Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 16, April 26

A Meal to Remember
Byline: Bruce Palling Take 46 top chefs. Add Britain's freshest ingredients. Stir. When the international hospitality association Relais et Chateaux began nearly 60 years ago, it represented just eight of the best hotels and restaurants between...
Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey Darkly Digital Over the past few years as we've watched the digital revolution help bring about political and social revolutions around the world, it has seemed inevitable that the Internet would set people free. But...
Bad Apple?
Byline: Daniel Gross The company may just show us everything wrong with American business. On Tuesday, Apple, Inc. unleashed the corporate equivalent of shock and awe on the markets: its quarterly earning results. The company sold 39 million...
Betting on Baby
Byline: Nina Strochlic May the royal odds be ever in your favor. On april 29, Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge will toast to one year of nuptial bliss, but the fervor surrounding them since their televised Westminster Abbey wedding...
Camera at the Ready
Byline: Lynsey Addario A new biography captures the unflinching life of war photographer Tim Hetherington. We stood along the Abas Ghar ridgeline, eating meals out of envelopes, surrounded by tall, narrow cedar trees that shot straight up into...
Game On
Byline: Brian Ries The future of videogames is virtually otherworldly. I am sitting at an expansive wooden conference table in the basement of the painfully hip Ace Hotel in New York City, snacking on pepperoni, drinking the hotel's painfully...
Have More Fun in Bed?
Byline: Jennifer Block Osphena, as the recently FDA-approved drug is called, is the newest answer for painful sex. The drug's creator, pharmaceutical company Shionogi, Inc., is particularly interested in the more than 64 million U.S. women who have...
He's No Berlusconi
Byline: Barbie latza Nadeau Italy just got itself a new prime minster. By Italian standards, it was positively expeditious. Only two months after the elections, a prime minister was appointed and handed the unenviable task of forming a workable...
Love Is in the Air
Byline: Brian Ries Richard Branson wants fliers of Virgin America to get lucky--at 35,000 feet. The Golden-Coiffed president of the Virgin Group, with an estimated net worth of $4.6 billion (half of which he has recently pledged to charity),...
Michael Bay, Transformed?
Byline: Marlow Stern The director takes a break from blowing things up. Sort of. He is reviled by critics and beloved by fanboys, who have shelled out billions of dollars in allowance money to partake in his assorted symphonies of destruction....
Our Obsession with Killers
Byline: Paul Begala We're giving the Boston bombers the notoriety they crave. Two boys from a troubled region come to America. They are welcomed into the freest, most prosperous, most tolerant country on Earth. They are given welfare, a good...
The Children of Killers
Byline: Eliza Shapiro The daughter of the Boston bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev and many like her will forever wonder if they are also 'bad seeds.' Are they right? A week after her father, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, allegedly set off a bomb near the finish...
The Motley Crew of Pakistani Politics
Byline: Nazar Ul Islam The candidates competing in the May elections are nothing if not a colorful bunch. Actors, pop stars, disgraced politicians, alleged terrorists, and even a former pinup girl--Pakistan's freewheeling general elections have...
The Queen of the Cowboys
Byline: Mac Margolis As one of Brazil's biggest landowners, Katia Abreu rides a horse to work and never shuns a fight. The Braziliancerrado is no place for a tenderfoot. In the dry season in Alianca, the township just below the Amazon basin where...
The Secret Faith of Washington
Byline: Joshua DuBois A godless city? Please. President Obama's former religious adviser on the surprising number of believers in D.C.'s corridors of power. In 1993, Pat Robertson, the Christian broadcaster and stalwart of the religious right,...
The Tsunamis Are Coming
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Are 20-foot waves about to hit the East Coast? After a decade that saw two of the most devastating tsunamis in recent history--the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004, which killed 230,000 people, and the 2011 tsunami that...
Was Salinger a Phony?
Byline: Jimmy So Early letters reveal author could be a 'terrific liar.' J.D. Salinger founded adolescent angst, so what a relief to learn that he himself was a mimic of Holden Caulfield. New York's Morgan Library recently acquired 9 letters...
Who Lives Longest?
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Healthy, wealthy--and famous. The NewYork Times obituary section can tell us an awful lot. Using 999 consecutive obituaries that were published between 2009 and 2011, Australian researchers collected basic information on...