Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 26, July 17

After Bush, the Blues
Byline: Peter Beinart Since the 43rd president left office, GOP pessimists have taken full control of the party. The juxtaposition between image and text could not have been more humiliating. The photo above The New York Times story featured...
'A Girl in the Locker Room?!'
Byline: Adrienne Vogt A new documentary tracks the plight of the female sportswriter. COACHES PHYSICALLY pushed them out of locker rooms. Players taunted them, slapped them with towels, and poured water over them. They got death threats from...
Apology Not Accepted
Byline: Rob Verger When fighting with your partner, think twice before resorting to 'I'm sorry.' WHY DO couples fight? Keith Sanford, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor University, wanted to try to get to the bottom...
Brazil's Celebrity Priest
Byline: Mac Margolis Father Marcelo Rossi has a No. 1 bestseller, legions of followers, and an unusual style of Catholicism. Trim and tidy in a worn white blazer, his hair cut for Sunday, Jose Batista da Silva kneels on the cement floor and prays....
Come Sail Away
Byline: Sarah Elizabeth Richards Summer's swanky pastime isn't as exclusive as you think. At the end of his workday in steamy midtown Manhattan, Joel Terry craves relaxing outdoors. But these days, instead of starting his hourlong commute home...
Fowl Play
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula Chicken sashimi is the other pink meat. But don't try it at home. Few people would dream of asking for "chicken--medium rare, please" at their next neighborhood barbecue, but at a few (emphasis on few) restaurants around...
Has Mitch Met His Match?
Byline: Eleanor Clift Alison Grimes will try to evict one of Washington's most powerful Republicans from the Senate. A DEMOCRATIC senator from Kentucky? The idea may sound far-fetched, but Alison Lundergan Grimes, 34, is about to take her shot....
It's Cropping Up Crop Tops
Byline: Isabel Wilkinson Think sophisticated, not scandalous. When the Spring/Summer 2013 collections debuted on runways last fall, it sent a collective shiver through the fashion world: by summer, fashionable women everywhere were going to have...
Stateless in Kuwait
Byline: Maya Jaggi The winner of the 'Arabic Booker' tackles ethnic prejudice in the Middle East. The oil-rich Middle East depends on migrants--from legions of house servants to the construction workers who build the region's gleaming, sky-high...
The Convict
Byline: Eli Lake Robert Becker had a firsthand view of Egypt's drift away from democracy. FOR OBSERVERS of international politics, it hasn't been easy to figure out what to make of Egypt over the past few weeks. Whom, if anyone, should we be...
The Enduring Rift
Byline: Joshua DuBois Understanding our inner Trayvons and inner Zimmermans. By this point, all Americans know the facts. A teenager, Trayvon Martin, was pursued and killed. The shooter, George Zimmerman, was acquitted, his claim of self-defense...
The Good Banker
Byline: Daniel Gross Herbert Allison defied Wall Street stereotypes. HERBERT ALLISON, who died Sunday at age 69, was that rarest of birds in 21st-century America: a public-minded investment banker. Rather than retire after losing out in the CEO...
The Road to Greekovery
Byline: Barbie Latza Nadeau Antonis Samaras is optimistic about Greece. But many of his countrymen aren't buying it. A YEAR ago "Grexit" was the summer catchphrase among Europeans who had largely written off Greece as the first casualty of the...
TV's Transformative Moment
Byline: Hugh Ryan Netflix's new show takes a casting cue from real life. Orange Is the New Black, Netflix's original series that debuted on July 11, is no prison TV show by way of Victoria's Secret. Created by Jenji Kohan (the mind behind Weeds),...