Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 23, June 19

Anthony Marshall's Gilded Age
Byline: Caroline Linton Is it worth paying up to $200,000 a year to send Brooke Astor's son to jail? THE DEFENDANT had not shown up to Manhattan's Supreme Court on Monday; his lawyers had asked Justice A. Kirke Bartley for one last reprieve for...
Are You Man Enough?
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz A treatment playing on male insecurity can backfire in dangerous ways. MEN, THERE'S something new for you to feel bad about, and it's not an expanding waistline or a receding hairline. Rather, you might have a testosterone...
Happy Days Are Here Again
Byline: Daniel Gross The prophets of American economic decline revise their thinking. THE HOT new idea in the post-bust years was American economic decline. Now, it seems to be ... American economic optimism? Fifty-one months after an impressive...
Mighty Miya
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula Her ancestors were swordsmiths, and now she's performing alchemy by turning metal into art. Move over, Man of Steel. There's a new superhero in the city. Miya Ando is disarmingly petite; wears all black, goggles, and steel-toed...
Paramount's Apocalyptic Gamble
Byline: Marlow Stern Can Brad Pitt sell audiences on the walking dead? The stakes are enormous. With its distribution deal with superhero factory Marvel kaput, Paramount is desperate for a new film franchise to hang its hat on--and zombies, experiencing...
Pool Party
Byline: Brian Ries Swim in the East River? New Yorkers might want to reconsider. IT TOOK a while for Dong-Ping Wong, a New York City architect--whose firm has designed buildings, a Dallas housing block, and a pedestrian bridge in Slovenia--to...
Sorry, It's Not 1984
Byline: Michael M. Moynihan Why we're not living in Orwell's Dystopia. After leaker Edward Snowden revealed the existence of massive domestic-surveillance programs operated by the NSA, the airwaves were clotted with pundits and politicians summoning...
The Fight for Black Men
Byline: Joshua DuBois There are more African-Americans on probation, parole, or in prison today than were slaves in 1850. It is not a crisis of crime. It is a crisis of people being left behind. There is an easy way to meet Joe Jones, and a hard...
The 'Me, Me, Me' Wedding
Byline: Hannah Seligson How America is exporting its bridezilla culture. When I got married last October, all I heard were variants of "This is your day. It's all about you." These messages made me uncomfortable, both because they promoted entering...
The Secret to a Celebrity Fitness Craze
Byline: Sarah Elizabeth Richards What's the formula behind the viral success of Barry's Bootcamp? In the cool, dark fitness studio painted in camouflage and lit like a nightclub, instructor Todd Mendiola shouts, "Let's get this done!" This is...
The Tea Party Hero Who Saved Obamacare
Byline: Eleanor Clift Arizona's governor defies expectations. THIS WEEK, Arizona became the 24th state to approve Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare--but only because of the efforts of an extremely unlikely advocate:...
Think Pink
Byline: Sophie Barrett Take your summer drinking seriously with these Roses. As the days lengthen and the sun shines bright, even serious wine drinkers start thinking pink. Rose, generally made from the juice of red wine grapes macerated for...
Turkey's Opposition Grows Up
Byline: Mike Giglio It started as a small protest in a tiny park. But Erdogan's hard line created a movement that won't disappear quickly. The voice on the loudspeaker sounded through Gezi Park again Saturday night. "Children, old people, and...
Under the Spotlight
Byline: Lizzie Crocker From Nigella to Rihanna, the media spin personal pain. ON SUNDAY, a British tabloid dropped bombshell pictures of millionaire art collector Charles Saatchi with his hands around the throat of his wife, celebrity chef Nigella...
Will They Keep Spying on You?
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Obama's choice to be head of the FBI has an iffy record on surveillance. JAMES COMEY, President Obama's expected choice to lead the FBI, will likely be nominated amid the uproar over the National Security Agency's domestic...
Woodland, Desert, Tiger Stripe
Byline: Josh Dzieza How many camos can one military have? THE U.S. military may have to clean out its closet. After a decade of proliferating camouflage designs--pixelated patterns, flowing color splotches, and even tiny globes and anchors--to...