Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 15, April 19

After Boston
Byline: Michael Tomasky We must not wallow in fear or self-pity. it is, obviously, understandable that people are shocked when something like the Boston bombing happens. Such an attack is a shocking thing--the images, the video, the beautiful...
Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey Before There Were Scientists The word "scientist" was not coined until 1833. Before that, scientific disciplines were the domain of mostly wealthy men and women who called themselves "natural philosophers." They might...
Bristol, Bridge to the Wide World
Byline: Sara Wheeler DEK Growing up in a port, you look outward. The low elephant grief of ships' horns was the soundtrack of my Bristolian childhood. We were proud of our seafaring roots: my parents named my brother Mathew after the ship in...
Drowning in Oil
Byline: Mark Hertsgaard The 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill was even worse than BP wanted us to know. It's as as Dawn dishwashing liquid." That's what Jamie Griffin says the BP man told her about the smelly, rainbow-streaked gunk coating the floor...
Food to Die For
Byline: Lawrence Osborne Welcome to Bangkok, heaven on a plate. Chef robert Oliver, in a recent piece on The Huffington Post, declared that Bangkok is "the Lady Gaga of Asia" and that her street food is the best on earth. It's an understatement,...
For Luxury, Look East
Byline: Akhil Sharma Beyond Istanbul's bustle, the rest of Turkey beguiles upscale travelers. The surprising thing about the Museum Hotel is not what it is--a museum and a hotel--but where it is, in Cappadocia, in eastern Turkey. For anyone...
Gaddafi Is Dead. Long Live Art
Byline: Hisham Matar In Libya, behold a cultural revolution. The Libyan poet Khaled Mattawa and I agreed to meet by the Arch of Marcus Aurelius, in the heart of Tripoli. I was there a few minutes early and walked toward the familiar structure...
Golf's Young Master
Byline: Luke Kerr-Dineen Guan Tianlang, 14, is the sport's newest prodigy. There's perhaps no better way to understand golfer Guan Tianlang's accomplishment at the 2013 Masters this April than to let the cold, hard numbers tell the story: ...
Government to the Rescue in Boston
Byline: Paul Begala The heroism of public employees. There are lots of lessons we will, in time, draw from the Boston Marathon tragedy, but one is already clear: don't denigrate government workers. Along with some heroic civilians, it was government...
Greg Walden
Byline: david Freedlander He attacked Obama--and infuriated conservatives. If you harbor any doubt about the power of words, just take a look at Greg Walden. Last week the eight-term Republican congressman from Oregon went on CNN and accused...
How Safe Is America, Really?
Byline: Christopher Dickey, Daniel Klaidman, and Eli Lake The Boston Marathon bombing was not another 9/11. Not close. The order of magnitude speaks for itself: three dead in Boston, nearly 3,000 in New York City. Still, in the aftermath of the...
Lessons from All Corners
Byline: Peter Blair Henry Can the developed world learn from Barbados? In decades past, First World countries have lectured the rest of the world about how to stabilize and grow their economies. Today, in a startling turnaround, the developed...
Maids and Masters
Byline: Mac Margolis No one has more domestic servants than the Brazilians. But a new law is designed to move those downstairs upward. Complaining about the hired help in Brazil is as old as the New World. And yet like the nightly telenovela,...
Slow Progress
Byline: Rob Verger A medical journal corrects an obituary from 1858. It's common knowledge today that you can't get cholera by breathing foul air, but in 19th-century England it was a subject of much debate. Today we understand the way cholera...
The End of the Page 3 Girl?
Byline: Peter Jukes One woman takes on Rupert Murdoch to end half a century of topless pictures in Britain's bestselling tabloid. It was the height of London's euphoric Olympic summer last year. The usually cynical and dismissive British public...
The Last Man in Russia
Byline: Peter Pomerantsev Inside the soul of a drunk and bitter country. Dmitry Dudko wanted to be a priest in a violently atheistic Soviet Union. When the KGB came to arrest him in 1948, they demanded he recant poems denouncing Stalin. "I won't...
The Man Who Would Be King
Byline: Sridhar Pappu Young, handsome, and eloquent, A-Rod represented the future of baseball. Then came the downfall. These should be sun-filled days for America's national, if now somewhat beleaguered, sport. The spectacle of opening day--in...
The Watcher
Byline: Doug Stanton On the hunt with the FBI woman protecting New York from the next attack. Even while she sleeps, the dangerous voices are still speaking. Someone in St. Louis reports that two men in a truck are driving to New York with a...
What America Means to Israel
Byline: Fania Oz-Salzberger A deliciously awkward--and very special--relationship. The best nutshell definition of Israeli-U.S. relations is still the one attributed to Moshe Dayan. "Our American friends," he allegedly quipped, "offer us money,...