Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 30, August 23

A Blue Season for Blueberries
Byline: Jesse Ellison A quiet harvest has producers worried that something's rotten in the state of Maine, where most of the world's wild blueberries are grown. Maine's Washington County is the farthest east you can get in America. It's where...
A Penny Deferred
Byline: Winston Ross A radical new way to pay for college. If Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley has his way, the whole country will soon be considering a new way to pay for college at publicly run schools. Merkley is calling on his colleagues to fund...
Family Ties
Byline: Eleanor Clift Michelle Nunn wants to end the Democrats' losing streak in Georgia and win back her father's Senate seat. No Democrat has won statewide office in Georgia since 1998. But Michelle Nunn intends to change that by winning the...
Free at Last
Byline: Joshua DuBois Fifty years later, we're closer than you think to realizing Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream. When I was 6 years old, I was in a children's gospel choir. Most of the songs we sang were kids' standards like "Jesus Loves the...
Happy Birthday, Iris!
Byline: Tavi Gevinson The fashion world's youngest star, Tavi Gevinson, interviews its oldest star, Iris Apfel. But who is younger at heart? Iris Apfel has become world-renowned for her eccentric sense of style. She has been called a fashion...
Postcards from Home
Byline: Sarah Elizabeth Richards I discovered a whole new world by vacationing in my own city. The proposal sat in my Airbnb email inbox for two days before I answered it: a retired German couple was visiting New York and wanted to rent out my...
Preventing Pandemics
Byline: Rob Verger In a remote corner of the world, an American lieutenant colonel is helping with the construction of a high-tech laboratory to study and prevent the spread of anthrax and the plague. The future home of the Central Reference...
Rediscovering Dylan's 'Self Portrait'
Byline: Malcolm Jones The musician's most recent bootleg installment, 'Another Self Portrait,' brings Bob the man--and his much derided album--into focus. "What is this shit?" Thus did Greil Marcus kick off his 1970 Rolling Stone review of...
Talk, Now Walk?
Byline: Andrew Romano Eric Garcetti, L.A.'s new mayor, knows how to send signals. Will he know how to govern? Eric Garcetti is good at the symbolism thing. Garcetti, who took office as mayor of Los Angeles on July 1, is half Jewish and half...
The Believer
Byline: Ben Birnbaum Tzipi Livni still thinks peace is possible in Israel and Palestine. She's about to get her chance to prove it. In early 2011, a disgruntled former employee of the Palestinian negotiating team handed Al Jazeera the biggest...
The Forgotten Cuisine
Byline: Paul Wachter From Thai to Greek to Ethiopian, the U.S. is awash in foods from all over the world. But when will Native American cooking finally get its moment? Nephi Craig graduated from culinary school in 2000 and began a promising career....
The Secret Is Out
Byline: Edward Platt Fabien Riggall's evenings bring the arts to life with an air of mystery. "It doesn't matter if you're discovering a piece of music or a film--it's very similar," says Fabien Riggall, founder and creative director of an organization...
The Tower of Tennis
Byline: Sujay Kumar John Isner is the brightest American hope on the court, but can he win the U.S. Open? You probably know what John Isner looks like, even if you don't know his name. Isner is that really tall guy--as in 6-foot-10, shoe-size-15...
The Unknown Nazi Hunter
Byline: Nico Hines Even his closest relatives didn't know that Hanns Alexander tracked down some of history's most notorious war criminals. Throughout his life, Hanns Alexander was known as a prankster. At parties and weddings in London, he usually...