Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 20, May 29

Anatomy of A Scandal
Byline: Caitlin Dickson The still-unraveling mess of the IRS debacle. IT MAY have dominated headlines for weeks but to many, the Internal Revenue Scandal is complex and confusing--and it is still unraveling. For those trying to catch up, here's...
Brit Marling's Anarchist Collective
Byline: Marlow Stern The actress ditched Goldman Sachs for Freeganism. Within minutes of speaking with Brit Marling, you realize she isn't like most young actresses. Sure, she's pretty--stunning, actually. She has a breezy aplomb, a la Emma Stone...
Dots. Dottier. Dottiest?
Byline: Brian Ries What's behind the latest gamer craze. DANIEL SAVAGE is a champion iPhone gamer who thinks he's got the touch. "There's no secret to genius," he joked with us by email. "You either have it or you don't." The Brooklyn-based...
Fight! Fight! Fight!
Byline: Rob Verger When astronauts argue at zero gravity. IMAGINE HAVING an altercation with a coworker. Now imagine being trapped with that person in a spaceship hurtling toward Mars. At NASA, scientists have been thinking a lot about the...
Fjords by Horseback
Byline: Janet Rodgers Saddle up for the ride of a lifetime through Iceland. In the month of June, the sun hardly sets on Iceland, and summer can unfurl to longer than 20 daylight hours. Marked by intense geological activity, Iceland's name confounds....
Hezbollah Comes Clean
Byline: Mike Giglio The leader of the militant lebanese group finally admits sending fighters to Syria. For the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, the casualties finally became too numerous to explain away. It was already an open secret that...
Is Apple Too Clever by Half?
Byline: Daniel Gross Maybe corporate America finally got too greedy for its own good. Apple always seemed like the perfect company. Not so fast. When CEO Tim Cook testified before Congress on May 25, he didn't come to talk about Apple's latest...
Leniency for Leakers
Byline: Eli Lake Why Obama should go easier on them. ON JUNE 3, a military court-martial will begin for Bradley Manning, a U.S. Army private who was arrested in 2010 for carrying out the largest leak in U.S. history. The trial begins at a moment...
Oh la La
Byline: Sarah Begley Steamy romance wins in Cannes. Love was in the air last week on the French Riviera. Just days after France legalized gay marriage, a lesbian love story scooped up the coveted Palme d'Or at the Cannes film festival. Blue Is...
Old Moms, Tall Kids
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz The surprising news about the children of older mothers. OLDER PARENTS of new babies sometimes feel that they are swimming against nature's current, spawning in their 30s or 40s and not in their friskier 20s. A woman's...
The Most Famous Brain in the World
Byline: Robert Herritt Reliving life every 30 seconds. By the end of his life in December 2008, 82-year-old Henry Molaison had the most famous brain in the world. This would have been news to Molaison. Just about everything was. As a result...
What Are You Waiting For?
Byline: Megan McArdle The many cases for getting married younger. Pity poor Susan Patton. A member of the pioneering class of 200 women who turned Princeton coed in 1973, she is now, in her own words, "a nice Jewish mother." A nice Jewish mother...
When Children Play at War
Byline: Andrew Romano Through the decades, the toys that bring the battle home. War is not child's play--except when it is. In a new exhibition called War Games, which opened May 25 at the V&A Museum of Childhood in London, curators Ieuan...
When the Media Attacks
Byline: Peter Jukes how the British press became the tool of brutal killers. IT WAS not the British media's finest hour. As news of the horrific killing of British soldier Drummer Lee Rigby, 25, filtered onto social media, it was accompanied...
You're Being Hacked
Byline: Michael Moynihan Cyberspies are everywhere. But who are they helping? Winding through corridors lined with poison-tipped umbrellas, pistols fashioned from lipstick tubes, and bulky button-hole cameras, visitors to Washington's International...