Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 21, June 5

Are You Sneezing Yet?
Byline: Josh Dzieza Climate change drives up the pollen count. FIRST THE heat. Then the storms. Now the ... pollen? Massive quantities of pollen are floating through the air, causing people to sniff, sneeze, and itch. And it turns out a changing...
Bye-Bye, Buttons
Byline: Nina Strochlic BlackBerry has what nobody wants. LET'S FACE it: the reign of buttons is over. BlackBerrys, once the hallmark of the corporate set, have become second rate as iPhones and Androids have overtaken the cellular market. But...
Can This Man Protect Us?
Byline: Daniel Klaidman James Comey is Obama's pick to run the FBI-our front line in the war on terror. But is he too self-righteous for his own good? It was the defining achievement to date in the career of James Comey: as deputy attorney general...
Embryos for Sale!
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Fertilized eggs go on the market. A RECENT article in The New England Journal of Medicine has what might be one of the most alarming headlines of the year: "Made-to-Order Embryos for Sale: A Brave New World?" Here's...
Follow the Leader
Byline: Omid Memarian Expect an Ayatollah-approved candidate to win Iran's elections. IN IRAN'S June 14 presidential election, Iranians will be free to elect one of eight candidates, but none will be bringing hope or change any time soon. All...
Joss Whedon's Passion Project
Byline: Marlow Stern The producer-director on Shakespeare, female superheroes, and what pisses him off about the industry. On a recent Thursday, a gaggle of teenagers wielding cameras and pens are huddled in front of the Trump SoHo hotel in downtown...
Kill Zone
Byline: Christopher Dickey The boy is 17. His mother was killed by gang gunfire. His uncle was shot for his coat. To him, gun control isn't about rights. It's about survival. Tyquran Horton, 17, lost one of his uncles before he was born--shot...
Megyn Kelly Goes Viral
Byline: Jake Heller She may not be a feminist, but she's now a feminist icon. THE TWITTERSPHERE was set ablaze with hundreds of tweets containing the terms "Megyn Kelly" and "breadwinner" after the Fox News anchor eviscerated--with passion, poise,...
Modern Art's Last Gasp
Byline: Blake Gopnik Has all the art in the world been made? I magine a single work of art that captured a sense that, after all these decades of trying, modern art hasn't managed to change the world, or even much affect it. A sense that,...
New Order in the Court
Byline: Walter Olson When it comes to the Fourth Amendment, some surprises. AGAIN AND again this term, in shifting 5-4 and 6-3 configurations, the U.S. Supreme Court has shown itself profoundly divided in parsing one of the core provisions of...
Pussy Riot Strikes Again
Byline: Marlow Stern Freed from prison, a member of the feminist collective sets the record straight. I t was sloppy and lasted under a minute, but it sowed the seeds of discontent for future generations. On February 21, 2012, five...
Reporting for Duty
Byline: Andrew Roberts A new life of the man who saved Britain. The publication of Nelson: The Sword of Albion, the second and final volume of John Sugden's monumental life of Horatio Nelson, is a perfect time to reflect on what the admiral's...
Slash and Burn
Byline: Mac Margolis Brazil's rainforest is going up in smoke. Again. AS BRAZIL'S skyscrapers and silos rose, it seemed the most impressive quality of this 21st-century Latin American powerhouse was its ability to grow without trashing the environment....
Summer's TV Drought Is Over
Byline: Kevin Fallon The shows you'll want to watch. For television addicts, specifically those who pride themselves on having taste more Homeland than Honey Boo Boo, summer is no longer a season of mourning. For decades, nail-biting cliffhangers,...
The Morality Test
Byline: Michelle Cottle Your doctor can read your DNA. But genetic testing raises ethical questions that American medicine is not prepared to answer. Karen Kramer has lost track of the number of times she has lifted her shirt to show off her...
The Secret of Success
Byline: Lucas Wittmann How to win a Pulitzer. ONE EDITOR, two books--one a novel about North Korea, the other an 800-page behemoth about the road to the Vietnam War--some 15 years of collective writing time between them, and then a pair of Pulitzer...
When Putin Became Obama's Problem
Byline: Eli Lake From Syria to nukes, Moscow just keeps getting in the way. LATER THIS month, Presidents Obama and Putin will both attend a G8 summit in Northern Ireland. The two men will be meeting at what is likely to be an ugly moment in U.S.-Russia...