida mother of two spent years making...
What's in a Political Brain?
Byline: Helen Fisher Obama, Romney, and the genetics of power. Barack Obama and Mitt Romney may appear to be originals. But they--like all the rest of us--have inherited some of their political perspectives. The "genetics of politics," as...
Women, Wives, and HeadScarves
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Cherchez La Femme Women are all the rage--or, better put, the source of all rage--at the European Union these days. After an acrimonious debate, the EU's commissioners (i.e., ministers) shelved plans for legislation...