Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 22, June 12

Dunkin' Cronuts
Byline: Brian Ries How one pastry is driving a city crazy. It's just before 7 o'clock on a sunny Thursday morning in New York City's SoHo neighborhood, and dozens of people--a few of them still in pajamas--have lined up outside a sun-drenched...
In a Dark, Dark Room
Byline: Isabel Wilkinson Leave the white gallery walls behind for an eerie trip back to the countercultural '60s. It's art--done differently. Walking between the sterile white booths at Art Basel, the four-day art fair that opened in Switzerland...
In the Company of Men
Byline: Eleanor Clift The Senate has changed. Why can't the U.S. military? WHEN A dozen military leaders testified before Congress earlier this month about the alarming rise of sexual assaults in their ranks, they faced a Senate panel that included...
Is She the World's Most Powerful Collector?
Byline: Christopher Dickey Mayassa al-Thani may be a 'tomboy' princess. But she's also turning Qatar into a grand museum. Maybe it was inevitable that as Mayassa al-Thani grew more powerful, she would grow more quiet, more distant from her old...
It's All Greek to Him
Byline: Daniel Gross Five years ago, Chobani didn't exist. Now it's a billion-dollar business. How the son of a small-town shepherd made good. Turkish Kurd comes to the U.S. with $3,000 in his pocket, gets a feel for the country, ends up buying...
Monkeying with the Barrels
Byline: Andrew Romano Chickpeas in your bourbon? Buffalo trace wants to improve tradition--by messing with it. Freddie Johnson is a traditional guy. His grandfather, James Johnson Sr., served for 52 years as a foreman at the George T. Stagg distillery...
Spying as They like It
Byline: Michael Moynihan The scary contradictions of the NSA mess. IN 2011, Republican Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin stated that "as author of the Patriot Act," he "applaud[ed] the House and Senate" for extending provisions of the controversial...
Sunny with a Chance of Cancer
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz How much should we worry about sunshine? WITH SUMMER here, it's fair to ask: is sunshine a public-health menace or a savior? For the last 30 or 40 years, a loud anti-sunshine message has ruled the day. This has meant gallons...
The Great Chocolate Fix?
Byline: Megan McArdle Why American confectioners don't need a conspiracy to set prices. CANADIAN AUTHORITIES have accused the country's four biggest chocolate manufacturers of colluding to fix prices. The allegations have a certain film noir...
The Most Charming Ride of a Lifetime
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula A writer follows in her grandparents' tracks 63 years later. It's a beautiful day in Colorado and I'm getting a crash course in birding while riding an Amtrak train hustling along at 79 miles per hour. Anytime something...
The New Art Stars
Byline: Christian Viveros-Faune How celebs are shaking up the global art market. First there were artists. Then there were patrons--rich people with enough good taste that they enabled artists to live and make their art. Eventually, patrons made...
The New Mrs. Putin?
Byline: Anna Nemtsova After the Russian president and his wife announced their divorce last week, signs point to a growing role for Putin's rumored mistress. The timing certainly seemed suspicious--days before Russian President Vladimir Putin...
The Rap-Ification of Brian Williams
Byline: Ben Teitelbaum Jimmy Fallon's supercut is the best thing ever. One, two, three, and to the four. Snoop Doggy Dogg and ... Brian Williams is at the door? Has the veteran newsman traded the anchor desk for the recording booth? Several...
The Taliban's Life of Luxury
Byline: Ron Moreau Is Afghanistan destined to be run by a drug mafia? Pashtunabad--a poor, wind- and flyblown suburb of Quetta--is the type of Pakistani town where commanders in the Afghan Taliban generally lived after being kicked out of their...
The War against Superman
Byline: Jimmy So Seventy-five years on, he's still ready to save us. Superman's symbol thrives in a time of war, and for evidence of this you only have to watch the National Guard's commercial for the new film Man of Steel. "The uniform they...
Wait, What about Gitmo?
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Quietly, Obama may be moving ahead. THREE WEEKS ago, President Obama tried to seize the initiative in balancing the war on terror with civil liberties. In a major address at the National Defense University in Washington,...
We the Jury
Byline: Caroline Linton Will the jury's racial makeup decide George Zimmerman's fate? WHEN THE jury voted to acquit O.J. Simpson on October 3, 1995, of the double murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, many blamed the racial makeup...
Why Apple Went Flat
Byline: Nina Strochlic Two-dimensional design is the wave of the future. IF YOU can remember the days of cassette tapes, leather-bound planners, and yellow legal pads, you may be aging out of Apple's target demographic. At the company's Worldwide...