Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 25, July 10

Aaron Sorkin's Take Two
Byline: Kevin Fallon 'The Newsroom' returns--but this time you should watch. How does a freshman show that became infamous for its legion of hate-watchers return for a second season--and still get people to tune in? That's the problem facing...
Addicted to Pop
Byline: Marlow Stern You won't be able to turn off this trio from Glasgow. Lauren Mayberry, the radiant lead singer of the electropop trio Chvrches, isn't after your sympathy. When strident synthesizers threaten to overpower the 25-year-old's...
All Hail Almonds
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula Why it's time to ditch the soy milk. A PERFECT storm is brewing in the refrigerated aisle at your local supermarket. Soy milk, once the darling of milk substitutes, is losing ground to a nuttier competitor: almond milk....
By the Skin of Our Teeth
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Ancient molars reveal new evolutionary clues. PLEASE DO floss. Teeth, it turns out, are useful for something other than chewing food and keeping dentists in business. In fact, our teeth leave behind a durable record, a...
Crazy for Candy Crush
Byline: Brian Ries The app you won't be able to turn off. YOUR MISSION in one of the most addicting games of the summer: match three candies of a kind in a row to accumulate points. When new candies fall from above replacing those you've crushed,...
Death in the Desert
Byline: Terry Greene Sterling As the immigration debate rages in Washington and Congress pushes for a $46.6 billion border-security surge, undocumented immigrants continue to perish in Arizona's harsh wilderness. One mother's attempt to bring her...
Enchanter of Lost Souls
Byline: Jerome Charyn The haunting, forgotten genius of James Purdy. He looks like a zombie in his last photograph, a patch of sunken skin and bones who wrote about skeletons and dreamy half-dead children all his life. He lived in the same closetlike...
Finding the Story
Byline: Joseph J. Ellis An author pays tribute to a remarkable historian and teacher. EDMUND MORGAN, who died Monday, was my teacher at Yale from 1965 to 1969 and my mentor and role model in America history ever since. In our last conversation,...
Gold Loses Its Luster
Byline: Daniel Gross Wall Street got hot for the precious metal, then everything dimmed. AND THE first one now will later be last. It's a line from Bob Dylan's '60s anthem "The Times They Are A-Changin'. " But it applies as well to a couple...
Ice Cream for Dinner!
Byline: Megan McArdle Forget rum raisin or mint chocolate chip. It's time to start your meal with a savory treat flavored with feta, carrots, or bacon. Any self-respecting child has dreamed of having ice cream for dinner. Not just as a distant...
Is Gitmo Really Closing?
Byline: Daniel Klaidman The White House gets an unlikely assist from the Tea Party. SINCE PRESIDENT Obama vowed last May to revive his stalled efforts to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, there have been small, mostly symbolic signs...
She's Been Lewinsky'd
Byline: Kelsey Meany Not quite The Good Wife. Not quite Monica. What happens to the sexters? ANTHONY WEINER is in the public eye again, decked out in florescent-colored pants as he peddles his hard sell to become the next mayor of New York City....
The Gem of Morocco
Byline: Alex Lowther This climber's paradise can't be found in any guidebooks. As local American transplant and guide Kristoffer Erickson puts it, Taghia, a remote village in the High Atlas mountains in Central Morocco is like the Yosemite of...
The Road to Mandalay
Byline: Ben Schreckinger Once an isolated imperial outpost, Burma is now the center of a battle between East and West. On a map, the passage from the Chinese border to the Burmese town of Lashio looks fairly direct. But on the ground, slow-moving...
The War in Egypt Comes to Washington
Byline: Peter Beinart The left-right ideological battle is back with all-or-nothing dogmas that would doom Obama. A year ago, Egyptians elected Mohamed Morsi of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood to be their president. Last week, after mass anti-Morsi...
Too Young to Be Innocent?
Byline: Caroline Linton Is Trayvon Martin a victim not just of racial profiling but youth profiling too? THE QUESTION burns for all teenagers: would George Zimmerman have singled out Trayvon Martin if he had been an adult? On George Zimmerman's...
What If You Could Learn Everything?
Byline: Anya Kamenetz How a new technology that figures out just how your mind works is about to make us all a whole lot smarter. Imagine every student has a tireless personal tutor, an artificially intelligent and inexhaustible companion that...
With Friends like These --
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai Why Taliban fighters are the real peacemakers in Afghanistan. NEGOTIATING A peaceful solution to the nearly 13-year-old Afghan conflict has never looked more complicated. The Taliban's leadership is so deeply...