Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 33, September 20

An Iconoclast's Next Act
Byline: Stacy Perman Noreena Hertz was the darling of the anti-globalization set for her 2001 bestseller 'The Silent Takeover.' Now, with her newest book, she's looking to shake up a whole new field: the expertise industry. For an economist,...
An Uncensored Candidate
Byline: Eleanor Clift Steve Lonegan is a very conservative politician in a pretty liberal state, but at least you can't accuse him of pandering. Republican Senate candidate Steve Lonegan considers next month's special election in New Jersey a...
A Tall Order
Byline: Nico Hines The sky isn't the limit for an architect building the world's first invisible skyscraper. Charles Wee, one of the world's leading high-rise architects, has a confession to make: he's bored with skyscrapers. After designing...
From Porn to Politics
Byline: Katie Zavadski Adult film star Michael Lucas wades into the debate over gay rights in Russia. Michael Lucas's online biography describes him as "a porn star evolved"--and over the years, he has indeed branched into unusual territory for...
Kingmaker in the Making
Byline: Ben Jacobs A Democratic Iowa congressman could inherit one of the nation's heavier mantles when Senator Harkin retires next year. You wouldn't know it by his dad jeans or the earnest manner he uses when talking about his bipartisan legislative...
Rampage. Regret. Repeat
Byline: John Morse Can we ever stop the cycle? How one lawmaker lost his job fighting for gun control. And why he'd do it again. I was elected president of the Colorado state Senate in November 2012, four months after a deadly shooting in Aurora,...
The Great Charter Tryout
Byline: Andrea Gabor Are New Orleans's schools a model for the nation--or a cautionary tale? Long before Sci Academy, a charter school in New Orleans, had graduated its first senior class, the school was being heaped with accolades. In September...
The Man Who Broke the Internet
Byline: Winston Ross With a widely watched video stunt, Jimmy Kimmel raked in the ratings. But some say the television host damaged YouTube's credibility in the process. Jimmy Kimmel both won and broke the Internet last week, depending on whom...
The Money's on Her
Byline: Dan Gross At the Fed, Summers is out. Is Yellen in? On Monday Larry Summers, the economist with the larger-than-life resume (Harvard president, Treasury secretary, White House adviser, all-around genius), publicly bowed out of the race...
The Original Crazy One
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula The man who started the Creative Revolution, George Lois, reviews Robin Williams's new sitcom about an advertising agency. "I gotta tell ya, this Simon Roberts is way closer to me than Don fucking Draper." George Lois,...
The Persistence of Levity
Byline: Liesl Schillinger The early novels of Nancy Mitford reveal a wit in the making. Last week, reading Nancy Mitford's first foray into fiction, the novel Highland Fling, I positively exulted. The book had an ingenuousness to it, an unchecked...
The Reawakening of Mazzy Star
Byline: Nisha Gopalan The '90s alt-rock band returns with an album after a 17-year hiatus. Silence is the recurring theme throughout any Mazzy Star interview: the long pauses, the truncated sentences, and the reticence that comes with preserving...
You Are What You Buy
Byline: Blake Gopnik Phil Collins's video installation shows the lengths we'll go to just for a feeling. The only problem with the latest installation by the great Berlin-based artist Phil Collins is that it doesn't come with an amazing Ginsu...